College of Arts and Sciences

RELM 300 Introduction to Ministry
3.00 crs.

Taking a broad view of ministry, this course introduces the study and practice of Christian ministry, grounded in Scripture and the historical tradition and focused on the contemporary challenges and opportunities.

RELM 330 Church and Sacraments
3.00 crs.

This course examines the contemporary understanding of Church and sacraments and explores their implications for ministry and the life of faith today.

RELM 334 Ethics for Ministers
3.00 crs.

This course examines ethical conduct in ministry through an emphasis on Catholic ethics, personal spiritual formation, and formation of conscience that is foundational to one’s ethical life. Through a study of the biblical foundations of Christian ethics and ethical systems and their application, students will develop practical skills to address ethical issues and dilemmas they encounter in ministry. Through the development of a personal code of ethics, students will identify principles to guide their conduct in their lives and ministry. Through reflection on virtue ethics, students will practice ongoing spiritual formation that enriches and informs an ethical practice of ministry.

RELM 338 Introduction to the Bible for Ministry
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to the Bible in light of the best in contemporary biblical scholarship. It focuses on the Bible not as a museum piece but as the living Word of God that reveals, challenges, and comforts and that serves as a crucial resource for ministry.

RELM 346 Catholic Social Teaching
3.00 crs.

This course examines the development of Catholic social teaching, its foundations in theology and ethics, its principles and key themes. It emphasizes the importance of action in partnership in response to the invitation of Catholic social teaching.

RELM 370 Christ and the Christian Tradition
3.00 crs.

Fundamental theology in a post-conciliar church: focus on revelation, faith, grace and Christology; a brief review of the historical tradition as a background for creation-centered, liberationist theology today.

RELM 400 Religious Education in Theory and Practice
3.00 crs.

Foundational questions of religious education are investigated with particular focus given to the relationship between theory and practice.

RELM 430 Leadership in Ministry
3.00 crs.

This course offers a foundation for each student’s development of leadership skills used in the practice of ministry. It considers the qualities, practices, and responsibilities of effective leaders, with special attention paid to biblical-theological and theoretical theories of leadership, teamwork, communication, conflict, decision making, and the character, responsibilities, and spiritual life of the leader. It will assist students with becoming more reflective, theologically-based practitioners of ministry.

RELM 496 Senior Seminar
3.00 crs.

Religious education and pastoral ministry field experiences form the context of this course. The connection of theory and practice shapes the course content with special emphasis placed upon problem-raising, problem-solving and collaboration.

RELM 499 Independent Study
3.00 crs.
GREK A100 Beginning Greek I
3.00 crs.

Language tells us many things about a culture, not only in what people have to say but how they say it. This course introduces students to the world of the ancient Greeks through a study of their language.

LATN A100 Beginning Latin I
3.00 crs.

Language tells us many things about a culture, not only in what people have to say but how they say it. This course introduces students to the world of the ancient Romans through a study of their language.

CHEM A100 Chem Prep
3.00 crs.

This elective, pass-fail course is designed for students who want to take CHEM A105 but lack the prerequisites. Students develop and refine their ability to solve arithmetic, algebraic, and dimensional analysis types of problems using examples from the physical sciences, primarily chemistry and physics. Upon successful completion of this course, students have a strong foundation for General Chemistry I, CHEM A105. 

Permission of instructor
ENGL A100 Expository Writing
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to English composition that focuses on grammar, paragraph and essay structure, and critical reading skills. This course is for students who are not yet ready to take ENGL T122. Students are assigned to the course on the basis of a placement test administered by the English department. Students may not take ENGL A100 for degree credit after successful completion of ENGL T122.

ARAB A100 First Year Arabic I
3.00 crs.

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Modern Arabic. Students learn the Arabic alphabet, basic writing and conversational skills, and entry-level Arabic grammar, including gender of nouns and verbs and regular conjunctions. Students are also exposed to Arabic culture and customs of polite society.

GERM A100 First Year German I
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the German language.  Fundamental structure of the language including development of the four basic skills - comprehension, speaking, reading and writing - is the focus.

ITAL A100 First Year Italian I
3.00 crs.

This course covers the fundamentals of the Italian language with primary emphasis on listening comprehension, reading, speaking and writing.

FREN A100 First-year French I
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the fundamental structure of the french language. Development of the four basic skills - listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing - are of primary concern.

SPAN A100 First-year Spanish I
3.00 crs.

This course examines at the fundamental structure of the language emphasizing the development of the four basic skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.  The cultural elements of the Spanish-speaking world are also presented.

TEAC A100 Foundations of Multicultural Education
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the philosophical, historical, psychological, and socio-cultural foundations of education. Field experiences are included.

NEUR A100 Fundamentals of Neuroscience
3.00 crs.

This course is an introductory survey of topics and methods in neuroscience and the connection between brain and behavior. Topics will include neuronal structure and function, neuroanatomy, sensory systems, learning and memory and brain-related disorders and diseases. Students will gain specific knowledge of the basic experimental methods used in the neurosciences.

SPCH A100 Fundamentals of Speech
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the factors governing good speech content and delivery; an introduction to speech behavior in human interaction. Open to all students.

POLS A100 Introduction to American Government
3.00 crs.

Structure, development, powers, and limits of the federal government are discussed.

FRSC A100 Introduction to Forensic Science
3.00 crs.

This course will serve as a summary of the field of forensic science.  The student will be given information in the form of lectures and case studies. It will cover the basic principles associated with forensic science, as well as touch on many of the specialized disciplines of this field.  It will illustrate the path evidence takes from its collection at the crime scene, through analysis in the crime laboratory, and into the courtroom.  This course will focus on how forensic science plays a key role in all aspects of criminal investigation and prosecution.

PSYC A100 Introduction to Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major fields of psychology. It is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses.

SCIE A100 Introduction to the Sciences
1.00 crs.

This course is offered to students accepted into the Loyola summer Neuro Camp program. Students attend classes rotating in Biology, Computer Science, Physics, and Psychology. The focus is on how each discipline relates to neuroscience and includes lectures in conjunction with interactive lab activities. Each student is responsible for creating a research poster integrating what they have learned during the week and showcasing the poster to instructors and other observers. 

SOCI A100 Introductory Sociology
3.00 crs.

This introductory course focuses on the key concepts, theories, and methods that sociologists use to understand the social world. Readings, lectures, videos, and presentations are used to examine the role that culture, socialization, social inequality, and social institutions (e.g., family, education, government, economy, religion) play in shaping human behaviors and human interactions.

WMST A100 Women, Culture, & Society
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to the dominant cultural influences and societal institutions that shape women's lives today by structuring society along sex and gender lines. Readings and discussions focus on the ways in which gender intersects and interacts with other categories such as sex, race, ethnicity, class, and nation. The course explores the ways that feminist scholars, activists, and women throughout the world have pushed against cultural norms and mores to develop new paradigms for social organization and self-definition.

GREK A101 Beginning Greek II
3.00 crs.

GREK A100 continued.

or placement
LATN A101 Beginning Latin II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of LATN A100.

or placement
ARAB A101 First Year Arabic II
3.00 crs.

This course, a continuation of ARAB A100, expands students' vocabulary and use of basic grammatical structures. Lessons focus on the sound patterns of Arabic, with attention to mastery of scripts, pronunciation and listening comprehension.

or placement
GERM A101 First Year German II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of GERM A100 and further develops listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills.

or placement
ITAL A101 First Year Italian II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of Italian A100. Students further develop their listening comprehension, reading, speaking and writing skills. 

or placement
FREN A101 First-year French II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation in appropriation of the four basic skills with emphasis on correct pronunciation and the acquisition of fundamental vocabulary.

or placement
SPAN A101 First-year Spanish II
3.00 crs.

This is a continued study of the fundamental structure of the language that stresses the development of the four basic skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course also includes the study of culture in the Spanish-speaking world.

or placement
CRIM A101 Introduction to Law Enforcement
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the philosophical and historical background of law enforcement. The principles of organization and administration for functions and activities; planning and research; public relations; personnel and training; inspection and control; direction; and policy formation will be discussed.

PHYS A101 Introduction to Mechanics
4.00 crs.

This is a calculus-based introductory course in Newtonian mechanics intended for physical science and math majors.

Corequisites:
PHYS A102 Introduction to Electromagnetism and Relativity
4.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the electricity and magnetism culminating in an elementary treatment of Maxwell’s equations. Einstein’s special relativity is also discussed.

Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or permission of the Department Chair
CHEM A102 Introduction to Organic & Biological Chemistry
3.00 crs.

This is a 3-credit survey course of general, organic and biological chemistry with an emphasis on applications to the human body. Topics discussed include scientific measurement, atomic theory and structure, bonding, quantitative relationships in chemicals reactions, gases, solutions, electrolytes, organic functional groups and nomenclature, organic reactions, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, metabolism, nucleic acids, radiation and nuclear medicine as it relates to nursing students. 

PHYS A103 Mechanics Lab
1.00 crs.

This is a laboratory course illustrating concepts and phenomena in mechanics. It is intended for students enrolled in Introduction to Mechanics (PHYS A101). Lab fee $50

PHYS A104 Electricity and Magnetism Lab
1.00 crs.

This is a laboratory course illustrating concepts and phenomena in electricity and magnetism. It is intended for students enrolled in Introduction to EM and Relativity (PHYS A102). Lab fee: $50

Prerequisite
Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or permission of the Department Chair
ENVA A105 Foundations in Environmental Studies
3.00 crs.

Students explore the major questions of Environmental Studies through readings, class discussions, interaction with faculty and others working in the field, field observation, and through their own inquiry. This course is required of all Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors.

CHEM A105 General Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is the first half of a one-year course in the fundamental principles of general chemistry. This is the first chemistry course for all science majors and includes the development of modern atomic theory, chemical bonding and structure, and the nature of matter and physical states. Included is an introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics with a more thorough development of equilibria concepts. Descriptive chemistry is liberally sprinkled throughout the course.

Prerequisite
Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257 Calculus I, ACT score of 23 or higher / SAT score of 560 or higher, Completion of MATH A118 Pre-Calculus Math
CRIM A105 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the student to how the justice system works in America. It begins with a discussion of the underlying rationale for punishment of crime and then addresses all components of the criminal justice system including law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections. Topics discussed include police, role of the attorney, bail, criminal trial, sentencing, corrections, and post-conviction remedies.

SPST A105 Protocols of Learning
1.00 crs.

Designed to promote higher-level learning skills, this course demonstrates techniques with application to the student’s classwork. The course addresses taking notes, preparing for exams, and comprehension in reading. Individual conferences are provided to address the student’s specific need.

BIOL A106 Cells and Heredity
3.00 crs.

This course emphasizes the principles and concepts of chemical, cellular, and genetic processes common to all life. Topics include the scientific method, basic chemical concepts, macromolecules, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure, membrane structure, energy and metabolism, meiosis, mitosis, Mendelian inheritance, and the Central Dogma.
 

Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257 Calculus I or completion of MATH A257
CHEM A106 General Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of CHEM A105.

Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or permission of the Department Chair
BIOL A107 Cells and Heredity Lab
1.00 crs.

Students investigate the scientific method, basic chemical concepts, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, Mendelian inheritance, and the structure, function, and technological uses of DNA.  This laboratory course emphasizes student-designed experiments, data collection and analysis, oral and written presentation, and the use of the scientific literature.  Lab fee $100.

Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257 Calculus I
CHEM A107 General Chemistry I Laboratory
1.00 crs.

This lab involves experiments to accompany General Chemistry Lecture. One three-hour laboratory period per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
BIOL A108 Biology of Organisms
3.00 crs.

This course compares the functional biology of microbes, plants, and animals focusing on morphology, physiology, reproduction, development and natural history.

 

or permission of the Department Chair, Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites
BIOL A108 Biology of Organisms
3.00 crs.

This course compares the functional biology of microbes, plants, and animals focusing on morphology, physiology, reproduction, development and natural history.

 

or permission of the Department Chair, Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites
CHEM A108 General Chemistry II Laboratory
1.00 crs.

This lab involves experiments to accompany General Chemistry II Lecture and includes qualitative analysis.  Lab fee $100.

Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or permission of the Department Chair
BIOL A109 Biology of Organisms Lab
1.00 crs.

This course examines the diversity of life through field trips, demonstrations, dissections, and experimental activities. Form and function of microbes, plants, and animals are compared to demonstrate how organisms have adapted to their environments. Lab fee $100.
 

or permission of the Department Chair, Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites
Corequisites:
BIOL A109 Biology of Organisms Lab
1.00 crs.

This course examines the diversity of life through field trips, demonstrations, dissections, and experimental activities. Form and function of microbes, plants, and animals are compared to demonstrate how organisms have adapted to their environments. Lab fee $100.
 

or permission of the Department Chair, Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites
Corequisites:
MATH A110 Concepts in College Algebra
4.00 crs.

This course introduces the topics of college algebra focusing on a conceptual understanding and application algebra. Following a contemporary approach to mathematics education, this course includes exploration of real-world problems, group discussion of problems, and technological exploration of concepts with an emphasis on mathematical reasoning and communication. Course replaces MATH A117. Placement into MATH A110 is determined by ACT/SAT scores.

CRIM A110 Criminology: Fundamentals
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of basic topics and problems related to the discipline of criminology, such as the nature of crime in America and other countries crime statistics, and selected criminological theories. It serves as an introduction to the systematic study of crime, criminals, criminal behavior, and the criminal justice system.

PHYS A112 Physics Lab I
1.00 crs.

This is a laboratory course intended for pre-health and other students enrolled in Physics for Life Sciences (PHYS A115). In a two-semester sequence it covers phenomena in mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism and optics. Lab fee: $50

PHYS A113 Physics Lab II
1.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of PHYS A112. Lab fee: $50

Prerequisite
CHEM A115 Chemistry of the Crime Scene
3.00 crs.

Chemistry of the Crime Scene covers basic crime scene protocol (documentation, collection, chain of custody); presumptive testing for drugs, primer (gun shot) residue, and body fluids; and the chemistry of latent print development. No science background is required, but scientific curiosity is expected, and fundamental chemistry concepts will be covered. Course fee $100.

MATH A115 Introduction to Finite Mathematics
3.00 crs.

This course is designed to give social science, psychology, and business students an introduction to the necessary analytic and quantitative tools in mathematics. Topics include elementary matrix theory and linear programming, life science models, and an introduction to probability.

or placement
MATH A115 Introduction to Finite Mathematics
3.00 crs.

This course is designed to give social science, psychology, and business students an introduction to the necessary analytic and quantitative tools in mathematics. Topics include elementary matrix theory and linear programming, life science models, and an introduction to probability.

or placement
PHYS A115 Physics for Life Sciences I
3.00 crs.

The course discusses the principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, electricity, and fundamentals of atomic physics. In presenting these topics, the special interest of the biological sciences, pre-health, and the general education groups are kept in view.

Corequisites:
PHYS A116 Physics for Life Sciences II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of PHYS A115.

Corequisites:
MATH A116 Survey of Calculus
3.00 crs.

This course includes techniques in the calculus of algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions of one and two variables as met in the application fields of business, political science, and other social science disciplines.

or placement
MATH A118 Pre-calculus Mathematics
3.00 crs.

This course offers preparation for students who plan to take calculus, but need to build their proficiency in algebra and trigonometry.  Topics include exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or placement
CRIM A120 Introduction to Homeland Security
3.00 crs.

The organization and operation of United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is examined in detail covering major topics related to homeland security including a history and organization of DHS, a review of key legislation, laws, and directives, introduction to basic concepts of infrastructure protection, risk management, threat assessment and prioritization, jurisdiction and coordination between agencies (public and private agency interface, military and emergency agencies), and issues in communication and technical areas such as interconnectivity and interoperability.

PHYS A120 Introduction to Physics and Engineering
1.00 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the process and diversity of the fields of physics and engineering. It introduces students to the most common problem solving techniques used by scientists and engineers, with an emphasis on scientific problem solving and engineering design, ethical decision-making, teamwork, and effective communication.

ENGL A120 Magis Composition Enrichment
1.00 crs.

ENGL A120 offers enhanced instruction for Magis students enrolled in ENGL A100.

PHYS A195 Special Projects I
1.00 crs.

This course facilitates a wide range of options for study and outcomes. 

POLS A200 Comparative Government I
3.00 crs.

The first half of the course explores the concepts, theories, and approaches of comparative politics. The second half analyzes the domestic politics of Great Britain (includes Northern Ireland and Scotland), France, and Germany with a focus on how historical development has impacted the development of current political, cultural, and economic institutions.

FRSC A200 Criminalistics I: Crime Scene
3.00 crs.

This course serves as an overview of the techniques utilized in crime scene investigation. The student will be given information in the form of lectures and then apply what they have learned through hands-on laboratory exercises.  Students will learn the basic principles of recognition, documentation, collection, and preservation of the crime scene.  In addition, the course will provide an introduction to the techniques utilized in crime scene reconstruction and present complications attributed to specialized crime scenes.

SOCI A200 Cultural Anthropology
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the social and cultural diversity of groups living in different parts of the world. Using anthropological studies that have studied the social, symbolic, and material lives of people, the course seeks to explain how and why peoples’ behaviors are both similar and different. This course also examines the relationships between culture and economic systems, social structures, politics, and the environment.

MATH A200 Introduction to Linear Algebra
3.00 crs.

This course introduces topics in matrix algebra for applications that are basic to future coursework in mathematics. Topics include vector spaces, determinants, matrices, linear transformations, and eigenvectors.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A200 Introduction to Linear Algebra
3.00 crs.

This course introduces topics in matrix algebra for applications that are basic to future coursework in mathematics. Topics include vector spaces, determinants, matrices, linear transformations, and eigenvectors.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A200 Introduction to Linear Algebra
3.00 crs.

This course introduces topics in matrix algebra for applications that are basic to future coursework in mathematics. Topics include vector spaces, determinants, matrices, linear transformations, and eigenvectors.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A200 Introduction to Linear Algebra
3.00 crs.

This course introduces topics in matrix algebra for applications that are basic to future coursework in mathematics. Topics include vector spaces, determinants, matrices, linear transformations, and eigenvectors.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
FREN A200 Second-year French I
3.00 crs.

Development of basic language skills continues with emphasis on grammar and the acquisition and use of new vocabulary in cultural contexts. Reading and discussion of articles and other writings are undertaken with grammatical exercises and short compositions based on cultural topics.

or placement
SPAN A200 Second-year Spanish I
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on grammar and vocabulary development, continuing the advancement of the four basic skills: listening comprehension, conversation, reading, and composition, along with culture.

or placement
POLS A201 Comparative Government II
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on non-Western political and socioeconomic realities. The course analyzes the effects of colonial histories, relationships with the West, differences in sociopolitical transition, conflicts between traditional culture and globalization, variances in institutional development, and critical political challenges facing each country. The course focuses on diversity of global political experiences through an exploration of five countries that are in a current state of economic and political change—Brazil, South Africa, Iran, Russia, China.

FRSC A201 Criminalistics II: Crime Lab
3.00 crs.

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the crime laboratory and the role it plays within criminal investigations and the courtroom. The student will be provided with information through lectures and then given the opportunity to apply this knowledge during laboratory experiments. Specialized topics, within the crime laboratory, that are covered include physical and trace evidence, controlled dangerous substances and toxicology, fingerprints, serology and DNA, and quality assurance.

PHIL A201 Practical Logic
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to the application of practical logical techniques in the analysis and formulation of rational arguments. Topics include how to find premises and conclusions in an argument, definitions, informal fallacies, syllogisms, Venn diagrams, induction, and Mill’s methods.

FREN A201 Second-year French II
3.00 crs.

This course consists of readings and discussion in French of literary and cultural texts. Students write short essays based on the readings and demonstrate use of basic techniques of textual analysis through discussion and in writing.

or placement
SPAN A201 Second-year Spanish II
3.00 crs.

This course offers review and development of grammar, sentence structure, vocabulary, and reading skills, with an emphasis on intermediate conversation, composition, and culture.

or placement
HIST A202 Historian's Craft
3.00 crs.

This course serves as an introduction to the art and craft of history. Designed for incoming history majors and transfer students, the course will provide an introduction and overview of the important features of the historian’s craft from conceptualizing ideas to research methods, to critical reading and writing, to the philosophy of history, and to the basic concepts of historiography.

SPCH A204 Argumentation & Debate
3.00 crs.

This course explores inductive and deductive reasoning of bases of argumentative speaking. Evaluation of evidence is considered as well. Strategies for advocating and arguing positions will be honed as through the examination of reasoning in speeches, conversations, essays, and group deliberations. Students will prepare and present classroom presentations.

MATH A204 Discrete Math Structures
3.00 crs.

This course bridges infinitesimal calculus and the world of sets, relations, digraphs, lattices, logic, etc. Topics include algebraic flow chart language, syntax and semantics, isomorphisms and invariants, directed graphs, Boolean algebra, permutations and cyclic groups, polish expressions, etc.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A204 Discrete Math Structures
3.00 crs.

This course bridges infinitesimal calculus and the world of sets, relations, digraphs, lattices, logic, etc. Topics include algebraic flow chart language, syntax and semantics, isomorphisms and invariants, directed graphs, Boolean algebra, permutations and cyclic groups, polish expressions, etc.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A204 Discrete Math Structures
3.00 crs.

This course bridges infinitesimal calculus and the world of sets, relations, digraphs, lattices, logic, etc. Topics include algebraic flow chart language, syntax and semantics, isomorphisms and invariants, directed graphs, Boolean algebra, permutations and cyclic groups, polish expressions, etc.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A204 Discrete Math Structures
3.00 crs.

This course bridges infinitesimal calculus and the world of sets, relations, digraphs, lattices, logic, etc. Topics include algebraic flow chart language, syntax and semantics, isomorphisms and invariants, directed graphs, Boolean algebra, permutations and cyclic groups, polish expressions, etc.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
EMS A205 Emergency Medical Response Planning
3.00 crs.

The course provides an analysis of the players involved; coordination with governmental emergency management; legal requirements; employee disaster awareness and preparedness; disaster mitigation and response; business resumption considerations and public policy considerations and community outreach. 

FOST A205 Introduction to Food Studies
3.00 crs.

This course is designed to give students an overview of important contemporary issues in food studies, and a taste of a variety of ways to approach those issues. We will study the social, economic, psychological, and cultural impacts of food and cooking, in homes, schools, and professions, and the social contexts for our relationships with food.

CRIM A205 Police Supervision
3.00 crs.

This course examines supervisory methods and problems within the law enforcement organization and the implication of principles of human relations to effective performance, policy and procedure, field supervision, instruction and planning, supervisory reporting, and performance evaluation.

ENGL A205 Writing about Texts
3.00 crs.

This is the introductory composition course for English majors and minors substituting for ENGL T122; other interested students must receive permission from the department chair. It covers rhetorical, argumentative, and representational dimensions of literary and non-literary texts, and serves as a general introduction to the practice of literary criticism. 

Please note: ENGL-A205 is required of all English majors, regardless of AP or other credit by examination or of transfer credits equivalent to ENGL-T122. Students changing their majors to English who have already taken ENGL-T122 are still required to take A205. All such credits for ENGL-T122 will be counted as general elective credit for English majors.

PHIL A206 Introduction to Symbolic Logic
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the techniques of symbolic logic in argument analysis and to the science of logic as the analysis of formal deductive systems.

ENGL A206 Reading Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the basic tools needed to read and write about English and American poetry, including the concepts of genre, form, meter, figurative representation, and history.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A206 Reading Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the basic tools needed to read and write about English and American poetry, including the concepts of genre, form, meter, figurative representation, and history.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A207 Reading Film
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to reading films and gives some familiarity with film criticism.  Students focus on different aspects of film, such as mise en scene, acting, editing, sound, photography, and ideology in order to understand both the aesthetic and the political role film plays in modern life.

This course replaces ENGL A370, How To Read A Film

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A207 Reading Film
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to reading films and gives some familiarity with film criticism.  Students focus on different aspects of film, such as mise en scene, acting, editing, sound, photography, and ideology in order to understand both the aesthetic and the political role film plays in modern life.

This course replaces ENGL A370, How To Read A Film

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution
3.00 crs.

This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Students examine animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.

BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution
3.00 crs.

This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Students examine animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.

BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution
3.00 crs.

This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Students examine animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.

BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution
3.00 crs.

This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Students examine animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.

COSC A208 Information Systems Theory & Practice
3.00 crs.

This course provides an understanding of information systems and outlines the concepts of how IS can provide for competitive advantage. Different systems are presented. Design and implementation are discussed. Effect on business and society is studied.

ENGL A208 Writing from Sources
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the research process, evaluation of sources, and in-depth writing assignments with emphasis on primary research.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A208 Writing from Sources
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the research process, evaluation of sources, and in-depth writing assignments with emphasis on primary research.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
EMS A210 Emergency Medical Services Management
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the core functions of the emergency medical services (EMS) administrator and concepts associated with the administration of an EMS service. Areas of study include a broad overview of key elements including strategic planning, customer service, marketing, quality management, and data collection. Essential knowledge relevant to all aspects of the EMS profession is introduced, and assignments are provided to allow for application of these concepts.

FOST A210 Foundations in Food Systems and Commerce
3.00 crs.

How can we understand the system that brings food from the field to the plate? What characterizes our current food system? What alternatives have existed in the past and might exist in the future? This course will examine these questions, using a variety of investigative tools to better understand food systems and commerce.

TEAC A210 Learners with Special Needs
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the recognition of various exceptionalities among children.  Classroom and teaching modifications for inclusion of the special child into the regular class are emphasized.  Field experiences are included.

PHIL A210 Metaphysics
3.00 crs.

This course is an historical and theoretical examination of the question, "What does it mean to be?" or "What is reality, as distinct from mere appearance?" The course begins with a study of ancient philosophical explanations of reality and goes on to study the historical evolution of both the problem of metaphysics and its various resolutions.

CRIM A210 Police Administration
3.00 crs.

This course examines individual and group studies in the dynamics of law enforcement and administration, policy formation and decision making in management from a human relations and organizational point of view.  New paradigms of police organization and management are reviewed.

SOCI A210 Social Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course offers a broad survey of the various theories and perspectives advanced in social psychology, a field which bridges sociology and psychology and is primarily concerned with how individuals view and interact with one another in everyday life. Emphasis is placed on the scientific study of social behavior and experiences stemming from individuals’ participation in social groups, interaction with others, and the effects of the cultural environment and social structures on individuals. Topics include socialization, self and identity, attitudes and attitude change, conformity and deviance, social perception, social influence, social communication and group processes.

FOST A211 Foundations in Food Culture
3.00 crs.

This course examines the cultures of food, exploring how people use food to define themselves as individuals, groups, and societies, and how cultural concerns shape food. The course investigates the meaning and significance of food in different cultures, and how race, ethnicity gender, socioeconomic status and religion influence food choices.

ENGL A211 Introduction to Creative Writing
3.00 crs.

This is a multi-genre introductory course in the theory and practice of creative writing.  Students learn critical reading skills, writing skills, and the elements of creative writing by reading and analyzing a wide range of literature across genres including poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, and screenplay. Student work is read and critiqued in a workshop setting. Students complete a portfolio of revised original creative work.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A211 Introduction to Creative Writing
3.00 crs.

This is a multi-genre introductory course in the theory and practice of creative writing.  Students learn critical reading skills, writing skills, and the elements of creative writing by reading and analyzing a wide range of literature across genres including poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, and screenplay. Student work is read and critiqued in a workshop setting. Students complete a portfolio of revised original creative work.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A211 Introduction to Programming I
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to concepts and terminology in computer programming. Topics include interface builders and problem solving techniques in various programming environments. Emphasis is placed on the basics of software design and on elementary applications to Mathematics and other disciplines.

A higher level math course is accepted
COSC A211 Introduction to Programming I
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to concepts and terminology in computer programming. Topics include interface builders and problem solving techniques in various programming environments. Emphasis is placed on the basics of software design and on elementary applications to Mathematics and other disciplines.

A higher level math course is accepted
POLS A211 The American Presidency
3.00 crs.

This course is an examination of the American presidency in American government and politics. Emphasis is on interaction between the chief executive and other main national policy-makers, Congress, and the Supreme Court. The nature of presidential leadership, its development, and influence of personality on growth of the office receive special attention.

FOST A212 Foundations in Food Policy
3.00 crs.

Foundations in Food Policy addresses normative questions about food policy: how should we make decisions about our food system?; and descriptive questions about food policy: How do we make these decisions, in practice? The course looks at food policy through the perspectives of its stakeholders to investigate what food policy is and what it does.

COSC A212 Introduction to Programming II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of COSC A211. Topics include object-oriented programming, software development, and data structures such as stacks, queues, trees, lists and the further exploration of the applications of programming to Mathematics and other disciplines.

POLS A212 The Legislative Process
3.00 crs.

National, state, and local legislatures as lawmaking and political bodies are discussed with emphasis on the U.S. Congress. The course also concerns the legislative process including procedures, performance, and the role of the executive and parties and interest groups.

POLS A213 American Political Thought
3.00 crs.

This course is a roughly chronological survey of basic themes in American political thought, beginning with the 17th-century European origins of American political thought and extending to modern attempts to strike a balance between individual rights and social needs.

CRIM A213 Police Community Relations
3.00 crs.

This course examines factors contributing to friction or cooperation between law enforcement personnel and the community, with emphasis on ethnic and minority groups, political pressures, and cultural problems. Community organization and social responsibility of law enforcement is also discussed.

SOCI A215 Criminal Behavior
3.00 crs.

Criminology is the study of the patterns, causes, and responses to the wide range of human behavior defined as criminal. This course explores the empirical and theoretical dimensions of criminal behavior, with particular emphasis on the United States. The course is divided into three parts: (1) the definition and measurement of crime, (2) an overview of various psychological, biological, but mainly sociological explanations of criminality, and (3) an examination of various forms of crime and the application of criminological theories to them.

PHIL A215 Ethics
3.00 crs.

This course is an historical and problematic investigation of traditional ethical positions and texts, especially focusing on teleological, deontological theories, and virtue ethics and on contemporary responses to them. This course is cross-listed with PHIL-W252: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

POLS A215 Introduction to State and Local Politics
3.00 crs.

This course examines the role of the states and localities in the American federal system. Emphasis is on political cultures and styles, policy-making institutions, and the changes reshaping their place in American government.

RELS A215 The Pentateuch
3.00 crs.

The various theological traditions which comprise the Pentateuch and related writings are studied for their literary value, religious insights, and theological importance for their age and our own.

World Religions Major Course

RELS A216 Biblical Wisdom Literature
3.00 crs.

Proverbs, Koheleth, Job, Sirach, and Wisdom are studied in terms of their literary quality, philosophical and existential attitudes towards life, theological content, and intellectual relationship to the rest of scripture and the ancient Near Eastern intellectual tradition.

World Religions Major Course

COSC A217 Object-Oriented Programming
3.00 crs.

This course offers an introduction to object-oriented software design techniques and to problem-solving methods. Particular focus is on the object-oriented paradigm. Procedural abstractions, data abstraction, and complex data structures are covered within the OO paradigm. Students also examine the major phases of software development and design.

ENGL A217 Reading Historically I
3.00 crs.

This course provides a foundation in English literary history from the medieval period through the 17th century. Reading works across contiguous historical periods, students explore their significance in historical, formal, and aesthetic contexts, and we consider how contemporary critical approaches enhance our understanding of this material.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A217 Reading Historically I
3.00 crs.

This course provides a foundation in English literary history from the medieval period through the 17th century. Reading works across contiguous historical periods, students explore their significance in historical, formal, and aesthetic contexts, and we consider how contemporary critical approaches enhance our understanding of this material.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
POLS A218 Courts/Judges/Politics
3.00 crs.

The course examines the role of the judiciary in the governmental policy-making process at both the federal and state levels. Emphasis is placed on the role of political and social factors in the selection of judges and in judicial decision-making, as well as the interrelationship between law and politics in the American political and social systems.

CRIM A218 Criminal Procedure
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the formal process whereby the government seeks to convict and punish a person for a criminal offense. Special emphasis will be placed on appellate review, the law of search and seizure, interrogations, confessions, the use of informers and entrapment, pretrial procedures, and various doctrines applying the fourteenth amendment.

ENGL A218 Reading Historically II
3.00 crs.

This course explores developments in English literary history from 1700 to the present. Reading works across contiguous historical periods, we consider their significance in historical, formal, and aesthetic contexts, and we experiment with critical approaches to enhance our understanding of this material.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A218 Reading Historically II
3.00 crs.

This course explores developments in English literary history from 1700 to the present. Reading works across contiguous historical periods, we consider their significance in historical, formal, and aesthetic contexts, and we experiment with critical approaches to enhance our understanding of this material.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHIL A220 Epistemology
3.00 crs.

This course takes an historical and problematic approach to the problems of knowledge, with emphasis on the main theories of knowledge in ancient and modern philosophy as well as contemporary discussions of the nature of knowledge.

ENGL A220 Media and Mediation
3.00 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the means by which creative narratives are being re-interpreted through film and other digital media.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A220 Media and Mediation
3.00 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the means by which creative narratives are being re-interpreted through film and other digital media.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SOCI A220 Social Protest Movements
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on some of the major social movements, collective protests, and political conflicts that created significant social changes in the 20th and early 21st century. Through a sociological lens, such important movements as the Labor/Anarchist, Civil Rights, New Left, Women’s Liberation, Gay & Lesbian, Environmental, New Right, and Global Justice Movements are examined and the role they played in addressing many of the social problems and inequalities of U.S. society. A strong emphasis is also placed on how these movements helped create many of the democratic rights and legal protections we enjoy today. Students receive a strong social history and critical analysis of the material and view actual documentary film footage of key movement events.

POLS A220 The Urban Process
3.00 crs.

This course examines the nature of the modern city, with special attention to forces shaping the city, including the social, political, economic, ecological, and value systems which underlie the dynamics of urban life and culture. Attention is given to the various forms which cities have taken in the past and may take in the future.

ENGL A222 How to Do Things with Video Games
3.00 crs.

This course considers video games as a cultural form. It prepares students to analyze and compare the ways video games make meaning and participate in the social lives of their players.  It introduces students to critical discussions surrounding video games and some methodologies for interpreting them. 

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A222 How to Do Things with Video Games
3.00 crs.

This course considers video games as a cultural form. It prepares students to analyze and compare the ways video games make meaning and participate in the social lives of their players.  It introduces students to critical discussions surrounding video games and some methodologies for interpreting them. 

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A222 Psychology of Trauma and Disaster
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the study of psychological trauma, and the impact of natural and man-made disasters on mental health. Psychophysiological responses to traumatic events, factors that predict resilience vs. psychological distress, vulnerable populations and group responses to trauma, and social and cultural factors related to trauma victims are examined.

RELS A222 Religions of the World
3.00 crs.

This course surveys the history, literature, theology, practices and institutions of the world’s major living religions. It critically and comparatively assesses the patterns of behavior and organizational strategies that religions inspire.

World Religions Major Course

SOCI A222 Social Networks
3.00 crs.

This class is a forum for the discussion of the significance of social networks in everyday life. Given the rise of online social networks like Facebook and Twitter we are more aware of connections between people and the diffusion of innovations than ever before. However, there remains a tendency to think that societies are just collections of independent individuals. In this class we will challenge that assumption and consider to what extent humans are like schools of fish, led by those around us. In the first half of the class we explore various structural properties of networks and consider the value of looking at connections themselves. In the second half of the class we consider how these connections might influence political life, health, crime, inequalities, and other outcomes.

RELS A224 Christianity and Society
3.00 crs.

This course surveys the history, literature, core theology and doctrines of Christianity as well as the significant persons and formative events that shaped and continue to shape Christianity from its origins to its influence on contemporary society.

Christianity Major Course

POLS A224 Inside the Supreme Court
3.00 crs.

The course examines the workings of the Supreme Court, including the process of selecting and deciding cases, the nomination and confirmation of Justices, and key players (e.g. litigants, attorneys, and interest groups) who interact with the Court.

PHIL A225 Philosophy of Law
3.00 crs.

This course is an inquiry into the nature of law, the relevance of law to morality, the concepts of responsibility in the law, punishment, and the relevance to law of the concepts of justice, equality, and liberty. The philosophical assumptions that underlie criminal law and private law are explored. Readings are taken from classical and recent philosophers of law.

POLS A226 The Bill of Rights
3.00 crs.

This course examines the nature and scope of civil liberties in America by focusing on the U.S. Constitution’s chief source of fundamental liberties–the Bill of Rights. Major topics of discussion include origins and antecedents; the incorporation debate; and Supreme Court interpretations (and limitations) of fundamental freedoms.

PSYC A230 Developmental Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course covers the development of behavior and psychological activity through the prenatal period, infancy, childhood, adolescence, maturity, and old age with emphasis on the normal person.

POLS A230 History of Political Thought I
3.00 crs.

This course approaches the development of political thought from a traditional view, employing cultural and intellectual history and traditional philosophy to review the social, historical, and political contexts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, and others.

SOCI A230 Sociology of Education
3.00 crs.

This course considers formal education from kindergarten through college admission. Students are asked to consider how variation within and between schools affects individuals and society and how the experience of schooling varies by race, class and gender. A central question of the course is whether educational institutions perpetuate patterns of inequality and rigidity in the stratification system or whether they promote opportunity. The course also considers how schools are organized and addresses how sociological perspectives can inform debates about school reform.

POLS A231 History of Political Thought II
3.00 crs.

This course utilizes the same approach of POLS A230, but covers the period from 1500 to the present. It includes considerable discussion of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Bentham, Mill, Hegel, and Marx.

PSYC A235 Abnormal Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of psychological disorders with emphasis on clinical "picture," explanatory theories, and etiological research. Intervention procedures are briefly addressed.

POLS A235 Gender and Global Politics
3.00 crs.

This course aims to familiarize students with the main theories and debates about gender and sexuality in order to highlight citizenship as a gendered, sexed, raced, and nationalized phenomenon. This course analyses individuals’ claims for citizenship in a variety of contexts, the limitations and struggle to challenge the ideological, political and material conditions of citizenship, and the role of international actors, social movements, and formal politics.

HIST A235 Seminar in Global Issues
3.00 crs.

This course is open to all students by invitation who want the challenge of engaging macro questions of the human experience within the context of different moral and political values. The course is limited to 20 students and then only to second-semester freshmen through first-semester seniors. The seminar is intended to prepare Loyola’s most able students for success in scholarship and fellowship competitions.

RELS A236 Hebrew Prophets
3.00 crs.

The message of the Hebrew Prophets, with its religious, social, political, and economic implications, is studied in order to see its relationship with the rest of the Scriptures and the development of prophetic criticism which continues into our own age.

World Religions Major Course

PHYS A240 Introduction to Waves and Quantum Physics
4.00 crs.

This is a sophomore-level course that describes wave physics and introduces basic concepts of quantum physics. It is a lecture/lab course and the students perform 3-4 experiments in a wave and quantum physics laboratory, in addition to regular classroom meetings.

PHYS A240 Introduction to Waves and Quantum Physics
4.00 crs.

This is a sophomore-level course that describes wave physics and introduces basic concepts of quantum physics. It is a lecture/lab course and the students perform 3-4 experiments in a wave and quantum physics laboratory, in addition to regular classroom meetings.

PSYC A240 Social Psychology
3.00 crs.

Social determinants of individual behavior and of group interaction are examined with emphasis on current research literature.

COSC A241 Computing Ethics
3.00 crs.

This course mixes ethical theory with case study analysis to introduce students to ethics questions and theories that can help them to make ethically sound decisions in their professional, personal, and social experiences with computing. Starting with a few motivating current events, the course covers major ethical perspectives, and then introduces key ethical issues related to networked communications, intellectual property, information privacy, computer and network security, computer and software reliability, professional ethics, and workplace fairness, health, and the impacts of job automation.

MATH A241 Introduction to Probability and Statistics I
3.00 crs.

This course introduces statistical concepts and applications in the natural and social sciences that are related to environmental issues.  Emphasis is placed on methods of data analysis, normal distributions, statistical inference, special distributions, regression, and analysis of variance.

PHYS A241 Introduction to Thermal Physics
3.00 crs.

This is a sophomore-level course that introduces the basic thermodynamic concepts of temperature, heat, and entropy. Classical thermodynamics as well as statistical mechanics are covered.

PHYS A241 Introduction to Thermal Physics
3.00 crs.

This is a sophomore-level course that introduces the basic thermodynamic concepts of temperature, heat, and entropy. Classical thermodynamics as well as statistical mechanics are covered.

ENGL A241 Modern Nonfiction
3.00 crs.

This course provides a history and survey of American creative nonfiction, with the emphasis on its development into a major genre in the second half of the twentieth century.  Assignments focus on both writing nonfiction as well as crafting critical analyses of its techniques, themes, and impact.  

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A241 Modern Nonfiction
3.00 crs.

This course provides a history and survey of American creative nonfiction, with the emphasis on its development into a major genre in the second half of the twentieth century.  Assignments focus on both writing nonfiction as well as crafting critical analyses of its techniques, themes, and impact.  

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A241 Psychology of Personal Adjustment
3.00 crs.

Good personal adjustment is defined as the effective solution of individual problems and the creation of a viable system of personal values. The constraints and conditions affecting these behaviors are examined in this course.

ENGL A242 Contemporary Nonfiction
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to contemporary nonfiction writing in a variety of forms including autobiography, travel writing, and the personal essay.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A242 Contemporary Nonfiction
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to contemporary nonfiction writing in a variety of forms including autobiography, travel writing, and the personal essay.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A242 Introduction to Cybersecurity
3.00 crs.

A broad survey course intended for undergraduate students in any major: Students are provided with a road map for approaching this field from multiple standpoints—computer science, business administration, criminal justice, or other disciplines. Students learn the mechanisms needed to ensure the fundamentals of information security. The course will present security for personal systems, enterprise systems, and internet use. Students learn to delineate the many different types of threats and vulnerabilities, and to characterize noteworthy recent failures in information security.

SOCI A242 Sociology of Mardi Gras
3.00 crs.

This course teaches students how to use a sociological perspective to examine one of the cultural events most associated with New Orleans, the annual celebration of Mardi Gras. In addition to studying Mardi Gras as a cultural practice, students explore deviant behavior as well as race, class, and gender stratification, along with the political economy of Mardi Gras, both locally and globally. Students also compare and contrast the work of several sociologists who have studied Mardi Gras, giving them exposure to different methodologies as they critique the research others have done.

COSC A243 Corporate Cybersecurity Strategy
3.00 crs.

Cybersecurity is as much a set of human practices as technical ones. Responsible handling of information assets—let alone ethical handling—demands a consistent approach whether an organization is a transnational corporation or a sole proprietorship. This course teaches students to implement security policies to support organizational goals. We discuss methodologies for identifying, quantifying, mitigating, and controlling security risks, as well as disaster recovery. Student also learn about laws, regulations, and standards relating to information security and privacy, and how they affect IT organizations.

 

MATH A245 Calculus for Life Sciences
3.00 crs.

This course is designed for pre-health majors and will cover fundamentals of differential calculus along with applications whose primary motivation are biological. Topics will include limits, derivatives, population models, and exponential growth as it pertains to epidemiology. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze some basic discrete dynamical systems and understand how they arise in biological systems; utilize and interpret with allometric models; grasp the informal ideas of limits, continuity, and differentiation; employ techniques of differentiation (product, quotient, and chain rules); and use differentiation to solve optimization problems. 

Prerequisite requirements include successful completion of MATH A118 Pre-Calculus Mathematics with a grade of C- or better, or placement through ACT, SAT, or ALEKS exam scores.  

Completion of MATH A118 Pre-Calculus Math, Math Placement
ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the student to modern short fiction, beginning with Chekhov. The emphasis is on authors writing in languages other than English.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the student to modern short fiction, beginning with Chekhov. The emphasis is on authors writing in languages other than English.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A250 Educational Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of psychological principles as applied to the field of education including growth and development, cognitive abilities, motivation, learning and individual differences. Emphasis is placed on the role of diversity in education. An understanding of developmental psychology and theories of learning is crucial whether the goals of the student are in applied psychology (e.g., clinical, school), education (e.g., teaching, administration), or related fields (e.g., social work, speech therapy). Topics covered in this course include theories of development and learning, legal and multicultural issues in education, and material on applied educational practices.

GREK A250 Intermediate Greek
3.00 crs.

Intermediate Greek is a continuation of the Beginning Greek A100/101 series; it focuses on allowing students to acquire knowledge and facility of more complex syntactical structures while encouraging them to continue to build their vocabulary and translation skills. As the course progresses, students make the transition from adapted to unadapted texts and are introduced to intermediated and advanced level commentaries, dictionaries, and grammars.

LATN A250 Intermediate Latin
3.00 crs.

In this course, students enhance their understanding of the basics of Latin grammar and syntax and increase their knowledge of Latin vocabulary in preparation for reading Latin literature. Readings are drawn from both prose and poetry in order to prepare students for advanced courses in Latin authors.

or placement
CRIM A250 Juvenile Delinquency
3.00 crs.

This course explores the nature and causes of juvenile crime and delinquency in America and other cultures. An in-depth analysis of crime measurement, causes, controls, and treatment are examined. Other topics include juvenile law, corrections, family therapy, gangs, schools, and the influence of the mass media on juvenile crime and delinquency.

SOCI A250 The Sociology of Gender
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the constraints that the social construction of gender imposes on both men and women in our gender-stratified society. The emphasis of this course is on developing a critical, empirically-based understanding of the structural and historical foundations affecting men and women in society.

PSYC A255 Adolescent Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course examines salient issues concerning adolescent development. The focus is on adolescent development as influenced by diverse contexts. Particular attention is given to the challenges and strengths associated with adolescent development in and around urban contexts. The course format includes lectures and discussion.

RELS A255 Gospels of Jesus
3.00 crs.

After a brief introduction to the question of the literary genre of the gospel, the course deals with the different theologies of the first three gospels as they relate to the social concerns of the communities to which they were addressed.

Christianity Major Course

ENGL A255 Intro to Shakespeare
3.00 crs.

This courses acts as a student's introduction to Shakespearean drama. In addition to covering the cultural and thematic content of the plays, close attention is given to Shakespeare's use of the visual, spatial, and temporal elements of stagecraft that distinguish his drama as a performance art.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A255 Intro to Shakespeare
3.00 crs.

This courses acts as a student's introduction to Shakespearean drama. In addition to covering the cultural and thematic content of the plays, close attention is given to Shakespeare's use of the visual, spatial, and temporal elements of stagecraft that distinguish his drama as a performance art.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CRIM A255 Juvenile Justice Process
3.00 crs.

This course examines of the major decisions made about juveniles from initial contact by the police through termination of legal control over their conduct. Constitutional limitations on the power of the juvenile justice process as a result of recent Supreme Court decisions, case law developments, and statutory changes will be reviewed.

SOCI A255 The Sociology of Sexualities
3.00 crs.

This course examines the social construction of sexuality, sexual identities, and the influence of society on sexual behaviors, including societal attempts at regulating sexuality and the ways gender influences sexual attitudes and behaviors. Particular attention is given to the emergence of queer identities, politics, and activism. Finally, the course critically interrogates heterosexism, homophobia, compulsory heterosexuality, and globalization and sexual commodification.

MATH A257 Calculus I
4.00 crs.

This is a beginning course in the calculus of one variable and analytic geometry. The concept of limits and their use in differential and integral calculus, max and min values of functions, and solving for areas and volumes are treated.

Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or placement, or permission of the Department Chair
MATH A258 Calculus II
4.00 crs.

Topics include the Mean Value Theorem and its applications, applications of the integral, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, sequences and series, and conic sections.

Prerequisite
MATH A259 Calculus III
3.00 crs.

This course addresses the calculus of several variables and vector analysis. Topics include differentiation of vector valued functions, extreme values, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, and an introduction to vector fields.

MATH A259 Calculus III
3.00 crs.

This course addresses the calculus of several variables and vector analysis. Topics include differentiation of vector valued functions, extreme values, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, and an introduction to vector fields.

MATH A260 Statistical Inference for Scientists
3.00 crs.

This is a course in statistical methods for science students. Emphasis centers on the practical application of statistical inference and estimation in the quest for scientific knowledge. Topics include exploratory data analysis, techniques for data collection, summarization, and presentation, graphical techniques and numerical measures, the role of the Normal distribution, regression and correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, and distribution-free methods.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted, or placement
MATH A260 Statistical Inference for Scientists
3.00 crs.

This is a course in statistical methods for science students. Emphasis centers on the practical application of statistical inference and estimation in the quest for scientific knowledge. Topics include exploratory data analysis, techniques for data collection, summarization, and presentation, graphical techniques and numerical measures, the role of the Normal distribution, regression and correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, and distribution-free methods.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted, or placement
MATH A260 Statistical Inference for Scientists
3.00 crs.

This is a course in statistical methods for science students. Emphasis centers on the practical application of statistical inference and estimation in the quest for scientific knowledge. Topics include exploratory data analysis, techniques for data collection, summarization, and presentation, graphical techniques and numerical measures, the role of the Normal distribution, regression and correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, and distribution-free methods.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted, or placement
MATH A260 Statistical Inference for Scientists
3.00 crs.

This is a course in statistical methods for science students. Emphasis centers on the practical application of statistical inference and estimation in the quest for scientific knowledge. Topics include exploratory data analysis, techniques for data collection, summarization, and presentation, graphical techniques and numerical measures, the role of the Normal distribution, regression and correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, and distribution-free methods.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted, or placement
CRIM A260 Statistics in Criminal Justice
3.00 crs.

This course examines descriptive, inferential and multivariate statistics employed in criminology and criminal justice research about the nature of crimes, criminals, and the criminal justice system. Statistical packages such as SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) are employed in the course to aid students in the calculation and interpretation of key statistical techniques commonly employed in the field.

MATH A261 Statistical Inference for Scientists Lab
1.00 crs.

Optional lab accompaniment for Math A260.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A261 Statistical Inference for Scientists Lab
1.00 crs.

Optional lab accompaniment for Math A260.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A261 Statistical Inference for Scientists Lab
1.00 crs.

Optional lab accompaniment for Math A260.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CRIM A262 Statistics in Criminal Justice Lab
1.00 crs.

This lab is a co-requisite for CRIM A260 Statistics in Criminal Justice and provides an opportunity to apply the skills learned in the class. The lab focuses on the identification of statistical techniques in the criminological and criminal justice literature, explanation for the use of specific techniques and interpretation of quantitative results.

ENGL A270 History of Film
3.00 crs.

History of Film is an introduction to the rich history and legacy of the motion picture as a commercial art form. The goal of the course is to educate students on the major figures and developments in cinema. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of major events, figures, and films in the history of cinema and will be comfortable with writing about film as a narrative art.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A270 History of Film
3.00 crs.

History of Film is an introduction to the rich history and legacy of the motion picture as a commercial art form. The goal of the course is to educate students on the major figures and developments in cinema. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of major events, figures, and films in the history of cinema and will be comfortable with writing about film as a narrative art.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A270 Introduction to Relational Databases
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the concepts and terminology of databases. The concepts discussed during the lectures are illustrated by a number of hands-on exercises based on the Microsoft Access database software.

CRIM A270 Murder, Mayhem, and the Media
3.00 crs.

The course explores the relationship of the mass media to our perception of crime, criminals, and the criminal justice system. The mass media generate a "social construction of reality" that influences public opinion, public policies, and general social attitudes toward violence. The print and electronic media, including the internet, are examined as purveyors of social perceptions of criminals, victims, law enforcers, lawyers, judges, prisoners, and the like.

MATH A271 Applied Scientific Computing
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to techniques and methods commonly used by scientists to analyze, build models, visualize and make decisions based on data collected in laboratory and field experiments. It emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of scientific computing by applying the mathematical tools of statistics and numerical computations to hands on experiments from diverse areas of science.

or permission of instructor
MATH A271 Applied Scientific Computing
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to techniques and methods commonly used by scientists to analyze, build models, visualize and make decisions based on data collected in laboratory and field experiments. It emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of scientific computing by applying the mathematical tools of statistics and numerical computations to hands on experiments from diverse areas of science.

or permission of instructor
CRIM A275 Deviant Behavior
3.00 crs.

This course critically examines the nature and extent of deviant behavior in complex, industrial societies. Particular attention will be given to the causes and consequences of deviant behavior and to the social relations and processes associated with the more common forms of deviant and criminal expression within America and other societies.

CRIM A280 Domestic Violence
3.00 crs.

The course examines the dynamics of violent relationships, theories of domestic violence, and reactions to domestic violence by the family, media, community and, more extensively, the criminal justice system. Although the course will be focused on intimate partner violence, special topics will also be covered including elder abuse, sexual assault, same sex partner violence, victimization in minority and immigrant populations, stalking, and lethal intimate partner violence.

COSC A280 Introduction to Computer Graphics
3.00 crs.

This course familiarizes students with basic aspects of computer graphics: Topics include Java 2D fundamentals, geometry, painting, stroking, interactivity, color theory, animation, and affine transforms.

Sophomore
VISA A280 Watercolor
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to painting with transparent watercolor and gouache from still life, landscape, and figurative subjects. Relevant historical examples of work in this medium as well as contemporary approaches to it will be examined. Lab fee $100. 

Open to all students
CRIM A285 Crisis Intervention
3.00 crs.

This course is a discussion and analysis of crisis intervention as a therapeutic tool in community mental health. Emphasis will be on suicide, crisis lines, counseling, and managing hostile interactions.

SOCI A285 Sociology of Disaster
3.00 crs.

This course offers a critical introduction to the field of disaster research, with a particular emphasis on the differential risks and socio-environmental impacts associated with various natural and technological disasters today. Traumatic responses to hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and tsunamis are examined, as well as oil spills, rig blowouts, levee failures, toxic contamination, nuclear plant accidents, and other catastrophes of the modern age. Special attention is paid to recent events such as The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, Hurricane Katrina, and the BP Oil Disaster in the Gulf.

CRIM A288 Crime and Disaster
3.00 crs.

Disaster events cause sudden disruption to a community. There is growing evidence that people may engage in what we call anti-social behavior. Therefore, we need to consider what we can do to better understand when and where these behaviors may occur, and how we can prevent crime after disaster. We will begin by interrogating what the definition of a disaster event is, as this is not an agree upon concept in the multidisciplinary field. We will also study how the different phases of disaster relate to criminal activity in the disaster context. We will investigate a number of case studies from the perspectives of sociologists, criminologists, and law enforcement officials who have had direct experience researching and working in disaster situations. Then, we will examine specific criminal activity, such as looting, sexual assault, fraud, the illegal drug market, and hate crimes. Finally, we will look at how the criminal justice system responds to crime in the wake of disaster.

PHYS A295 Special Projects II
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course facilitates a wide range of options for study and outcomes. 

FREN A300 Advanced Grammar and Composition
3.00 crs.

This course reviews intensively the structure of the language and of idiomatic expressions. Daily translations and frequent original compositions are required.

or placement
POLS A300 Constitutional Law I
3.00 crs.

Discussions include the origins of constitutionalism and the framing of the U.S. Constitution; nature and scope of judicial review; sources and nature of legislative and executive power; the commerce power and state power to regulate; and introduction to 14th Amendment due process.

GREK A300 Homeric Greek
3.00 crs.

Students in this course read selections from Homer and Hesiod as well as selections from the Homeric Hymns. Study includes examination of the epic meter and the impact of the epic poets on subsequent literature.

or equivalent
RELS A300 Letters of Paul: Radical Faith
3.00 crs.

This course explores the development of Paul’s thought through his epistles, focusing on major themes such as sin, justification, faith, and the body of Christ. Influences on his thought such as Hellenistic philosophical and theological speculations and rabbinic theologizing are also considered.

Christianity Major Course

BIOL A300 Microbiology
3.00 crs.

This course examines the structure, function, metabolism, ecology, and pathogenesis of viruses, arachaea, bacteria and eukaryotic microbes.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
CHEM A300 Organic Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

In this first semester organic course, students learn the concepts and skills necessary to have a strong foundation in organic chemistry. This course includes: drawing, visualizing, and describing in words the bonding motifs and interactions in organic chemistry; showing how acid base chemistry relates to structure and reactions; applying kinetics and thermodynamics to reactions; showing the mechanistic path for reactions and applying these concepts to functional groups.

or permission of the Department Chair
PHIL A300 Philosophy of Science
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to basic themes of recent philosophy of science including scientific methodology, concepts and presuppositions. Through an examination of different models of scientific explanation, the course exposes students to problems of justifying scientific theories, and the relationship between theories and reality.

CRIM A300 Research Methods– Criminology
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on research in the fields of criminology and criminal justice and includes developing a theoretical explanation for why problems exist, techniques of literature review, methodological designs, collecting information that will verify or refute the explanation of problems, and then analyzing, presenting and interpreting this information. Specific techniques for data collection, analysis, and presentation will be covered in the course.

TEAC A300 Secondary School Methods I
3.00 crs.

This course investigates various methods of teaching secondary school students. It encompasses planning, organization and teaching strategies. Field experiences are included.

Senior, Students must apply for teaching residency and receive permission from the Office of Teacher Education the semester before they take the teaching residency and methods class.
Corequisites:
SPAN A300 Syntax and Composition
3.00 crs.

This course is an intensive study of grammar, sentence structure, and translation difficulties, with extensive written practice in Spanish. Various texts, including film, are used for discussion and stylistic models.

or placement
FREN A301 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics
3.00 crs.

In this course, students acquire an extensive working vocabulary and fluency through conversation, reading, and discussion of cultural texts. French phonetics and its application to the improvement of pronunciation are also studied.

or placement
POLS A301 Constitutional Law II
3.00 crs.

This course discusses individual rights and liberties, with emphasis on post-1937 developments in areas of First Amendment and 14th Amendment equal protection.

FRSC A301 Criminalistics III: Controlled Substances
3.00 crs.

The course reviews the broad area of drugs or chemicals whose manufacture, possession, or use  are regulated by the government and subject to legislative control. Topics covered include drug identification, drug dependency, drug effects, and forensic toxicology.

SPAN A301 Intensive Conversation
3.00 crs.

This course places an emphasis on oral expression with exercises to provide students with a working knowledge of conversational Spanish. This course is open only to non-native speakers.

or equivalent
PSYC A301 Introduction to Research
3.00 crs.

This course concerns the application of scientific methods to psychology with emphasis on designing research and on report writing.

Prerequisites: 9 crs. in PSYC
BIOL A301 Microbiology Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A300 and provides students with skills needed to isolate, identify and study the form and function of microorganisms.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
CHEM A301 Organic Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

In this second semester organic course, students build upon the concepts of Organic 1 (A300) This includes: showing the mechanistic path for more advanced reactions; identifying and suggesting reagents, starting materials, and products for multi-step syntheses of organic compounds; writing about scientific topics; using NMR, IR, and Mass spectroscopy to identify organic compounds and applying all of these concepts to functional groups.

Corequisites: either CHEM A311 Organic Chemistry II Lab or CHEM A314 (Advanced) Synthesis & Characterization. 

Grade of C- or higher in CHEM A300 or permission of department chair
CHEM A302 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory for Chemistry Majors
2.00 crs.

This two-credit-hour laboratory course for chemistry majors accompanies CHEM A300. Students combine knowledge with practical skills in this course by purifying, synthesizing, and identifing organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, organic reactions, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, melting point and NMR. Students learn to keep a lab notebook and to write a formal lab write-up. There are two, three-hour laboratory periods per week.  Lab fee $100.

Students may substitute CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 for CHEM A302. 

CRIM A302 Research Methods in Criminology Lab
1.00 crs.

This lab is a co-requisite for CRIM A300 Research Methods in Criminology and provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge from class. The lab focuses on the description of and explanation for methodological approaches in the criminological and criminal justice literature, as well as on identification of strengths, weaknesses and alternative techniques. 

BIOL A303 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates
3.00 crs.

This course uses lectures, readings, demonstrations, and discussions to compare the diversity, form and function of vertebrates.

Biology core courses
PSYC A303 Statistics and Methods
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on descriptive and inferential statistics. This course stresses the analysis and interpretation of data, frequency distribution analysis, tests of significance, correlational methods, analysis of variance, and selected nonparametric tests.

College level Mathematics prerequisite also satisfied by exam-based exemptions as outlined by university Math Placement regulations

One college-level math course
BIOL A304 Comparative Anatomy–Vertebrate Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A303 and provides students with skills needed to dissect, analyze and compare anatomical adaptations in major groups of vertebrates.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
LATN A304 Prose of Republican Rome
3.00 crs.

This course surveys works of prose writers who lived during the Roman Republic. Authors such as Cato, Nepos, Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero provide insight into key political figures and military action of the Republic and offer a variety of writing styles. 

or placement
BIOL A305 Histology
2.00 crs.

The study of the microscopic structure of tissues and organs of the mammalian body and the study of the fundamentals of hematology are the focus of this course. 

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
SPAN A305 Introduction to Hispanic Literature
3.00 crs.

This course offers readings and discussion of literature in Spanish, including narrative, poetry, drama, and the essay.  Students learn the necessary tools and skills to conduct literary analysis in Spanish.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A305 Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2.00 crs.

This laboratory course is for non-majors. Students combine knowledge with practical skills in this course by purifying, synthesizing, and identifying organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, organic reactions, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, and melting point. Students learn to keep a lab notebook. There are two, three-hour laboratory periods per week.  Lab fee $100.

Students may substitute CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 for CHEM A305. 

LATN A305 Poetry of Republican Rome
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the works of poets who lived during the Roman Republic (509 B.C. to 31 B.C.) and includes selected readings from the works of Plautus, Terence, Lucretius, and Catullus. Assignments focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these poets to the times in which they lived.

or equivalent
POLS A305 Political Parties and Pressure Groups
3.00 crs.

This course involves party system, theory, and practice on national, state, and local levels; nominations, conventions, etc.; major pressure groups; methods used to mobilize public opinion; and the influence of pressure groups on government.

RELS A305 Theology of Liberation
3.00 crs.

Liberation theology is a facet of Catholic theology relating to Jesus Christ’s views of liberation from unjust conditions. The course covers a wide range of topics under this multi-disciplinary and unique way of viewing and practicing theology. Significant focus is placed upon understanding how the Latin American context impacts theological praxis. This course is cross-listed with LAS-A305: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Christianity Major Course

LAS A305 Theology of Liberation
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the historical development of the theology of liberation in Latin America and explores the relevance of its themes to the current situation in the region and in Latino communities in the US. This course is cross-listed with RELS-A305: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

BIOL A306 Histology Lab
2.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A305.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor
ENGL A306 Professional Writing
3.00 crs.

This course explores the art of generating texts in professional settings. This class focuses on the writing skills necessary to produce clear, concise, appropriate, and well organized writing on the job. We will be examining audience awareness, different document formats, and the impact of technology on writing practices. Throughout this eight-week course, we will work on harnessing your attention to detail, organizing documents, revising, and creating texts written towards your intended audience.

ENGL A306 Professional Writing
3.00 crs.

This course explores the art of generating texts in professional settings. This class focuses on the writing skills necessary to produce clear, concise, appropriate, and well organized writing on the job. We will be examining audience awareness, different document formats, and the impact of technology on writing practices. Throughout this eight-week course, we will work on harnessing your attention to detail, organizing documents, revising, and creating texts written towards your intended audience.

TEAC A306 Secondary School Methods II
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on methodology specific to the student’s major content area in which they will be certified.  Field experiences are included.

Senior
Corequisites:
PHIL A307 Philosophy of Mind
3.00 crs.

This course examines different theories of the nature of mind beginning with an examination of the traditional mind-body problem in the works of Descartes. It subsequently explores alternative positions that have been presented by Descartes’ contemporaries in the classical period, as well as modern contemporaries. Emphasis is placed on such areas as mind-body identity/interaction, brain process, language, perception, sensation, emotion, personal identity, and free will.

CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

or permission of instructor
BIOL A308 Developmental Biology
3.00 crs.

Events and mechanisms of developmental genetics, gametogenesis, fertilization, morphogenesis, and organogenesis in selected vertebrates and invertebrates are examined. The laboratory includes experimental approaches to the study of development.

Biology core courses
CHEM A308 Physical Chemistry I Lab
1.00 crs.

This course is the accompanying lab for CHEM A306 which includes a survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

or permission of instructor, Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
BIOL A309 Developmental Biology Lab
1.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A308.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
PHIL A309 Naturalism and Its Critics
3.00 crs.

The natural sciences present an admirable model for knowledge.  But naturalism (the idea that nature as understood by the sciences is all there is) can seem ill-equipped to explain some important phenomena (including values and consciousness).  This class evaluates naturalism by considering naturalist, anti-naturalist, and compromise views.

CHEM A309 Physical Chemistry II Lab
1.00 crs.

This course is the accompanying lab for CHEM A307 which is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics

or permission of instructor, Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
CRIM A310 Community Policing
3.00 crs.

The course examines community-oriented policing, which represents a significant departure from the traditional, centralized model of policing. Topics covered include the growth of networking, online crime reporting, crime mapping, the development of the COMPSTAT process, the development of intranets within police organizations, police web pages, e-commerce transactions, and the opening of doors to new levels of police-citizen communications.

MATH A310 Introduction to Differential Equations
3.00 crs.

This course examines the fundamental methods of solving elementary differential equations. Topics include exact solutions, series solutions, numerical solutions and solutions using Laplace transforms.

Prerequisite
POLS A310 Money and American Politics
3.00 crs.

This course examines the flow of money in elections and through government institutions.  It begins with the study of federal campaign finance policies and their consequences for politicians and citizens.  It then moves to the study of the politics and procedures of government budgets, including taxation and appropriation.  Each student will then complete a research project that follows and explains the path of federal dollars to a public or private cause in the state of Louisiana.

CHEM A310 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
1.00 crs.

This laboratory course accompanies CHEM A300, and is only taught in the summer. Loyola Chemistry majors must complete CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 to fulfill the CHEM A302 or CHEM A305 requirement. 

In this course, students combine knowledge with practical skills by purifying, synthesizing, and identifying organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, and melting point. Students also learn how to keep a lab notebook. There are three-hour laboratory periods four days per week.  Lab fee $100.

RELS A310 Religions of Asia
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the history and contemporary status of at least two of the following religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, the Chinese religious tradition, and Islam.

World Religions Major Course

SOCI A310 Social Policy
3.00 crs.

The policy-making process and implementation are affected by many factors---sociological, economic, and political.  This course adopts an inter-disciplinary approach to study how social policies are designed and to understand how policy is or is not adopted. Specific policy areas are  selected to study in-depth how social factors combine to shape social policies and their effects.

SPAN A310 Survey of Spanish Literature I
3.00 crs.

This course offers literary readings from Spain. Texts from the Middle Ages through the Golden Age/Baroque period are used.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SPAN A310 Survey of Spanish Literature I
3.00 crs.

This course offers literary readings from Spain. Texts from the Middle Ages through the Golden Age/Baroque period are used.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
TEAC A310 Teaching Reading in Secondary Schools
3.00 crs.

This course is designed for any teacher in the secondary schools, grades 6 – 12. Remedial, corrective, and developmental procedures, “How to Read” in subject matter areas, and teaching materials will be covered.  Field experiences are included.

CHEM A311 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
1.00 crs.

This one-credit-hour laboratory course accompanies CHEM A301, and is only taught in the summer. Loyola Chemistry majors must complete CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 to fulfill the CHEM A302 or CHEM A305 requirement. 

In this course, students combine knowledge with practical skills in this course by purifying, synthesizing, and identifying organic compounds. Techniques include: organic reactions, recrystallization, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, and melting point. Students also learn how to keep a lab notebook. There are three-hour laboratory periods four days per week.  Lab fee $100.

PSYC A311 Psychology and the Law
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the study of psychology's relevancy to the legal system. Through class discussion and critical thought, students analyze four main dilemmas: 1) The rights of individuals versus the common good, 2) equality versus discretion, 3) discovery of truth versus resolving conflicts, and 4) science versus the law as a source of decisions. Students are required to apply what they learn to their observations of a local trial or through a service-learning experience.

SPAN A311 Survey of Spanish Literature II
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on Spanish literary readings from the 18th century to the present and examines relevant themes, movements and social issues.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SPAN A311 Survey of Spanish Literature II
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on Spanish literary readings from the 18th century to the present and examines relevant themes, movements and social issues.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A311 Writing Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing short fiction. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students read widely and analyze published short stories as well as peer work.

Sophomore, or permission of instructor
POLS A312 International Humanitarian Intervention
3.00 crs.

This course examines one of the policy options of international community to stop or prevent gross human rights violation, humanitarian intervention. First, we understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and the major ethical, legal and political arguments, for and against the military interventions. The second part covers specific instances of the interventions, examining what has happened, who had authority to intervene, how the capacity to stop the violence was mobilized and under what political context the intervention became feasible or not. The third part of the course touches upon a new approach of humanitarian intervention: Responsibility to Protect (R2P). This relatively new concept of intervention is discussed for further speculation of the current debates over the use of force for humanitarian purposes.

ENGL A312 Writing Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing poetry. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students read widely and analyze published poems as well as peer work.

Sophomore, or permission of instructor
CRIM A313 Criminal Evidence
3.00 crs.

Rules of evidence are examined including examination of witnesses, impeachment, and circumstantial evidence. Special emphasis will be given to relevancy, hearsay and its exceptions, privileges, presumptions and inferences, burden of proof, judicial notice, and the parole evidence rule.

ENGL A313 Screenwriting I
3.00 crs.

This course is the first in a two-part sequence on screenwriting. Students learn formatting and elements of screenwriting by adapting a short story into a script for a short film. Each student also develops a story and completes as the final project a treatment for an original feature-length screenplay to be written in ENGL A314. Upon completion of the course, students have a foundation in the craft of screenwriting necessary to complete a feature-length screenplay.

Sophomore, or permission of instructor
CHEM A314 (Advanced) Synthesis & Characterization
2.00 crs.

This advanced laboratory in organic chemistry for chemistry majors allows students to use modern spectroscopic methods in conjunction with synthesis to identify and/or determine the structure of organic compounds.  The overall goal of this lab-based course is to increase students’ skills in modern structure determination using IR-, NMR-, UV-Vis- and  Mass-spectroscopy.  Students also employ column chromatography for purification, and gas chromatography for identification. Lab Fee $100.

Either CHEM A302 or CHEM A305 or CHEM A310
BIOL A314 Anatomy and Physiology I
3.00 crs.

In this course, students learn about the principles of anatomy and physiology, part I: This includes the study of the anatomy of the human body and how different organ systems work both individually and together in humans. The organ systems of focus are the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous organ systems. Also considered is how disruptions in normal function cause disease, and how the human body is (or is not) able to return to homeostasis.

Biology core courses
GREK A314 Greek Tragedy
3.00 crs.

This course examines the tragedy of ancient Athens. Study focuses on the mechanics of the language, the workings of the tragic stage, the historical background of the plays, and the larger issues about society that the plays raise. 

or equivalent
PSYC A314 Health Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the relationship between psychological theory, principles, and methods and the assessment, prevention, maintenance, and restoration of physical health. Doctor-patient relationships and their impact on health are also considered.

and one additional PSYCA***, or permission of instructor
ENGL A314 Screenwriting II
3.00 crs.

This course is the second in a two-part sequence on the craft of feature screenwriting. In the first weeks of the semester, students begin writing a screenplay based on the treatment they wrote and revised in ENGL A313. Each student writes an original feature-length screenplay as the final project, a draft of which is completed by mid-term. These drafts are critiqued in a workshop and revised over the second half of the semester.

Sophomore, or permission of instructor
ENGL A314 Screenwriting II
3.00 crs.

This course is the second in a two-part sequence on the craft of feature screenwriting. In the first weeks of the semester, students begin writing a screenplay based on the treatment they wrote and revised in ENGL A313. Each student writes an original feature-length screenplay as the final project, a draft of which is completed by mid-term. These drafts are critiqued in a workshop and revised over the second half of the semester.

Sophomore, or permission of instructor
FREN A315 Analysis of French Texts
3.00 crs.

This course discusses specific techniques of intensive reading and analysis through an in-depth study of a variety of short texts in French chosen to represent various discourse styles, periods, genres, themes, and traditions from both French and Francophone cultural milieux. Special emphasis is on training students in the commentaire or explication de texte.

or placement
BIOL A315 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A314 and provides students with skills needed to examine both normal and pathological form and function of the human body at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organ system levels. The focus will be on human skeletal, muscle, nervous, heart & circulatory, blood, respiratory, urinary, vision and auditory systems. Lab fee $50.

Biology core courses
PSYC A315 Behavioral Neuroscience
3.00 crs.

This course is an investigation of the biological basis of behavior. The focus is on neural and hormonal regulation and control of behavior.

or concurrent enrollment in PSYC A303
COSC A315 Computer Organization
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the topics of digital logic, digital systems, machine level representation of data, assembly level machine organization, memory system organization, I/O, and communication.

Sophomore
SPAN A315 Culture and Civilization of Spain
3.00 crs.

This course is a historical approach to Spanish civilization.  Students study elements of Spanish culture including the languages, music, arts, architecture, and current socio-political issues.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SPAN A315 Culture and Civilization of Spain
3.00 crs.

This course is a historical approach to Spanish civilization.  Students study elements of Spanish culture including the languages, music, arts, architecture, and current socio-political issues.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SOCI A315 Delinquency and Justice
3.00 crs.

This course examines the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency in American society and the ways in which society and justice system respond to delinquency and prevent.  Topics include theories of causation; research on the causes of delinquency, juvenile justice policy, the components and historical evolution of the juvenile justice system, and the effectiveness of institutional and community-based correction and treatment programs.  In addition, the course takes a historical perspective on trends and changes in societal responses to delinquency.

RELS A315 Gospel of John
3.00 crs.

Using literary, historical, and socio-contextual approaches, this course examines the Gospel of John and the epistles of John with focus on the Johannine themes of glory, salvation, love and service. It also explores the Book of Revelation and its message for ancient and contemporary Christians.

Christianity Major Course

GREK A315 Greek Comedy
3.00 crs.

This course examines both old and new comedy of ancient Athens. Study focuses on the mechanics of the language, the workings of the comic stage, the historic background of the plays, and the larger issues about society that the plays raise.

or equivalent
POLS A315 International Relations
3.00 crs.

This is a comprehensive, systematic study of fundamental principles that govern international politics.

CHEM A315 Introduction to Forensic Methods
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to instrumental and chemical analysis techniques used in forensic investigations. Topics covered may include: serological analysis, fingerprint analysis, soil and glass analysis, hair and fiber analysis, arson/explosive analysis, document analysis, and drug/toxicological analysis. Lab fee $100.

BIOL A316 Anatomy and Physiology II
3.00 crs.

In this course, students learn about the principles of anatomy and physiology, part II: This includes the study of the anatomy of the human body and how different organ systems work both individually and together in humans. The organ systems of focus are endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive organ systems. Also considered is how disruptions in normal function cause disease, and how the human body is (or is not) able to return to homeostasis.

Biology core courses
PSYC A316 Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences which approximately parallel the course content of PSYC A315. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A315.  Lab fee $50.

ENGL A316 Medieval Literature
3.00 crs.

This courses offers a broad introduction to texts written in the British Isles between the beginning of the eighth century and the end of the fifteenth. Students study a wide array of medieval literary genres and their conventions. Further reading and discussion are devoted to the literary, historical, political, cultural, artistic, philosophical, and theological contexts for the various modes of written expression studied in the course.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A316 Medieval Literature
3.00 crs.

This courses offers a broad introduction to texts written in the British Isles between the beginning of the eighth century and the end of the fifteenth. Students study a wide array of medieval literary genres and their conventions. Further reading and discussion are devoted to the literary, historical, political, cultural, artistic, philosophical, and theological contexts for the various modes of written expression studied in the course.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
BIOL A317 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A316 and provides students with skills needed to examine normal form and function of the domestic cat body at the tissue, organ, and organ system levels. The focus will be on cat muscle, digestive, heart & circulatory, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lab fee $50.

Biology core courses
COSC A317 Data Structures
3.00 crs.

This course covers the basics of data structures, such as abstract data types, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Applications to a number of problems, both practical and theoretical, are studied,  including sorting, searching, and changing from recursion to iteration.

Sophomore
HIST A317 History of Genocide
3.00 crs.

This course examines the nature of genocide concentrating on episodes of genocide in the twentieth and twenty-first century, and investigating distant and proximate roots of specific episodes in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.  The consequences of specific acts of genocide, responses to genocide and strategies for combating genocide are also considered.

POLS A317 Politics and Dictators
3.00 crs.

Despite the global spread of democracy and democratic ideals in the last forty years, authoritarianism is the longest lasting and common form of governance around the world. For much of history, most people have lived under some form of dictatorship and currently 40 percent of the world's population still does. The course will focus on the politics of authoritarian regimes and the personal characteristics of their leaders. 

ENGL A317 Writing the Short Script
3.00 crs.

Writing the Short Script focuses on monologues, dialogues and short scripts. Designed to strengthen the dialogue and blocking skills of students interested in writing fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and stage plays, the course combines readings of modern and contemporary literature with workshop discussions and individual conferences with the instructor about writing assignments.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A317 Writing the Short Script
3.00 crs.

Writing the Short Script focuses on monologues, dialogues and short scripts. Designed to strengthen the dialogue and blocking skills of students interested in writing fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and stage plays, the course combines readings of modern and contemporary literature with workshop discussions and individual conferences with the instructor about writing assignments.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A318 Psychology of Sexuality
3.00 crs.

A survey of human sexuality from a psychological perspective: Focusing primarily on psychological theory and research, students gain an understanding of how the psychology of sexuality is impacted by biological, sociological, philosophical, spiritual, and legal perspectives. Students also develop a greater awareness of the role of sexuality in their lives and the lives of others. Topics include sexual development, sexual behaviors, sexual disorders, sex therapy, gender & transgender issues, as well as fetishes and paraphilias.

and one additional PSYCA***
PSYC A318 Psychology of Sexuality
3.00 crs.

A survey of human sexuality from a psychological perspective: Focusing primarily on psychological theory and research, students gain an understanding of how the psychology of sexuality is impacted by biological, sociological, philosophical, spiritual, and legal perspectives. Students also develop a greater awareness of the role of sexuality in their lives and the lives of others. Topics include sexual development, sexual behaviors, sexual disorders, sex therapy, gender & transgender issues, as well as fetishes and paraphilias.

and one additional PSYCA***
COSC A319 Internet Technologies
3.00 crs.

This course explores the concepts and technologies that are used in modern Internet systems, and provides the necessary skills and knowledge of software technologies needed for creating Internet/Web services. It is designed to expose students to web content presentation and generation technologies, programming, and building multi-tiered client/server web applications.

Sophomore
FREN A320 Culture and Civilization I
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to French civilization from Lascaux and Gallo-Roman times to the 18th century. It includes the study of the geography of the French hexagon, from the centrality of Paris to the regionalism of the provinces. Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque art and music are discussed.

or placement
BIOL A320 Entomology
3.00 crs.

This course explores the diversity of insects, their structural adaptations, evolution, classification, life histories and habits, and their economic importance. An extensive insect collection is the focus of the experiential learning process with an emphasis on the natural history of the group. 

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
MATH A320 Linear Algebra
3.00 crs.

In Linear Algebra expands on topics introduced in MATH A200 such as vector spaces, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, linear functionals, bilinear forms, vector geometry, and their applications.

PHIL A320 Social and Political Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is an inquiry into the origin, nature, and necessity of political order. The relation of the individual to the social and political whole, the origin, nature, and just use of political authority, the nature of rights and duty, the problem of freedom, and the philosophical prerequisites of a just social order are addressed.

SOCI A320 Sociology of Religion
3.00 crs.

Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx and Max Weber, the founding fathers of modern sociology, each devoted some time to writing about religion and society. This course focuses on questions such as: What do people believe? How do people talk about religion? How is religion organized? How does religious belief impact other aspects of social life? Although these questions can be asked of all societies, the primary focus of this class is the contemporary United States.

RELS A320 The Christian God
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the problem of belief as it evolved from the enlightenment period to the present. It also examines the bearing of the secularization process on God-talk and traditional approaches to God, and investigates recent efforts by process thinkers to reconstruct the idea of God with implications for Christian theologies and life.

Christianity Major Course

CRIM A320 Violent Offenders
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the violent offender in which physical injury is inflicted against one or more others, including, but not limited to criminal homicide, aggravated assault, forcible rape, armed robbery, or attempts to inflict other physical injuries. Typologies of violent offenders are reviewed examining such factors as motives, facilitation and situational aspects of the crime, selection of victims, criminal careers, and group support for violent behavior.  Special types of violent offenders such as mass murderers, serial murderers, child murderers, and domestic murderers are also covered.

SOCI A321 Body, Society and Health
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to some of the intellectual debates of the social body and body-related processes in the field of sociology. Particularly, this course focuses on the role varied social institutions play in defining and shaping our bodily experiences and overall health and well-being. Some of the substantive topics covered in this class are bodily practices of dieting, cosmetic surgery, sex-reassignment surgery, and health-conditions related to cancer, AIDS, obesity, and eating disorders.

FREN A321 Culture and Civilization II
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the important historical, social and economic events beginning with the Revolution of 1789 to  the present. The nature and development of French aesthetics and artistic traditions in painting, sculpture, and music will be presented, along with current topics including education, and the politics of modern-day France.

or placement
BIOL A321 Entomology Lab
1.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets in conjunction with BIOL A320.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
CHEM A322 Analytical Chemistry Lab
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced laboratory with one hour of recitation each week for all chemistry majors. The lecture and experiments may cover a wide range of techniques and topics including chemical literature, inorganic synthesis and characterization, photochemistry, titrations, kinetics, extractions, UV-Vis, and chromatography. This laboratory is project-based and requires students to plan and execute experiments involving concepts and techniques from several subdisciplines.  Lab fee $100.

or permission of instructor
GREK A322 New Testament Greek
3.00 crs.

Students taking this course read and discuss at least two books from the New Testament. In addition, they compare a variety of modern translations to the original text.

or equivalent
SOCI A323 Social Justice in New Orleans
3.00 crs.

In this course, students combine sociology coursework with an intensive community placement in a social justice organization in New Orleans. Students spend approximately 6-8 hours per week (at least 80 hours over the course of the semester) at their community service sites. Work in the community is supplemented by the sociological exploration of social justice in general and specifically as it pertains to the individual service sites.

ENGL A324 Early Shakespeare
3.00 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic and poetic works from Shakespeare's literary “apprenticeship” of the early 1590s to 1600. Situating Shakespeare’s works in their dynamic historical context—including the Protestant Reformation, the age of exploration, the rise of capitalism, the urban landscape of London, and the popular new public theatres—we study how these plays and poems spoke to Renaissance auditors and how they pose timeless questions for new audiences.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A324 Early Shakespeare
3.00 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic and poetic works from Shakespeare's literary “apprenticeship” of the early 1590s to 1600. Situating Shakespeare’s works in their dynamic historical context—including the Protestant Reformation, the age of exploration, the rise of capitalism, the urban landscape of London, and the popular new public theatres—we study how these plays and poems spoke to Renaissance auditors and how they pose timeless questions for new audiences.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
FREN A325 La Nouvelle-Orleans
3.00 crs.

This course examines the French heritage of New Orleans, and explores the French side of our history, institutions, architecture, language, food, and celebrations. The assignments and discussions help students know and appreciate the cultural uniqueness and rich heritage of the city in which they live and study.

or placement
ENGL A325 Late Shakespeare
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on Shakespeare's works after 1600. Established by this time as a successful playwright and poet, Shakespeare takes greater risks with language, form, and themes in this second half of his career. Tracking these innovations through his late comedies and the genres of tragedy and romance that he preferred during this time, we attend to Shakespeare's work in its broader cultural and artistic context.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A325 Late Shakespeare
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on Shakespeare's works after 1600. Established by this time as a successful playwright and poet, Shakespeare takes greater risks with language, form, and themes in this second half of his career. Tracking these innovations through his late comedies and the genres of tragedy and romance that he preferred during this time, we attend to Shakespeare's work in its broader cultural and artistic context.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CRIM A325 Sex Offenses and Offenders
3.00 crs.

This course is a comprehensive overview of psychological, sociological and legal issues related to sex offenses. Additionally, the sexual offenses and different typologies of the sex offenders are discussed.

PSYC A326 Environmental Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of environmental psychology. Areas of focus include ambient environmental variables, environmental stressors, density and crowding, architecture and behavior, and pro-environmental behaviors. Living, learning, working, and recreational environments are considered, as are institutional environments.

and one additional PSYCA***
BIOL A326 Molecular Genetics
3.00 crs.

Fundamentals of molecular genetics such as transcription, DNA synthesis and repair, and RNA processing are discussed. Through review and discussion of scientific literature and laboratory experience, students learn the process of scientific investigation, recent findings and new technologies in the field of molecular genetics.

Biology core courses
HIST A327 Hitler and Nazi Germany
3.00 crs.

This course traces the development of Hitler through his rise to power to his subordination of Germany to his dictatorship.  It examines the character of the Nazi state, its monopolization of power through terror, its racial agenda, its aggressive ethnic imperialism, and its ultimate defeat as a result of hubristic over-extension.

BIOL A327 Molecular Genetics Lab
1.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A326.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
PSYC A327 Psychology of Women and Gender
3.00 crs.

This course investigates the life span development of women. The predominant focus concerns the ways in which class, gender, race, and cultural background affect the individual. Also addressed are issues and factors related to societal stereotypes of women.

and one additional PSYCA***
BIOL A328 Genetic Analysis
3.00 crs.

This course addresses advanced topics in transmission genetics, cytogenetics, evolutionary genetics and mutagenesis. Emphasis is placed on development of quantitative skills and written and oral communication.

Biology core courses
CRIM A330 Correctional Institutions
3.00 crs.

The course examines the theory and practice of correctional institutions and functions; the history of the prison as a total institution; types of correctional facilities; problems of rehabilitation in correctional institutions; crimes in prisons; adjusting to prison life; the inmate culture; and the future of correctional institutions.  The course includes tours of local and state correctional institutions.

BIOL A330 Ecology
3.00 crs.

This course examines basic ecological principles and concepts including the nature of the ecosystem, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and the ecology of populations and communities.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
FREN A330 Introduction to French Literature I
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major literary currents and principal authors from the Middle Ages through the 17th century.

or placement
ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the modern European novel. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction.)

Sophomore
ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the modern European novel. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction.)

Sophomore
PHIL A330 Modern Political Thought
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to modern political theory through explication and critique of readings from classics of modern political thought. Readings are selected from works by major theorists such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Burke, Bentham, de Tocqueville, Hegel, Marx and Mill.

SPAN A330 Spanish Across Disciplines
3.00 crs.

This is a variable-topic class that stresses vocabulary, writing, and oral skills in Spanish pertaining to specific disciplines, such as Social Work or Journalism, and other professions. Through reading texts, discussions in class, and writing, students practice the vocabulary and approaches for the profession(s) and learn about cultural specifics.

or permission of instructor
BIOL A331 Ecology Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory meets four to five hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A330 and provides students with skills needed to quantify ecological interactions of plants and animals.  This course requires student participation in multiple field trips.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
ENGL A331 Introduction to African-American Literature
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of African-American literature from the late 18th-century through Reconstruction to 1900.  The course examines various types of African-American literary and cultural productions, including folk narratives, autobiographies, slave narratives, essays, speeches, poetry, and short fiction, as well as the historical, cultural, socio-political and literary contexts in which they were produced.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A331 Introduction to African-American Literature
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of African-American literature from the late 18th-century through Reconstruction to 1900.  The course examines various types of African-American literary and cultural productions, including folk narratives, autobiographies, slave narratives, essays, speeches, poetry, and short fiction, as well as the historical, cultural, socio-political and literary contexts in which they were produced.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
FREN A331 Introduction to French Literature II
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major literary currents and principal authors of the 19th and 20th centuries.

or equivalent
CRIM A331 Probation and Parole
3.00 crs.

This class focuses on probation and parole, which is part of the criminal justice system. Topics include:   the history of probation and the courts, sentencing and the presentence investigation, community-based corrections, indeterminate sentences and punishment, rehabilitation, theory and practice, and probation and parole in the twenty-first century.

CHEM A332 Advanced Integrated Chemistry Laboratory
2.00 crs.

This course is an advanced chemistry laboratory that may involve synthesis, structural analysis, thermodynamics, chemical separations, electrochemistry, advanced kinetics, or spectroscopy. Lab fee $100.

ENGL A332 African-American Literature Since 1900
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of African-American literature after 1900, providing an historical and cultural study of the foundational writers, themes, and genres of African-American literary production of the era. The course provides a conceptual framework for this literature, evaluates key terms, ideas, literary periods, constructions and representations of African-American identity and race, and the contributions of African-American writers to American literature and culture.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A332 African-American Literature Since 1900
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of African-American literature after 1900, providing an historical and cultural study of the foundational writers, themes, and genres of African-American literary production of the era. The course provides a conceptual framework for this literature, evaluates key terms, ideas, literary periods, constructions and representations of African-American identity and race, and the contributions of African-American writers to American literature and culture.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A333 Narrative Across Media
3.00 crs.

This course tracks narrative across multiple media forms. It prepares students to analyze and compare the ways narrative gets implemented by different media, as well as chart stories that extend beyond individual media objects. In the process, they will consider narrative's media-specificity even as it seems to transcend media.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A333 Narrative Across Media
3.00 crs.

This course tracks narrative across multiple media forms. It prepares students to analyze and compare the ways narrative gets implemented by different media, as well as chart stories that extend beyond individual media objects. In the process, they will consider narrative's media-specificity even as it seems to transcend media.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
BIOL A334 Biology of Fishes
3.00 crs.

This course examines phylogenetic relationships, functional morphology, physiology, sensory biology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, biogeography, and conservation of fishes.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
BIOL A335 Biology of Fishes Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A334 and provides students with skills needed to understand phylogeny, form, function and natural history of fishes.  This course requires student participation in multiple fieldtrips.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
POLS A335 Politics of Northern Ireland
3.00 crs.

This online course will focus on the politics of Northern Ireland. We will analyze how events such as the Easter Rising of 1916, the Anglo-Irish War, and the 1920 Partition shaped the formation of the Northern Irish state. This course will also examine Northern Irish politics from 1921-1968 and how nationalist grievances and unionist reactions would lead to the 30-year conflict known as the Troubles.

LAS A335 Postcolonial Literatures
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of postcolonial literatures from Africa, India, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Postcolonial literature largely emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, after people across the global South gained political independence from Western colonizers.  Readings focus on both the counter-narratives of history, memory, and identity that were central literary concerns after independence and more recent literary trends that explore globalization, cosmopolitanism, multilingualism, and migration.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
LAS A335 Postcolonial Literatures
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of postcolonial literatures from Africa, India, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Postcolonial literature largely emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, after people across the global South gained political independence from Western colonizers.  Readings focus on both the counter-narratives of history, memory, and identity that were central literary concerns after independence and more recent literary trends that explore globalization, cosmopolitanism, multilingualism, and migration.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A335 Postcolonial Literatures
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of postcolonial literatures from Africa, India, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Postcolonial literature largely emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, after people across the global South gained political independence from Western colonizers.  Readings focus on both the counter-narratives of history, memory, and identity that were central literary concerns after independence and more recent literary trends that explore globalization, cosmopolitanism, multilingualism, and migration.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A335 Postcolonial Literatures
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of postcolonial literatures from Africa, India, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Postcolonial literature largely emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, after people across the global South gained political independence from Western colonizers.  Readings focus on both the counter-narratives of history, memory, and identity that were central literary concerns after independence and more recent literary trends that explore globalization, cosmopolitanism, multilingualism, and migration.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SOCI A335 Research Methods and Techniques
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the basic methodological toolkit of sociological analysis including: survey design, analysis of secondary data, interviewing, focus groups, participant observation, and content analysis. The course establishes best practices for the development of research projects in sociology including the development of a feasible research question and the choosing of an appropriate methodology for answering the question of interest. Students also develop the skills necessary to critique the methodologies of existing academic literature in sociology.

CRIM A335 Security and Crime Prevention
3.00 crs.

The course addresses the field of private security and crime prevention in such diverse environments as manufacturing, commerce, finance, healthcare, and government.  Private security missions include protection of persons, places, and things; loss prevention; private investigation; security assessment; and those services not provided by the public sector.  Issues such as education, training, industry-specific security guidelines, and advances in security technology are also addressed.

BIOL A336 Animal Behavior
3.00 crs.

This course examines behavioral adaptations of animals and critically evaluates hypotheses to account for the evolution of these adaptations. Student activities emphasize field observation of animal behavior, experimental design, and scientific communication.

Biology core courses
LATN A336 Augustan Prose
3.00 crs.

In this course, students read the works of authors who lived during the Age of Augustus (31 B.C. to 14 A.D.) including Augustus, Livy, and/or Vitruvius. Assignments focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these authors to the times in which they lived.

or equivalent
LAS A336 Indigenous Literatures of the Americas in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course examines the literary and cinematic works of indigenous authors across the Americas. In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of indigenous peoples in the Americas. The study of this literature adds nuance to the anthropological, sociological and historical “facts” to these different groups and their literatures. A focus on translation theory as the point of departure allows students a critical approach to these texts. This course is cross-listed with ENGL-A336: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A336 Indigenous Literatures of the Americas in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course examines the literary and cinematic works of indigenous authors across the Americas. In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of indigenous peoples in the Americas. The study of this literature adds nuance to the anthropological, sociological and historical “facts” to these different groups and their literatures. A focus on translation theory as the point of departure allows students a critical approach to these texts. This course is cross-listed with LAS-A336: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
LAS A336 Indigenous Literatures of the Americas in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course examines the literary and cinematic works of indigenous authors across the Americas. In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of indigenous peoples in the Americas. The study of this literature adds nuance to the anthropological, sociological and historical “facts” to these different groups and their literatures. A focus on translation theory as the point of departure allows students a critical approach to these texts. This course is cross-listed with ENGL-A336: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A336 Indigenous Literatures of the Americas in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course examines the literary and cinematic works of indigenous authors across the Americas. In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of indigenous peoples in the Americas. The study of this literature adds nuance to the anthropological, sociological and historical “facts” to these different groups and their literatures. A focus on translation theory as the point of departure allows students a critical approach to these texts. This course is cross-listed with LAS-A336: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SOCI A336 Social Statistics
3.00 crs.

This course is a general introduction to the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistical procedures for data analysis in the social and behavioral sciences. The course begins with basic univariate and bivariate statistical techniques and progresses to multivariate analyses ending with a basic understanding of linear regression.  Students completing this course are expected to apply them by analyzing of data and interpreting the results. Students demonstrate their mastery and application of these procedures during a weekly lab period.

Corequisites:
SOCI A336 Social Statistics
3.00 crs.

This course is a general introduction to the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistical procedures for data analysis in the social and behavioral sciences. The course begins with basic univariate and bivariate statistical techniques and progresses to multivariate analyses ending with a basic understanding of linear regression.  Students completing this course are expected to apply them by analyzing of data and interpreting the results. Students demonstrate their mastery and application of these procedures during a weekly lab period.

Corequisites:
LATN A337 Augustan Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course examines the works of poets who lived during the Age of Augustus (31 B.C. to 14 A.D.) including Vergil, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, and/or Ovid. Assignments focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these poets to the times in which they lived.

or equivalent
BIOL A338 Plant Ecology
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the quantitative study of plants and their environment.  Emphasis is placed on understanding the functional ecology of individual plants and vegetation in terrestrial ecosystems.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
POLS A338 Politics and Ethics of International Human Rights
3.00 crs.

The course covers main legal, philosophical, and theoretical debates on the definition and practice of international human rights. It also delves into several significant cases of human rights violations and human rights practices. Several controversial themes such as Asian Value, American Exceptionalism or Humanitarian Intervention are to be discussed.

SOCI A338 Research Methods and Techniques Lab
1.00 crs.

This course offers an opportunity to practice research methods introduced in SOCI A335 Research Methods and Techniques. Students are asked to design surveys, create interview protocols, and write field notes. The lab also introduces software for the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, such as Atlas.ti and SPSS.

BIOL A339 Plant Ecology Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory course accompanying BIOL A338 and exposes students to modern field and laboratory techniques in plant physiological ecology.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
SOCI A339 Social Statistics Lab
1.00 crs.

The statistics lab is a corequisite of SOCI A336 Social Statistics and is used to apply the statistical methods used in class by using Statistical Package for the Social Statistics (SPSS).  The lab acquaints students with how to use SPSS, which is a commonly used quantitative computer program.  The lab meets once a week.  Weekly assignments correspond to the analytical techniques covered in class.  An emphasis is placed on interpreting the statistical results.

Corequisites:
PHIL A340 Being and God
3.00 crs.

RAC: Catholic Tradition; Premodern

This course exams of the nature of being and the existence of God from the standpoint of classical metaphysics. It studies topics such as the structure of finite being, the transcendentals, analogy and univocity of being, metaphysical causality and the problem of creation.

ENGL A340 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
3.00 crs.

This course explores the variety and complexity of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Students approach the Tales as an anthology of literary forms current in fourteenth-century England and consider Chaucer’s genius in subverting the conventions of these forms. Students analyze selected tales from a variety of critical positions while also attending to the influence of 14th-century politics, religion, science, and art on the development of Chaucer’s poetry.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A340 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
3.00 crs.

This course explores the variety and complexity of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Students approach the Tales as an anthology of literary forms current in fourteenth-century England and consider Chaucer’s genius in subverting the conventions of these forms. Students analyze selected tales from a variety of critical positions while also attending to the influence of 14th-century politics, religion, science, and art on the development of Chaucer’s poetry.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHYS A340 Classical Mechanics
4.00 crs.

This is a junior-level course that introduces methods of classical mechanics. It gives a rigorous treatment of Newtonian and Lagrangian formulations of classical mechanics, including numerous applications. It is a continuation and extension of the course (Introduction to Mechanics PHYS A101).

PHYS A340 Classical Mechanics
4.00 crs.

This is a junior-level course that introduces methods of classical mechanics. It gives a rigorous treatment of Newtonian and Lagrangian formulations of classical mechanics, including numerous applications. It is a continuation and extension of the course (Introduction to Mechanics PHYS A101).

CRIM A340 Environmental Criminology
3.00 crs.

This course examines criminological solutions to environmental problems. Issues addressed include the nature of environmental offenders and victims, the political landscape of environmental law, the variety of approaches to achieving environmental justice, crimes against animals, the development of environmental radical groups, and criminal justice solutions to specific environmental problems.

MATH A340 Math Probability
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the theory of probability. Topics include combinatorial analysis, axioms of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, multivariate probability distributions, function of random variables, and basic limit theorems.

SPAN A340 Spanish-American Literature I
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of Latin-American literature from the Discovery to the Romantic movement.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SPAN A340 Spanish-American Literature I
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of Latin-American literature from the Discovery to the Romantic movement.

or permission of instructor, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A341 Ethical Hacking - Penetration Testing
3.00 crs.

This course is a hands-on lab in “ethical hacking” and other forms of penetration testing for the purpose of finding and resolving vulnerabilities in computer systems and networks.  The course is founded on absorbing the Mitre ATT&CK framework as a means of understanding adversarial behavior.  Students perform penetration tests on specially configured target systems, which may include externally-managed cyber-ranges. Students also participate in bug bounties, and learn how to articulate and practice responsible disclosure of cybersecurity vulnerabilities.  Upon completion, students will be prepared for the Certified Ethical Hacker qualification test.

BIOL A341 Plant Science
3.00 crs.

An introduction to applied botany emphasizing the biology and utilization of cultivated plants. The lecture
will examine the structure and function of plants and explore the relationships between plants, people,
agriculture, and the environment. The laboratory will emphasize economic botany and introduce students to
basic horticultural techniques in the context of independent research projects.

SPAN A341 Spanish-American Literature II
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of Latin-American literature from the latter part of the 19th century to the present, including realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
MATH A341 Statistics Theory and Methods
3.00 crs.

This course shows how statistics makes inferences about a population based on information from samples. Topics include estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models, and estimation by least squares. Experimental design, analysis of variance, analysis of enumerative data, and nonparametric statistics.

Permission of instructor
COSC A342 Digital Forensics
3.00 crs.

The increasing dependence in everyday life on computer information systems has led to a corresponding increase in criminal activity through and against such systems. In addition, benign use of information systems has grown to the extent that such systems are now routinely part of discovery in civil and criminal legal proceedings. In this course, students will learn the techniques of digital forensics that are used to investigate cybersecurity incidents, legal disputes, and crimes. We will develop approaches that can be used on desktop personal computers and servers. The course will also emphasize the importance of controls and verification of digital evidence and the critical necessity of preserving and documenting a chain of custody for that evidence.

BIOL A342 Plant Science Lab
1.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A341.  Lab fee $100.

Corequisites:
LATN A342 Prose of Imperial Rome
3.00 crs.

This course examines the prose works of the early imperial period. Study of these works provides in-depth information about Roman life and politics in the first and second century A.D. and demonstrates the range of expression capable in Latin. 

or equivalent
TEAC A343 Classroom Management and Organization
3.00 crs.

This course explores the dynamic relationship between assessment and instruction in the construction of an engaged learning community.  Field experiences are included.

LATN A343 Poetry of Imperial Rome
3.00 crs.

This course surveys the works of poets who lived during the Roman Empire, specifically from the reign of Nero to the reign of Trajan. Genres include epic, bucolics, and satire. Assignments focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these poets to the times in which they lived. 

or equivalent
POLS A344 Scope and Methods in Political Science
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the methods of political analysis and criticism, the course analyzes political language, the media, the foundations of political argument, the science of politics, and the methodology of social science.

Either POLS A200, POLS A201, or POLS A315 is acceptable, or permission of instructor
POLS A344 Scope and Methods in Political Science
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the methods of political analysis and criticism, the course analyzes political language, the media, the foundations of political argument, the science of politics, and the methodology of social science.

Either POLS A200, POLS A201, or POLS A315 is acceptable, or permission of instructor
POLS A344 Scope and Methods in Political Science
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the methods of political analysis and criticism, the course analyzes political language, the media, the foundations of political argument, the science of politics, and the methodology of social science.

Either POLS A200, POLS A201, or POLS A315 is acceptable, or permission of instructor
POLS A344 Scope and Methods in Political Science
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the methods of political analysis and criticism, the course analyzes political language, the media, the foundations of political argument, the science of politics, and the methodology of social science.

Either POLS A200, POLS A201, or POLS A315 is acceptable, or permission of instructor
BIOL A345 Herpetology
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the study of morphology, adaptation, classification, distribution, and ecology of amphibians and reptiles. Students participate in field work and identification of North American groups and field studies of local fauna. 

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
PSYC A345 Psychology of Testing and Measurement
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the principles and practice of basic psychological testing, theory of measurement, test construction, and reliability/validity of test instruments. Emphasis is on tests of intelligence, aptitude, interests, organic brain dysfunction, and personality functions.

CRIM A345 Seminar Constitutional Law
3.00 crs.

The course reviews basic constitutional law and in-depth analysis of Supreme Court decisions decided during recent terms of court with a special emphasis on trends in constitutional law and criminal procedure.

SOCI A345 Sociological Theory
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the original writings of a number of contemporary social theorists since the classical works of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Simmel. Students examine the conceptual tools and theoretical propositions advanced in the major paradigms of modern sociological thought. After considering the nature and role of theory in social science and briefly examining the classical foundations of contemporary sociological theory, students begin a rigorous analysis of the substance and structure of each major school of thought including motivational theory, phenomenology and symbolic interactionism, functionalism and systems theory, neo-Darwinian theory, sociobiology, rational-choice and exchange theories, conflict theory, feminist theory, constraint theory, and behavioral theory. In addition, students devote some time to various theories of modernity and postmodernity. Students end the course with an interactive theory debate on a specific substantive area of social life.

MATH A345 Topics in Geometry
3.00 crs.

The course includes foundations of geometry, congruences, parallelism, similarities, measures, coordinate systems, axiom systems for the Euclidean, and projective planes.

Prerequisite
BIOL A346 Herpetology Lab
1.00 crs.

Field and laboratory experience that meets six hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A345.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
POLS A346 Polling and Voting Behavior
3.00 crs.

This course is an examination of the psychological, cultural, and social bases of political behavior, including the study of attitude formation, group affiliation, collective behavior, and the role of values in political behavior.

ENGL A346 Renaissance Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course surveys English lyric poetry of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by poets such as Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Whitney, Donne, Herbert, and Wroth. We consider how poets imagine, structure, and transform their craft at this time of both classical revival and extraordinary innovation.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A346 Renaissance Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course surveys English lyric poetry of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by poets such as Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Whitney, Donne, Herbert, and Wroth. We consider how poets imagine, structure, and transform their craft at this time of both classical revival and extraordinary innovation.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A346 Test and Measurements Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves supervised laboratory experience in administration, scoring, and interpretation of psychological tests. It is an obligatory lab to accompany PSYC A345. Lab fee $50.

BIOL A347 Parasitology
3.00 crs.

This course emphasizes parasites of public health concern, and includes review of recent studies using current technologies. Major conceptual themes also include: Evolutionary relationships, virulence, origins of a parasitic life, life histories, manipulation of hosts, host immune responses, and consequences for host. 

Biology core courses
POLS A347 Political Economy
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the study of political economy and focuses on the development of the discipline from the 18th century to the present and engages the student in the debates surrounding some of the most important texts in political economy. The student will read Locke, Smith, Marx, and others who have influenced political-economic arguments in the West since 1650.

PSYC A347 Psychology of Sport and Exercise
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to theory, research, and applied in the field of sport and exercise psychology. The focus is on psychological factors that affect participation, involvement, and performance in sport and exercise.

ENGL A348 Modern Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course surveys the major figures in England and America from Whitman to the beginning of World War II, such as Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Auden.

Prerequisite
Sophomore
ENGL A349 Twentieth-century American Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course examines American novels and short stories from 1900 to the turn of the twenty-first century, exploring such movements as realism, naturalism, regionalism, modernism, ethnic writing, and postmodernism.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A349 Twentieth-century American Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course examines American novels and short stories from 1900 to the turn of the twenty-first century, exploring such movements as realism, naturalism, regionalism, modernism, ethnic writing, and postmodernism.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
RELS A350 Christology
3.00 crs.

This course includes a look at New Testament Christology, a brief study of the pre-Nicene views of Christ, the rise of counter-positions, and the official response in the Councils of Nicea, Constantinople I, Ephesus, and Chalcedon, as well as  contemporary critiques of the classical model and recent revisions.

Christianity Major Course

SPAN A350 Culture of Spanish America to 1850
3.00 crs.

This course offers a study of the different cultural traditions that have shaped Latin America from the pre-Colombian period to 1850.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
MATH A350 Differential Equations
3.00 crs.

This course reviews and continues the introduction to ordinary differential equations covered in MATH A310. Selected topics in partial differential equations and include applications to various fields.

MATH A350 Differential Equations
3.00 crs.

This course reviews and continues the introduction to ordinary differential equations covered in MATH A310. Selected topics in partial differential equations and include applications to various fields.

PHYS A350 Electromagnetism
4.00 crs.

This course gives a rigorous treatment of laws of electromagnetism. It covers applications of Maxwell’s equations, including electromagnetic waves. It is a continuation and extension of the course (Introduction to Electromagnetism and Relativity PHYS A102).

PHYS A350 Electromagnetism
4.00 crs.

This course gives a rigorous treatment of laws of electromagnetism. It covers applications of Maxwell’s equations, including electromagnetic waves. It is a continuation and extension of the course (Introduction to Electromagnetism and Relativity PHYS A102).

PSYC A350 Industrial / Organizational Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course involves applications of psychological principles to human problems in organizations, individual needs, and motives as they affect group achievement.

and one additional PSYCA***
CHEM A350 Inorganic I Chemistry
3.00 crs.

This lecture course introduces students to various topics in inorganic chemistry. The topics covered include atomic structure, symmetry and group theory, introduction to ionic and covalent bonding models in coordination complexes, acid-base theories, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.

or permission of instructor
ENGL A350 New Orleans in Literature
3.00 crs.

This course examines the relationship between literature and place focusing on literary representations of New Orleans from the 1830s to the present. Readings include drama, poetry, and prose by natives and non-natives whose work both represents and constructs the mystique of the city.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A350 New Orleans in Literature
3.00 crs.

This course examines the relationship between literature and place focusing on literary representations of New Orleans from the 1830s to the present. Readings include drama, poetry, and prose by natives and non-natives whose work both represents and constructs the mystique of the city.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CRIM A350 Offenders With Mental Illness
3.00 crs.

This course examines deinstitutionalization, the effects of this process on people with mental illness, the ways the criminal justice system has met the challenge of offenders with mental illness, and the efficacy of programs and policies meant to reverse the trend of criminalization.

SPAN A351 Culture of Spanish America from 1850
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of SPAN A350 and focuses on the cultural heritage that has shaped the newly formed nations of Latin America from 1850  to the present.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
FREN A351 Enlightenment and Pre-Romanticism
3.00 crs.

Major trends and ideas in 18th-century literature are examined. Emphasis is on the works of the philosophies and on the development of the novel.

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
ENGL A351 Louisiana Literature
3.00 crs.

This course explores the writers and literary traditions of Louisiana in the context of local, regional, and national concerns.  Readings include works of fiction, drama, and poetry from the colonial period to the present.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A351 Louisiana Literature
3.00 crs.

This course explores the writers and literary traditions of Louisiana in the context of local, regional, and national concerns.  Readings include works of fiction, drama, and poetry from the colonial period to the present.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
FREN A352 19th-century Prose
3.00 crs.

This course involves readings in French theory and in the novels of Balzac, Flaubert, Sand, Stendhal, and Zola. 

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
SOCI A352 Global Race/Ethnic Relations
3.00 crs.

This course explores the historical creation of race through colonialism and its perpetuation in the modern era of globalization, analyzes significant global racial/ethnic conflicts of the modern world such as those in Rwanda, the Middle East, South Africa, and Darfur, and the role of race in global migration. Additionally, this course focuses on the ways race manifests itself in various locations across the globe. Finally, attention is paid to resolving racial/ethnic conflicts.

ENGL A352 Literature and Environment
3.00 crs.

This course explores shifting definitions and concepts of nature, environment, and ecology in a range of literary texts across different time periods, forms, and modes of aesthetic experimentation.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A352 Literature and Environment
3.00 crs.

This course explores shifting definitions and concepts of nature, environment, and ecology in a range of literary texts across different time periods, forms, and modes of aesthetic experimentation.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
FREN A353 20th-century Prose
3.00 crs.

This course involves readings in French theory and in the works of Bernanos, Butor, Camus, Gide, Malraux, Proust, and Sartre. 

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
RELS A354 Dynamics of Salvation
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the history and contemporary status of theories of redemption.

Christianity Major Course

FREN A354 Introduction to French Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course centers on the reading and analysis of poems reflecting the major currents in French poetry from Lamartine, Baudelaire, and Mallarmé to the more recent works of Perse and Ponge.

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
BIOL A355 Conservation Biology
3.00 crs.

The study of the conservation of biodiversity based in the principles of ecology, evolution, and genetics. The primary goal of this course is to understand natural ecological systems in the context of a human dominated world to learn to best maintain biological diversity in concert with an exploding human population. This is accomplished through lecture, socratic discussion, and videos.

Biology core courses
SOCI A355 Environmental Sociology
3.00 crs.

Environmental Sociology is concerned with the scientific study of the interactions between human society and the natural environment, as well as how social systems and ecosystems impact each other. All environmental problems, by their causes and consequences, are inherently social problems, with deeper roots in the dominant economic and political structures, cultural values, resource use patterns, technologies, and systems of inequality. Through the readings, films, lectures, and discussions, students learn to think critically and theoretically about environmental issues, problems, and controversies, as well as how to evaluate different claims about the environment with credible scientific evidence. Emphasis is also placed on developing a system of values and a sense of responsibility that will allow students to contribute to the future sustainability of the planet.

FREN A355 Introduction to French Theatre
3.00 crs.

This course is a chronological view of the development of French drama from its origins to the 20th century offering students an intensive study of representative dramatists and elements of the theatre.

or equivalent
CRIM A355 Police Behavior
3.00 crs.

This course concerns history of the police; changing roles and public expectation of police officers; stress and the police; family life; and social behavior, police crime and deviance ; multi-cultural competency; and evidence based practices. 

BIOL A356 Aquatic Microbiology
3.00 crs.

An introduction to the study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes as well as viruses in the aquatic environment. The course emphasizes the functional role of microbes in aquatic habitats, the relationship of microbial biodiversity to environmental gradients and the interaction of aquatic microbes with human affairs.

Biology core courses
BIOL A357 Aquatic Microbiology Lab
1.00 crs.

Field and laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A356. Students are exposed to modern field and laboratory techniques used with prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes from aquatic habitats. Field trips emphasize local freshwater and estuarine environments.  Lab fee $100.

 

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
RELS A358 Ecumenical Theology
3.00 crs.

This course begins with a review of the origins of Christian division and the motives for the restoration of Christian unity. It then analyzes progress towards this goal by reviewing the recent theological literature and focusing particularly on the joint statements of the official Lutheran-Catholic dialogues.

Christianity Major Course

POLS A358 Theories of Violence and Liberation
3.00 crs.

The purpose of this course is to bring to bear recent work in political theory on some of the most pressing problems of today. Special emphasis will be given to recent works of noted political thinkers. The focus of the course will be on problems of both international and domestic public policy. Attention will be paid to the ethical implications of such policies, and the ability to question the general assumptions upon which such policies are based.

POLS A359 Political Theories of Human Rights
3.00 crs.

The purpose of this course is to study the work of leading contemporary political theorists on the subject of international human rights, and to consider the relevance of these theories to the current global order. First, the course will investigate whether human rights, as currently understood, are politically relevant. Second, the course will consider how liberal democracies might respond in principle to violations of human rights both at home and abroad. Third, the course will inquire whether the current global order can maintain a commitment to human rights as the world moves further into the 21st century.

MATH A360 Biomathematics
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the development and analysis of mathematical models with biological applications.  Topics include difference equations, stability and bifurcation analysis, population growth, predator-prey models, and models of infectious disease.  This course will also provide an introduction to the software package MATLAB.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A360 Biomathematics
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the development and analysis of mathematical models with biological applications.  Topics include difference equations, stability and bifurcation analysis, population growth, predator-prey models, and models of infectious disease.  This course will also provide an introduction to the software package MATLAB.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
BIOL A360 Cell Biology
3.00 crs.

An analysis of cell structure and function. Topics covered in the course include protein synthesis, the nucleus, cytoplasmic organelles and bioenergetics, endomembrane systems, vesicular transport, the cytoskeleton, cell signaling, cell cycle control, and cancer.

Biology core courses
FREN A360 Femmes de France
3.00 crs.

This course is a cross-disciplinary advanced French course that provides a detailed account of the most influential French women from various disciplines who helped shape the French identity. We will study the accomplishments of Jean d'Arc, Catherine de Medicis, Marie-Antoinette, Marie Curie, Gabrielle Chanel, Simone de Beauvoir, and others. In class we will also examine French feminism as opposed to its American counterpart, gain better understanding of gender roles in French society, and question the relevance of the representations of women in the media, literature, and the arts. 

or equivalent level through placement
POLS A360 Russian Politics
3.00 crs.

The first half of the course focuses on the creation, rise, and fall of the Soviet Union beginning with the February Revolution of 1917 to the collapse in 1991. The course will delve into the complicated and tumultuous transition of the late 1980s and early 1990s that shaped political institutional design, economic development, and cultural issues of national identity, gender relations, and ethnic minority relations. This second half of the course analyzes the political, economic, and cultural institutions, major political players, and contemporary debates in the Russian Federation. Students will also be exposed to theories of revolution, democracy, authoritarianism, democratic transition, state corporatism, and political culture.

BIOL A361 Cell Biology Lab
1.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A360.  Lab fee $100.

Biology core courses
Corequisites:
FREN A361 French Chanson
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of French vocal music from the troubadour tradition of the Middle Ages to the realistic tones of Edith Pilaf to the electronic vibes of Daft Punk and modern-day rap and rai. Students examine how singing has always been a part of the French art de vivre and political scene and has reflected major changes in society. Although students gain insight into all genre and eras, as well as the specifics of the French music industry, special focus will be given to Bell Epoque cabaret music, 20th century drinking songs, WWI and WWI military songs, "chansons realists," and Francophone performers such as Josephine Baker, Jacques Brel, Celine Dion, Cheb Khaled, and Stromae, who have helped French-singing repertoire reach out to global listeners. 

or equivalent level through placement
COSC A361 Languages and Paradigms
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of languages and paradigms. Topics include parameters, data types, abstract data types, storage issues, static/dynamic attributes, and software abstractions. Emphasis is on the procedural paradigm with introduction and comparison to the object-oriented paradigm, the logic paradigm, and other paradigms.

Sophomore
FREN A362 French Fashion
3.00 crs.

Using scholarly and magazine articles, advertisements, commercials, interviews, and films, this course explores the evolution of French fashion from the strict sartorial laws of the Middle Ages to the recent scandals around Dior's firing of former head designer John Galliano. Students will be introduced to the connections between the historical background and the emergence of trends and to the ethical challenges the globalized economy poses to large groups such as LVMH. The course offers a plunge into what makes French fashion unique - pret-a-porter, haute-couture, and craftmanship- and it provides insight into legendary designers such as Chanel, Dior, St. Laurent, and Gaultier. 

or equivalent level through placement
BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

FREN A364 Food and the French
3.00 crs.

In this course, students explore the role and importance of food in French history, society, the media, and the arts. We will look at a variety of sources: cookbooks, newspapers, novels, movies, and writings by Claude Levi-Strauss and some French sociologists. Students investigate the material, and study of French food will serve as a context to review French grammar, vocabulary, and composition skills. We will also cook and eat from time to time.

or equivalent level through placement
PHYS A365 Biomechanics & Neural Control
3.00 crs.

This course will introduce students to biomechanics and the underlying neuromuscular control. The course will start by introducing students to mechanics and theoretical and numerical techniques needed to analyze biomechanical system. The student will then learn some basic anatomical concepts and muscle properties to enable modeling biomechanical system. The course will discuss terrestrial locomotion in some detail before moving to neural control. The students will learn the basics of neural circuitry and how periodic neural activation can facilitate locomotion. The course will end with a numerical project.

PHYS A365 Biomechanics & Neural Control
3.00 crs.

This course will introduce students to biomechanics and the underlying neuromuscular control. The course will start by introducing students to mechanics and theoretical and numerical techniques needed to analyze biomechanical system. The student will then learn some basic anatomical concepts and muscle properties to enable modeling biomechanical system. The course will discuss terrestrial locomotion in some detail before moving to neural control. The students will learn the basics of neural circuitry and how periodic neural activation can facilitate locomotion. The course will end with a numerical project.

BIOL A365 Immunology
3.00 crs.

This course explores the field of experimental cellular and molecular immunology. Topics include organization of the immune system, structure and function of antigen recognition molecules, immune cell interactions, and regulation of the immune system and immunity-related diseases.  Clinical immunology is not emphasized.

Biology core courses
COSC A365 Operating Systems
3.00 crs.

Topics include an introduction to operating systems; process, memory, and storage management; protection and security; distributed systems; and case studies.

Prerequisite
Sophomore
FREN A365 Paris and the Arts
3.00 crs.

For centuries, Paris has been an inspiration and home to artists, writers, and performers, and a place where artistic expression is central to everyday life. This course looks at the art and its cultural context over a broad period of time. Students study great works of art and architecture, and read literary excerpts that help define the intellectual and cultural context of each time period. Course work surveys the French art world, briefly for the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 17th and 18th centuries, and in more detail for the 19th and 20th centuries. As the occasion arises, other forms of artistry may have a place in this course, including the culinary arts, cinema, and music. 

or equivalent level through placement
CRIM A365 Program Planning and Evaluation in Criminal Justice
3.00 crs.

The course examines evaluation research, also called program or policy evaluation, which evaluates the impact of a social intervention such as a crime prevention and/or control program.  Key elements of this type of applied research including methodologies, data collection, and policy implications are reviewed using case studies.  Criminal justice evaluations are assessed including the techniques used to measure the effects of the program or policy against the goals it set out to accomplish, which allow policy makers to engage in subsequent decision-making and make improvements or adjustments.

POLS A365 Soviet and Post Soviet Politics
3.00 crs.

The course will focus on politics in former Soviet countries through films and documentaries. The first section of the course will focus on the creation, rise, and fall of the Soviet Union beginning with the October Revolution of 1917 to the collapse in 1991. The second section of the course will focus on current political, economic, and sociocultural debates in the former Soviet countries that resulted after the triple transition process.

SOCI A365 The Sixties
3.00 crs.

This course offers a social history and a critical analysis of one of the most turbulent, complex, and watershed decades in U.S. history—the 1960s. From its origins in the Cold War culture of the 1950s to the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, the people, events, conflicts, protest movements, ideas, and innovations of the sixties forever changed the socio-political structure and cultural values of the United States, as well as many aspects of the larger world. Particular emphasis is given to understanding the 1960s as a defining era that continues to impact our society today in many significant ways.

RELS A368 Christianity and the Environment
3.00 crs.

This course will involve participants in the developing understanding of the universe and Earth as divine manifestation. We focus particularly on the Creation-affirming tradition within the Christian tradition and discern its capacity to inform contemporary scientific perspectives and interpretations with an appreciation and articulation of their sacred dimension.

Christianity Major Course

FRSC A370 Forensic Psychology
3.00 crs.

The course is suited for individuals who seek careers in law, law enforcement, criminal investigation, corrections, etc.  Familiarizes students with the varied components and applications of forensic psychology. Forensic psychology involves applying psychology to the field of criminal and civil investigation and the law.

RELS A370 Religion and Media
3.00 crs.

This seminar encourages awareness of the manifestations of religion in media -- the uses of media by religious groups, news coverage of media, and the treatment of religious themes in various media --to foster critical consumption and production of media relating to religion.

World Religions Major Course

ENGL A372 Studies in American Cinema
3.00 crs.

This is a special topics course that offers students the opportunity to study film directors, genres, or ideological films.  This course may be repeated when topics change.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A372 Studies in American Cinema
3.00 crs.

This is a special topics course that offers students the opportunity to study film directors, genres, or ideological films.  This course may be repeated when topics change.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A373 The Black Writer in America
3.00 crs.

This course highlights the contributions of African-American writers to the literary traditions of the United States. Those contributions are virtually contemporary with the colonization of North America and shapes the themes and genres of American literature for the next three hundred years: from the slave narrative to local color fiction, from the Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights movement to contemporary writers.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A373 The Black Writer in America
3.00 crs.

This course highlights the contributions of African-American writers to the literary traditions of the United States. Those contributions are virtually contemporary with the colonization of North America and shapes the themes and genres of American literature for the next three hundred years: from the slave narrative to local color fiction, from the Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights movement to contemporary writers.

Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A375 Computational Mathematics
3.00 crs.

This course develops the computational procedures fundamental to numeric applications. Topics include, but are not limited to, error analysis, numerical solutions of non-linear equations, systems of linear equations using direct and iterative methods, polynomial interpolation, quadrature, least squares curve fitting, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. This course does not count as a mathematics elective for the Mathematics major. It is a requirement for the Computational Mathematics major and the Computational Science minor.

or permission of instructor
MATH A375 Computational Mathematics
3.00 crs.

This course develops the computational procedures fundamental to numeric applications. Topics include, but are not limited to, error analysis, numerical solutions of non-linear equations, systems of linear equations using direct and iterative methods, polynomial interpolation, quadrature, least squares curve fitting, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. This course does not count as a mathematics elective for the Mathematics major. It is a requirement for the Computational Mathematics major and the Computational Science minor.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A375 Fundamentals of Biochemistry
3.00 crs.

Fundamentals of Biochemistry is a one-semester course covering underlying theoretical principles and biologically important processes in the field of biochemistry. The course covers the following topics: biological synthesis, structure, and function of proteins and nucleic acids; quantitative enzymology; the molecular basis and regulation of biologically important pathways (such as glycolysis and lipid metabolism); and other selected topics (at the discretion of the instructor). A strong emphasis is placed on the understanding and interpretation of biochemical methods and on engagement with the scientific literature.

CRIM A375 Organized Crime
3.00 crs.

This course covers the nature of organized crime; its history in America; the new forms it takes; theories explaining emergence, development, and persistence; and the unique problems law enforcement encounter in controlling organized crime. Definitions that capture the nature of organized crime as a unique type of criminal activity are discussed as well as new variations of organized crime such as the Russian Mafia and Trans-National Organized Crime.

SOCI A375 U.S. Civil Rights Movement
3.00 crs.

This course provides a social history and critical social movement analysis of the key years of the early U.S. Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1968. Attention is also paid to the historical origins of the Freedom Struggle from slavery up through the years of Reconstruction and Jim Crow Segregation, as well as the movement's aftermath and ongoing sociological impacts on contemporary American society and race relations. Perhaps the most important social movement in our history, the struggle for civil rights helps us understand the role of social protest and activism in bringing about many of the democratic rights and legal protections that we take for granted today. Emphasis is also paid to understanding the various economic, political, and cultural factors that are necessary to create wide-scale social change through the study of the CRM’s major leaders, organizations, protest campaigns, tactics, ideology, and resource base.

ENGL A376 Studies in Technoculture
3.00 crs.

This special topics course investigates the ways culture shapes and is shaped by technology.  It explores the reception, theory, and representation of technology and treats, but is not limited to, questions of poetics, aesthetics, history, politics and the environment.  Specific topics change each semester. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Senior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A376 Studies in Technoculture
3.00 crs.

This special topics course investigates the ways culture shapes and is shaped by technology.  It explores the reception, theory, and representation of technology and treats, but is not limited to, questions of poetics, aesthetics, history, politics and the environment.  Specific topics change each semester. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Senior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CRIM A378 Cybercrime, Technology, and Social Change
3.00 crs.

This course covers crime, victimization, and criminality associated with the emerging technologies that mediate our social relationships, and the massive legal and societal changes as a result of the increased adoption of technologies by society.

CRIM A380 Ethics and Politics of Criminal Justice
3.00 crs.

This course provides an overview of ethics and ethical dilemmas that criminal justice practitioners face in the course of their profession. Students are presented with the underlying rationales to understand these situations when they are encountered and the knowledge needed to properly resolve the issue. Ethical challenges are reviewed from both a historical and contemporary perspective, examining how the challenges were originally handled and if the same outcomes would occur today.

FRSC A380 Forensic Pathology
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to the medical specialty of Forensic Pathology –the practice of laboratory medicine as it applies to the law and legal issues. It examines the basics of forensic science and death investigation, post mortem changes, time of death and identification of the decedent, and types of cases, which fall under the jurisdiction of the medical examiner/coroner including violent, natural and unexplained deaths.

CRIM A385 Seminar in Advanced Criminology
3.00 crs.

Selected topics in the field of criminology are examined in depth through assigned readings and classroom discussion.  Subjects covered in past seminars include: (1) new developments in technology and law enforcement; (2) new directions in criminological theory; (3) fear and risk internationally; (4) experimental criminology; (5) disasters and crime facilitation; (6) immigration and crime; (7) crime mapping; (8) crime profiling; and (9) restorative justice.

ENGL A385 Women Writers
3.00 crs.

This course explores the literary tradition of women writers, reading a variety of texts and genres across a range of history and cultural backgrounds, primarily British and American, considering such issues as the relationship between gender and culture and the impacts of race, class, and sexuality on literary achievement.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A385 Women Writers
3.00 crs.

This course explores the literary tradition of women writers, reading a variety of texts and genres across a range of history and cultural backgrounds, primarily British and American, considering such issues as the relationship between gender and culture and the impacts of race, class, and sexuality on literary achievement.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHYS A395 Special Projects III
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course facilitates a wide range of options for study and outcomes. 

RELS A396 Religious Studies Research Seminar
3.00 crs.

An in-depth research and writing seminar. Topics vary by semester.

MATH A400 Abstract Algebra I
3.00 crs.

This is a general survey course in the concepts of algebra treating number systems, groups, rings, domains, fields, matrices over a field, elements of Galois theory, and canonical forms.

SPAN A400 Advanced Syntax and Composition
3.00 crs.

This course develops and fine-tunes writing skills, including grammar difficulties, problem translations, and complex constructions through readings, in-class exercises, and creative, engaged writing.

or permission of instructor
CHEM A400 Biochemistry I Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the major classes of biological macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and sugars. Physical, chemical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of macromolecules and their behavior are emphasized based on an understanding of the underlying principles of bonding, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Topics covered include protein structure and folding, experimental methods used to characterize and manipulate proteins and DNA, allostery and other types of regulation, molecular disease, enzyme mechanism and inhibition, and membranes. This course is cross-listed with BIOL-A405: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

or permission of instructor
HIST A400 Historiography
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the meaning of history through the eyes of philosophers, theologians, and historians; it studies both philosophies of history and the various approaches to historical investigation. Required of all students majoring in history.

PHIL A400 History of Ancient Philosophy
3.00 crs.

In this course, the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicurean, Skeptics, Stoics, Plotinus, and early Christian thought are discussed.

BIOL A400 Research Proposal
1.00 crs.

Students work with a faculty research adviser to identify an original question in the biological sciences and develop and write a proposal/prospectus to investigate this question. This course is required of all biology honors students and students intending to complete a thesis in biological sciences.

Biology core courses
RELS A400 Theology of Vatican II
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the documents of Vatican II and the changes in Roman Catholicism since Vatican II. Also discussed is why the changes occurred and what fundamental shifts were behind the changes.

Christianity Major Course

MATH A401 Abstract Algebra II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of MATH A400.

CHEM A401 Biochemistry II Lecture
3.00 crs.

This course is a thorough coverage of metabolism and metabolic regulation. It begins with a brief review and expanded treatment of concepts from the first semester course of particular relevance to the study of metabolism such as energetics, membranes and membrane transport, receptors, and enzymes and their regulation. Topics covered include vitamins and cofactors, glycolysis, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, photosynthesis, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. Emphasis is placed on understanding the chemical conversions involved, the interplay between various metabolic processes, and on understanding a variety of metabolic diseases.

CHEM A402 Biochemistry I Lab
1.00 crs.

Students perform selected chemical and instrumental techniques based on lecture material covered in CHEM A400. Topics include: Methods to label or sequence proteins, optical methods, NMR spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, column chromatography, introduction to basic molecular biology methods, and acrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis.  Lab fee $100.

or permission of instructor, CHEM A400 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite
CHEM A402 Biochemistry I Lab
1.00 crs.

Students perform selected chemical and instrumental techniques based on lecture material covered in CHEM A400. Topics include: Methods to label or sequence proteins, optical methods, NMR spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, column chromatography, introduction to basic molecular biology methods, and acrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis.  Lab fee $100.

or permission of instructor, CHEM A400 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite
GREK A402 Greek Historians
3.00 crs.

An intensive study of one or more ancient Greek historians. Students examine the author’s style, influence, philosophy, and assessment regarding his topic. 

or equivalent
BIOL A402 Research Thesis
1.00 crs.

Students work with a faculty research adviser to prepare a written thesis describing their original research and make an oral presentation at the undergraduate research symposium. This course is required of all biology honors students and students intending to complete a thesis in biological sciences.


Corequisite: BIOL A401

ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced writing workshop on the art and craft of creative nonfiction in which students read and write in a wide range of genres such as memoir, autobiography, narrative journalism, personal essay, travel and food writing, profiles, reviews, science and nature writing. Students complete a portfolio of revised original short creative nonfiction.

Junior, Either ENGL T122 or ENGL A205 AND either ENGL A208 or ENGL A211
ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced writing workshop on the art and craft of creative nonfiction in which students read and write in a wide range of genres such as memoir, autobiography, narrative journalism, personal essay, travel and food writing, profiles, reviews, science and nature writing. Students complete a portfolio of revised original short creative nonfiction.

Junior, Either ENGL T122 or ENGL A205 AND either ENGL A208 or ENGL A211
ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced writing workshop on the art and craft of creative nonfiction in which students read and write in a wide range of genres such as memoir, autobiography, narrative journalism, personal essay, travel and food writing, profiles, reviews, science and nature writing. Students complete a portfolio of revised original short creative nonfiction.

Junior, Either ENGL T122 or ENGL A205 AND either ENGL A208 or ENGL A211
ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced writing workshop on the art and craft of creative nonfiction in which students read and write in a wide range of genres such as memoir, autobiography, narrative journalism, personal essay, travel and food writing, profiles, reviews, science and nature writing. Students complete a portfolio of revised original short creative nonfiction.

Junior, Either ENGL T122 or ENGL A205 AND either ENGL A208 or ENGL A211
HIST A404 Documentary & Oral Histories
3.00 crs.

This class uses the methodology of oral history to explore an aspect of the history of New Orleans through interviews. Students use A/V equipment to preserve their interviews and they use the information they gather to write term papers and produce documentaries.  The focus of this course varies each semester.

SPAN A404 Immigration
3.00 crs.

This course incorporates service-learning with the New Orleans Latino community, and includes readings and films about the problems of being an immigrant. In particular, the course addresses the problems of immigrants from and within the Spanish-speaking world, including Spain. In-class discussions about these topics, lectures by guest-speakers, and the service-learning component culminate in written compositions reflecting on the issues and how we can better know the "other" in our midst.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
COSC A405 Artificial Intelligence
3.00 crs.

This course teaches the fundamentals of artificial intelligence, including problem solving techniques, search, heuristic methods, and knowledge representation. Topics include ALL programming, expert systems, and an introduction to natural language processing.

Sophomore
Corequisites:
BIOL A405 Biochemistry I
3.00 crs.

This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the major classes of biological macromolecules: Proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and sugars. Physical, chemical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of macromolecules and their behavior are emphasized based on an understanding of the underlying principles of bonding, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Topics covered include protein structure and folding, experimental methods used to characterize and manipulate proteins and DNA, allostery and other types of regulation, molecular disease, enzyme mechanism and inhibition, and membranes. This course is cross-listed with CHEM-A400: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

CRIM A405 Criminal Law
3.00 crs.

This course examines criminal law, that class of societal norms defined by the political state as public wrongs and subject to adjudication in criminal courts, under state authority, as felonies or misdemeanors.  Subject matter includes sources of criminal law; theories of punishment; corpus delicti and basic elements of crime; specific offenses; principles of liability to punishment; and specific defenses to criminal behavior.

ENGL A405 Editing and Publishing
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the student writer to the world of contemporary editing and publishing, print and digital, with an emphasis on an understanding of these as they affect both the creative writer and the writer of nonfiction.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A405 Editing and Publishing
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the student writer to the world of contemporary editing and publishing, print and digital, with an emphasis on an understanding of these as they affect both the creative writer and the writer of nonfiction.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHIL A405 History of Medieval Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course offers an historical study of the main ideas of the medieval period from St. Augustine to the Renaissance.

ENGL A406 Internship: Editing and Publishing
3.00 crs.

In this course students work on the editing and publication of the New Orleans Review, a nationally-distributed literary journal published at Loyola since 1968. Students work with the editorial staff to produce an issue of the print journal and to maintain the journal’s website.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A406 Internship: Editing and Publishing
3.00 crs.

In this course students work on the editing and publication of the New Orleans Review, a nationally-distributed literary journal published at Loyola since 1968. Students work with the editorial staff to produce an issue of the print journal and to maintain the journal’s website.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A406 Machine Learning
3.00 crs.

Machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. Topics include effective machine learning techniques, implementation, and the theoretical underpinnings of learning and AI.

Sophomore
PHIL A408 Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas
3.00 crs.

This course offers an introduction to the central philosophical positions of Thomas Aquinas. It examines Aquinas' views on the relationship between faith and reason, his metaphysics of being, his analysis of human knowledge, his theory of human nature, and his defense of human freedom. Special attention is also devoted to the Greek and Arabic sources of Aquinas' philosophy and to his place in the history of medieval philosophy.

ENGL A408 Writing: Technique and Technology
3.00 crs.

This class addresses the ways in which the task of composition changes in digital and online contexts. It is divided equally between tutorials on digital composition best practices and historical and theoretical perspectives on writing and technology. The course requires substantial computer work, but no prior experience is necessary.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A408 Writing: Technique and Technology
3.00 crs.

This class addresses the ways in which the task of composition changes in digital and online contexts. It is divided equally between tutorials on digital composition best practices and historical and theoretical perspectives on writing and technology. The course requires substantial computer work, but no prior experience is necessary.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A409 Contemporary Topics in Rhetoric
3.00 crs.

This course examines significant trends in contemporary theories of rhetoric and the writing process with special emphasis on how these theories relate to the teaching of composition at all levels.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A409 Contemporary Topics in Rhetoric
3.00 crs.

This course examines significant trends in contemporary theories of rhetoric and the writing process with special emphasis on how these theories relate to the teaching of composition at all levels.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A410 Advanced Calculus I
3.00 crs.

This course offers a deeper look at analysis with special attention to linear methods as applied to the calculus of several variables. Topics include extrema, Jacobians, uniform continuity, line and surface integrals, differentials, integration theory, and series.

MATH A410 Advanced Calculus I
3.00 crs.

This course offers a deeper look at analysis with special attention to linear methods as applied to the calculus of several variables. Topics include extrema, Jacobians, uniform continuity, line and surface integrals, differentials, integration theory, and series.

GREK A410 Greek Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is an intensive survey of one or two ancient Greek philosophers. Students examine the author’s style, influence, and place within the historical and social context of philosophy. 

or equivalent
PHIL A410 History of Modern European Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course discusses readings from works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

CHEM A410 Instrumental Analysis
4.00 crs.

This combined lecture/lab course develops the principles of instrumental analysis.  Students learn advanced principles of electrochemical, spectrochemical, and chromatographic analysis.  Laboratory components provide hands-on training.  Topics include instrumentation, sample preparation, data analysis, and recent developments in analytical techniques, with a focus on applications in industry and graduate academic labs. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A320

 

SPAN A410 Spanish-American Regional Literature
3.00 crs.

In this course, students study of the literature and culture of a particular region, nation, or culture in Latin America.  For example, the Caribbean, the River Plate, the Andean region, Central America, Puerto Rico, or Mexico may be the focus of study. Repeatable when topic varies.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
TEAC A410 Teaching Residency I
3.00 crs.

This course requires students to spend a minimum of 60% of the instructional day in their assigned school. Students will work under the direction of a mentor teacher and participate in all appropriate educational activities. A college supervisor will complete on-site observations and conferences with the student resident. Fee $100.

Senior, Students must apply for teaching residency and receive permission from the Office of Teacher Education the semester before they take the teaching residency and methods class.
CRIM A410 Women and Crime
3.00 crs.

The study and practice of crime and criminal justice has historically neglected how women’s experiences as perpetrators and victims differ from males, and how these differences may affect policy and practice. Also neglected women’s experiences as professionals in the system and the acceptance of women as competent and effective, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, defenders, judges, and so on. The rate of female offending is growing more rapidly than certain rates of male offending, and women make up a large percentage of victims of crime, especially violent crime.

ENGL A410 Writing Gender
3.00 crs.

The course examines the impact of contemporary feminist thought on rhetorical theory and introduces students to writing practices resulting from that impact. Readings from leading feminist theorists, critics, and literary authors provide a foundation for nonfiction writing assignments that combine personal experience with critical theory and encourage experimentation with voice and form.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A410 Writing Gender
3.00 crs.

The course examines the impact of contemporary feminist thought on rhetorical theory and introduces students to writing practices resulting from that impact. Readings from leading feminist theorists, critics, and literary authors provide a foundation for nonfiction writing assignments that combine personal experience with critical theory and encourage experimentation with voice and form.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A411 Advanced Calculus II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of MATH A410.

ENGL A411 Fiction Workshop
3.00 crs.

This course examines advanced topics in the writing of fiction, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. The course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. In addition to writing short fiction, students read extensively and analyze contemporary fiction.

Junior
RELS A411 Hindu Theology
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the rise and development of Hindu theistic thought in the millennium following Shankara (788 — 820 A.D.) The schools of identity, of difference, and of difference-in-identity are studied critically.

World Religions Major Course

ENGL A412 Poetry Workshop
3.00 crs.

The course examines advanced topics in the writing of poetry, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. The course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. In addition to writing poems, students read extensively and analyze contemporary poetry.

Junior
TEAC A412 Teaching Residency II
6.00 crs.

This course requires students to spend a minimum of 80% of the instructional day in their assigned school. Students will work under the direction of a mentor teacher and participate in all appropriate educational activities. A college supervisor will complete on-site observations and conferences with the student resident. Fee $100.

Senior
MATH A415 Complex Variables
3.00 crs.

This course studies the theory of analytic functions. Topics include Cauchy's integration theory, series representation, analytic continuation and conformal mappings.

MATH A415 Complex Variables
3.00 crs.

This course studies the theory of analytic functions. Topics include Cauchy's integration theory, series representation, analytic continuation and conformal mappings.

ENGL A415 Creative Writing Workshop
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced special topics workshop that focuses on a select topic or genre such as film writing, nature writing, travel writing, flash fiction/prose poetry, and experimental writing. In addition to writing, critiquing, and revising their own work, students read widely and critique published work related to the topic. Students complete a portfolio of revised original creative writing related to the topic. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior
PSYC A415 Psychopharmacology
3.00 crs.

This course covers principles of pharmacology and includes a detailed study of therapeutic and abused drug classes that affect psychological functioning and behavior. Mechanisms of action, neurobiological bases, clinical applications, tolerance and dependence, side effects, and abuse potentials are considered.

or permission of instructor
PSYC A415 Psychopharmacology
3.00 crs.

This course covers principles of pharmacology and includes a detailed study of therapeutic and abused drug classes that affect psychological functioning and behavior. Mechanisms of action, neurobiological bases, clinical applications, tolerance and dependence, side effects, and abuse potentials are considered.

or permission of instructor
PHIL A416 History of 19th-century Philosophy
3.00 crs.

A survey of the major traditions in post-Kantian philosophy ending with Nietzsche, this course explores the interrelations between different themes in 19th-century thought and how they laid the foundation for 20th-century philosophy.

PSYC A416 Sensation and Perception
3.00 crs.

This course is an intensive study of sensory processes and perceptual organization.

ENGL A417 Playwriting Workshop
3.00 crs.

This course is a workshop examining the writing of plays as well as aspects of writing film scripts. In addition to writing dramatic exercises and plays, students read extensively and analyze examples of plays and films.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A417 Playwriting Workshop
3.00 crs.

This course is a workshop examining the writing of plays as well as aspects of writing film scripts. In addition to writing dramatic exercises and plays, students read extensively and analyze examples of plays and films.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A417 Sensation and Perception Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in sensation and perception which parallels and complements PSYC A416. Included are experiments in classical psychophysics. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A416.  Lab fee $50.

RELS A417 Women, Religion, and Culture
3.00 crs.

This course investigates the mutual impact of religious belief and gender roles: Special topics include the origin of patriarchy, structures of patriarchy, function of shamanism in women’s lives, women in patriarchal religions, violence perpetuated against women in patriarchal cultures/religions, and women creating women’s religion.

World Religions Major Course

PSYC A420 Behavior Therapy
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of theoretical bases and techniques used in modifying behavior in educational and therapeutic settings.

GREK A420 Greek Oratory
3.00 crs.

A survey of the speeches of the Greek orators. These readings reveal the development of early Greek prose and provide a window into many interesting scenarios from life in Classical Athens as well as provide evidence for the function of Greek oratory in Athenian democracy. 

or equivalent
CRIM A420 Serial Murder: Myths vs. Realities
3.00 crs.

The course familiarizes students with the field of serial murder. Despite an almost mythical interest in the phenomenon, relatively few scientific studies have been undertaken on the prevalence, etiology, investigation, and understanding of the crime. Biological, psychological, and sociological explanations of serial murder are examined as well as key investigative techniques including psychological and geographical profiling.

TEAC A420 Teaching Residency Seminar
3.00 crs.

The Teaching Residency Seminar focuses on specific issues related to teaching in a secondary school. Focus areas will include instructional goal-setting and planning; instructional delivery models; analysis of student assessment data; collaboration with other faculty members; and conference and communication skills. The seminar context will support presentations by experts in the field, informal discussions, and analysis of student work.

The curriculum contained in this catalog is subject to changes based upon the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education's review and approval of the university's redesigned teacher preparation curriculum. Check with the Dean's office to obtain a copy of the BESE-approved curriculum.

ENGL A420 Tudor and Stuart Drama
3.00 crs.

From magic and mistaken identity to revenge and jealousy, English Renaissance playwrights created a vibrant theatrical world that defined an age. This course explores non-Shakespearean drama spanning from the 1550s, before the first public theaters were built, through the tense moments before Parliament closed them in 1642. We consider how dramatists engaged the conventions of classical drama and used their craft to confront changing attitudes about religion, politics, gender, and economy.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A420 Tudor and Stuart Drama
3.00 crs.

From magic and mistaken identity to revenge and jealousy, English Renaissance playwrights created a vibrant theatrical world that defined an age. This course explores non-Shakespearean drama spanning from the 1550s, before the first public theaters were built, through the tense moments before Parliament closed them in 1642. We consider how dramatists engaged the conventions of classical drama and used their craft to confront changing attitudes about religion, politics, gender, and economy.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A422 Cognitive Neuroscience
3.00 crs.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the cognitive processes underlying human behavior, their experimental origins, and their theoretical significance.

ENGL A422 Studies in Renaissance Literature
3.00 crs.

This seminar explores the development of a specific theme or genre in a transnational early modern context. Topics include Renaissance Women Writers, Renaissance Epic, The Literature of Empire, or Gender and Sexuality in Renaissance Literature. Primary texts are drawn from both English and continental literatures, while secondary readings include current critical and theoretical approaches, making this course excellent preparation for graduate study in literary and cultural fields. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A422 Studies in Renaissance Literature
3.00 crs.

This seminar explores the development of a specific theme or genre in a transnational early modern context. Topics include Renaissance Women Writers, Renaissance Epic, The Literature of Empire, or Gender and Sexuality in Renaissance Literature. Primary texts are drawn from both English and continental literatures, while secondary readings include current critical and theoretical approaches, making this course excellent preparation for graduate study in literary and cultural fields. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A423 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A422.  Lab fee $50.

PSYC A423 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A422.  Lab fee $50.

PSYC A423 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A422.  Lab fee $50.

ENGL A424 Medieval Drama
3.00 crs.

This course surveys Roman-style comedies, Latin liturgical drama and Anglo-Norman religious plays in medieval England before turning to Middle English biblical, morality and saints' plays. Dramatic texts are supplemented by non-dramatic literature. Music, theological writing, and visual materials are considered with some emphasis placed on stagecraft.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A424 Medieval Drama
3.00 crs.

This course surveys Roman-style comedies, Latin liturgical drama and Anglo-Norman religious plays in medieval England before turning to Middle English biblical, morality and saints' plays. Dramatic texts are supplemented by non-dramatic literature. Music, theological writing, and visual materials are considered with some emphasis placed on stagecraft.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A425 Computer Graphics
3.00 crs.

Topics include review of vector analysis and matrices; 3D wireframe pipeline framework; window to viewport transform; clipping algorithms; matrix description of 2D and 3D transforms; projections and perspective transforms; view transform; and some concepts in computational geometry.

MATH A425 General Topology
3.00 crs.

This course studies basic concepts from the topics of topological spaces, Hausdorff spaces, connectedness, metric spaces, continuous mappings, separability, compactness, and product spaces.

Permission of instructor
ENGL A425 Restoration/18th-century Literature
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major poets and prose writers of the Restoration and the 18th century with an emphasis on Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Boswell.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A425 Restoration/18th-century Literature
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major poets and prose writers of the Restoration and the 18th century with an emphasis on Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Boswell.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CRIM A425 Seminar on Major Works in Criminology
3.00 crs.

Students are engaged to think critically and analytically by reading, understanding, and evaluating the original works of criminological scholars and exemplars; students will learn to appreciate the social and political and theoretical contexts that ‘situate’ key ideas that have shaped societies’ understanding of what crime is, the causes of crime, response to crime, and punishment of crime. Class discussions examine the impact of scholarly works on the fields of courts, policing, and corrections.

ENGL A426 18th-century British Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the development of the novel in England through the French Revolution, with readings from Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A426 18th-century British Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the development of the novel in England through the French Revolution, with readings from Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
COSC A426 Game Programming
3.00 crs.

This course is for individuals interested in becoming a game programmer, game designer, or game artist. Students learn how to make video games using the industry tools and practices of game development. The course takes students from intermediate programmers to designers of stunning 3D games. By the end of the course, students will have completed multiple hands-on projects and will be able to leverage an array of game development techniques to design and create their own video games.

ENGL A427 Romanticism
3.00 crs.

This course in British Romanticism is fundamentally about revolution. It begins with the historical context of revolution in France, America, and industrial production, and examines shifting conceptions of society and the self in the aftermath of those revolutions. It focuses on revolutions in poetry and the novel in texts by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Byron, Keats, the Shelleys, and more.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A427 Romanticism
3.00 crs.

This course in British Romanticism is fundamentally about revolution. It begins with the historical context of revolution in France, America, and industrial production, and examines shifting conceptions of society and the self in the aftermath of those revolutions. It focuses on revolutions in poetry and the novel in texts by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Byron, Keats, the Shelleys, and more.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A428 Psychology of Learning
3.00 crs.

This course is an examination of contemporary theories and problems of learning.

ENGL A428 Victorian England
3.00 crs.

This course examines Victorian England, which saw major changes in structures of class, ethnicity and gender, an expanding empire, and a revolution in how things were made and who made them. The course looks at innovations in narrative and poetic form at the intersection of what Victorians called “Life and Art,” in essays by Arnold, Pater, and Wilde; poetry by Tennyson, the Brownings, the Brontës, the Rossettis, Hopkins, and Hardy; and fiction by Dickens, George Eliot, and Thackeray, and more.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A428 Victorian England
3.00 crs.

This course examines Victorian England, which saw major changes in structures of class, ethnicity and gender, an expanding empire, and a revolution in how things were made and who made them. The course looks at innovations in narrative and poetic form at the intersection of what Victorians called “Life and Art,” in essays by Arnold, Pater, and Wilde; poetry by Tennyson, the Brownings, the Brontës, the Rossettis, Hopkins, and Hardy; and fiction by Dickens, George Eliot, and Thackeray, and more.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A429 19th-century British Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of A426, examining the development of the novel in the 19th century with study of the works of Austen, the Brontës, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, among others.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A429 19th-century British Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of A426, examining the development of the novel in the 19th century with study of the works of Austen, the Brontës, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, among others.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A429 Animal Operant Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in the operant conditioning of the laboratory rat. It is an obligatory optional lab to accompany PSYC A428. Lab fee $75.

ENGL A430 20th-century British Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of A426 and A429, examining the fiction of writers such as Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf with some attention given to contemporary fiction.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A430 20th-century British Fiction
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of A426 and A429, examining the fiction of writers such as Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf with some attention given to contemporary fiction.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
MATH A430 Applied Math I
3.00 crs.

This course illustrates the application of mathematics to one or more fields by considering the aspects of model building, and further develops theory and techniques relevant to the needs of the field. Topics include partial differential equations, Eigen functions, Green’s functions, perturbation, and approximation methods.

MATH A430 Applied Math I
3.00 crs.

This course illustrates the application of mathematics to one or more fields by considering the aspects of model building, and further develops theory and techniques relevant to the needs of the field. Topics include partial differential equations, Eigen functions, Green’s functions, perturbation, and approximation methods.

COSC A430 Database Management Systems
3.00 crs.

This course is concerned with the internals and externals of database management systems, as well as data modeling techniques. Topics include features of database management systems (DBMS) and database users; data modeling; relational data models and languages; constraints and triggers; system aspects; object-oriented databases; logical query languages; data storage; query processing and optimization; transaction processing and concurrency control; and information integration.

Sophomore
CRIM A430 Legal Research and Writing
3.00 crs.

This course bridges the gap between essay style writing taught to undergraduates and the more technical writing of lawyers and other criminal justice professionals. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of legal research and writing to develop the skills necessary to prepare a legal memorandum and other technical tasks in the criminal justice professions. Prerequisite: COMP C119 or equivalent.

PSYC A430 Psychology of Human Aging
3.00 crs.

The primary objective of this course is to provide a broad overview to the study of human aging. The basic focus deals with the experience of human aging in modern society. Consideration is given to research and theories concerning the aging process, some of which include: physiological, social, and psychological stability, changes, and alterations across the adult lifespan. 

PSYC A430 Psychology of Human Aging
3.00 crs.

The primary objective of this course is to provide a broad overview to the study of human aging. The basic focus deals with the experience of human aging in modern society. Consideration is given to research and theories concerning the aging process, some of which include: physiological, social, and psychological stability, changes, and alterations across the adult lifespan. 

PHIL A435 Existentialism
3.00 crs.

This course examines the treatment of the characteristic existential themes as exemplified in the writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Jaspers, Marcel, and Sartre.

LATN A435 Medieval Latin
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on works from the authors who offer a glimpse into the intellectual world of the Medieval period. Discussions include the influence of ancient authors as well as the historical and cultural contexts of the Medieval writers. 

or equivalent
PHYS A436 Cellular Biophysics
3.00 crs.

This course is concerned with selected physiological phenomena occurring in biological cells, such as action potential in neurons. Although these are fundamentally biological phenomena, the analysis is inherently multidisciplinary, involving both physical and chemical principles. The course also introduces students to basic mathematical modeling of biophysical phenomena.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHYS A436 Cellular Biophysics
3.00 crs.

This course is concerned with selected physiological phenomena occurring in biological cells, such as action potential in neurons. Although these are fundamentally biological phenomena, the analysis is inherently multidisciplinary, involving both physical and chemical principles. The course also introduces students to basic mathematical modeling of biophysical phenomena.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHYS A437 Introduction to Neural Networks and Applications
3.00 crs.

The course provides an introduction to the field fo neural networks, and illustrates how they can be combined with the method of reinforcement learning in order to solve optimization problems. No particular background is required, as the course is self-contained and the needed mathematical tools will be developed in class.

PHYS A437 Introduction to Neural Networks and Applications
3.00 crs.

The course provides an introduction to the field fo neural networks, and illustrates how they can be combined with the method of reinforcement learning in order to solve optimization problems. No particular background is required, as the course is self-contained and the needed mathematical tools will be developed in class.

PHYS A438 Introduction to Astrophysics
3.00 crs.

This introduction to astrophysics is an elective course for the physics major sequences.  Topics include the physical principles of the tools of astronomy; the physics of stars and planetary systems; galaxies and cosmology. 

PHYS A438 Introduction to Astrophysics
3.00 crs.

This introduction to astrophysics is an elective course for the physics major sequences.  Topics include the physical principles of the tools of astronomy; the physics of stars and planetary systems; galaxies and cosmology. 

PHYS A438 Introduction to Astrophysics
3.00 crs.

This introduction to astrophysics is an elective course for the physics major sequences.  Topics include the physical principles of the tools of astronomy; the physics of stars and planetary systems; galaxies and cosmology. 

ENGL A438 Southern Literature
3.00 crs.

This course examines the literature of perhaps the most distinctive region of the United States: the American South. From its colonial roots, through slavery and secession and civil war and reconstruction, from its twentieth-century renascence to its presumed disappearance into the homogeneity of twenty-first century America, this literary tradition offers a peculiarly rich perspective on our national identity.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A438 Southern Literature
3.00 crs.

This course examines the literature of perhaps the most distinctive region of the United States: the American South. From its colonial roots, through slavery and secession and civil war and reconstruction, from its twentieth-century renascence to its presumed disappearance into the homogeneity of twenty-first century America, this literary tradition offers a peculiarly rich perspective on our national identity.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHIL A440 Phenomenology
3.00 crs.

This course treats the problems which gave rise to contemporary phenomenology, existential phenomenology, and hermeneutic phenomenology, and various writers in that tradition, such as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, and Ricoeur.

PSYC A440 Theories of Personality
3.00 crs.

This course is a review and critical evaluation of major personality theories and their supporting evidence with readings from original sources.

and one additional PSYCA***
PSYC A441 Clinical Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course includes a brief history of clinical psychology, roles of the modern clinical psychologist, description of assessment and therapy techniques, current journal articles, experiential exercises to illustrate some areas of discussion, and an integrative final paper.

PSYC A441 Clinical Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course includes a brief history of clinical psychology, roles of the modern clinical psychologist, description of assessment and therapy techniques, current journal articles, experiential exercises to illustrate some areas of discussion, and an integrative final paper.

COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
3.00 crs.

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
3.00 crs.

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
3.00 crs.

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

RELS A441 Psychology of Religion
3.00 crs.

This course is a general introduction to the psychological study of religious behavior, comprising a short history of the subject with special attention to classic writings since 1890, a review of outstanding theories and methods, and a representative sampling of recent research, especially on personality and developments.

Christianity Major Course

ENGL A444 Posthumanism
3.00 crs.

This course is a comparative media investigation of a variety of topics under the heading of posthumanism. Focusing on a selection of novels, film, and video games concerned with technological and/or biological augmentations, we will explore such questions as what does it mean to be human or is "human" even a meaningful category, what is the relationship between science and nurture, and what is the work of the humanities in a posthuman condition.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A444 Posthumanism
3.00 crs.

This course is a comparative media investigation of a variety of topics under the heading of posthumanism. Focusing on a selection of novels, film, and video games concerned with technological and/or biological augmentations, we will explore such questions as what does it mean to be human or is "human" even a meaningful category, what is the relationship between science and nurture, and what is the work of the humanities in a posthuman condition.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHYS A445 Advanced Laboratory Physics
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced laboratory course for physics majors with the objective of training students to be self-reliant in planning and performing experiments not ordinarily done at the elementary level. Experiments are performed in such areas as electronics, mechanics, atomic physics and spectroscopy and emphasis is placed on experimental error analysis.  Lab fee $50.

PHYS A445 Advanced Laboratory Physics
3.00 crs.

This is an advanced laboratory course for physics majors with the objective of training students to be self-reliant in planning and performing experiments not ordinarily done at the elementary level. Experiments are performed in such areas as electronics, mechanics, atomic physics and spectroscopy and emphasis is placed on experimental error analysis.  Lab fee $50.

PHYS A450 Quantum Mechanics
4.00 crs.

This course gives an introductory treatment of quantum mechanics. Starting with the experimental evidence, it introduces the Schroedinger and Heisenberg formulations of quantum theory, discusses basic properties of the Schroedinger equation and provides an elementary introduction to axiomatic structure of quantum mechanics.

PHYS A450 Quantum Mechanics
4.00 crs.

This course gives an introductory treatment of quantum mechanics. Starting with the experimental evidence, it introduces the Schroedinger and Heisenberg formulations of quantum theory, discusses basic properties of the Schroedinger equation and provides an elementary introduction to axiomatic structure of quantum mechanics.

COSC A451 Software Engineering
3.00 crs.

This course describes engineering processes and their application to the development of software.

Prerequisite
Sophomore
SPAN A455 20th Century Currents
3.00 crs.

This course offers readings and discussion of contemporary literary trends, including Spanish and/or Spanish American film. Topics vary but may include the Generation of 1898, theater of protest in Spain, modernism, fantastic literature, Indigenista literature of Latin America, or Latin-American women writers. Repeatable when subject varies.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
PSYC A455 Emotion and Motivation
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of contemporary theories, research, and critical review of their relevant problems.

and 9 hours of PSYCA***
PSYC A455 Emotion and Motivation
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of contemporary theories, research, and critical review of their relevant problems.

and 9 hours of PSYCA***
PHYS A455 Gravitational Wave Physics
3.00 crs.

The course provides an introduction to the physics of gravitational waves. Background material in relativity (the special and general theories) will be developed. Particular attention will be paid to experiments that test Einstein's relativity as well as techniques used in the detection of gravitational waves. Topics will also include the astrophysical and cosmological sources of gravitational waves.

PHYS A455 Gravitational Wave Physics
3.00 crs.

The course provides an introduction to the physics of gravitational waves. Background material in relativity (the special and general theories) will be developed. Particular attention will be paid to experiments that test Einstein's relativity as well as techniques used in the detection of gravitational waves. Topics will also include the astrophysical and cosmological sources of gravitational waves.

SPAN A456 Spanish-American Narrative
3.00 crs.

This course offers readings and discussions of Latin-American novels and/or short stories.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
SPAN A457 Spanish Golden-Age Literature
3.00 crs.

This course offers readings and discussions of selected works, including prose, drama, and/or poetry, by 16th and 17th centuries Spanish authors such as Cervantes, Lope de Vega and Calderon.

Any SPAN A300-level course or permission of instructor
PSYC A459 Naturalistic Observation Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory course addresses the ways that behavioral data can be obtained through systematic, unbiased, naturalistic observations. Topics include sources of bias, scheduling observations, ethograms, and sampling techniques.

or permission of instructor
PSYC A459 Naturalistic Observation Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory course addresses the ways that behavioral data can be obtained through systematic, unbiased, naturalistic observations. Topics include sources of bias, scheduling observations, ethograms, and sampling techniques.

or permission of instructor
PHIL A465 Introduction to Analytic Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the movement of 20th-century Anglo-American analytic philosophy as practiced by Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, the logical positivists, ordinary language analysts, Quine, and contemporary language analysts.

ENGL A466 Southern Women Writers
3.00 crs.

This course explores the contributions of women writers to the distinctiveness of the South, the range of their achievement as artists, and the complex relationships they developed with each other and to the structures of their singularly traditional culture.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A466 Southern Women Writers
3.00 crs.

This course explores the contributions of women writers to the distinctiveness of the South, the range of their achievement as artists, and the complex relationships they developed with each other and to the structures of their singularly traditional culture.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A470 Film and the Art of Literary Adaptation
3.00 crs.

This course provides students with an understanding of how a work of literature is translated into a film. The core material for the course varies from semester to semester, but is comprised of fiction that has successfully been adapted to the screen, especially short stories, novels, and theatrical plays. The course also deals with films created from classic drama, including Shakespeare, as well as folklore and historical records.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A470 Film and the Art of Literary Adaptation
3.00 crs.

This course provides students with an understanding of how a work of literature is translated into a film. The core material for the course varies from semester to semester, but is comprised of fiction that has successfully been adapted to the screen, especially short stories, novels, and theatrical plays. The course also deals with films created from classic drama, including Shakespeare, as well as folklore and historical records.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A470 History and Systems of Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course for majors addresses those historical antecedents to contemporary psychology as well as the several systems or schools of psychology that have given direction to the discipline.

RELS A470 The Spirituality of the Nature Writers
3.00 crs.

This course utilizes an interpretive methodology to probe the deeper spiritual meaning, significance, and relevance of the nature writers as spiritual guides who immerse themselves in the mysteries of Creation and share their experience through words, films, music, and other art forms.

World Religions Major Course

COSC A471 Communication and Network Systems
3.00 crs.

This course explores the fundamental issues in computer networking. The course is intended to provide students with knowledge and understanding of basic concepts in networks and protocols. Frequently used protocols are used to illustrate the concepts and to provide insight into practical networks.

Sophomore
ENGL A472 Studies in Global Cinema
3.00 crs.

This is a special topics course exploring European cinemas, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in relation to the individual cultures from which they arise. Aesthetic and sociocultural differences between these national cinemas and Hollywood are stressed. The specific topic changes each term. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A472 Studies in Global Cinema
3.00 crs.

This is a special topics course exploring European cinemas, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in relation to the individual cultures from which they arise. Aesthetic and sociocultural differences between these national cinemas and Hollywood are stressed. The specific topic changes each term. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A474 Studies in Global Literature
3.00 crs.

This seminar explores the development of a specific theme or genre in contemporary global literature and/or cinema. Topics vary by semester, but might include Magical Realism, the African Novel, or Global Human Rights Literature.  Primary texts are drawn from African, Asian, Caribbean, and/or Latin American traditions. Students gain facility with theoretical trends that challenge traditional critical perspectives and foreground those that emerge from the global South. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A474 Studies in Global Literature
3.00 crs.

This seminar explores the development of a specific theme or genre in contemporary global literature and/or cinema. Topics vary by semester, but might include Magical Realism, the African Novel, or Global Human Rights Literature.  Primary texts are drawn from African, Asian, Caribbean, and/or Latin American traditions. Students gain facility with theoretical trends that challenge traditional critical perspectives and foreground those that emerge from the global South. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A476 Great Figures– Renaissance
3.00 crs.

This course is an intensive study of one or two great medieval literary figures. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A476 Great Figures– Renaissance
3.00 crs.

This course is an intensive study of one or two great medieval literary figures. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A478 Great Figures– 19th-century
3.00 crs.

This special topics course is an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the 19th century. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A478 Great Figures– 19th-century
3.00 crs.

This special topics course is an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the 19th century. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A479 Great Figures - American Pre-1900
3.00 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great American literary figures of the pre-1900s. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. Authors may include, Melville, Hawthorne, Thoreau and Emerson, and Henry James.This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A479 Great Figures - American Pre-1900
3.00 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great American literary figures of the pre-1900s. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. Authors may include, Melville, Hawthorne, Thoreau and Emerson, and Henry James.This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
SPAN A480 Spanish Senior Capstone
1.00 crs.

A Capstone course required of all majors. Students work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor. The Capstone reflects the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a Languages and Cultures major.

CRIM A480 Capstone
3.00 crs.

The capstone course, taken in the senior year, is designed to offer students the opportunity to complete an original research project in collaboration with or under the supervision of a faculty member, or to complete a substantial writing project designed to prepare the student to enter his/her field of choice. In addition, students perfect their resumes, participate in mock interviewing, and apply for jobs, as part of the requirement. The course is both writing and presentation intensive and is designed to prepare students to enter the job market and/or graduate school.

FREN A480 Capstone
1.00 crs.

Capstone course required of all majors. Student work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor. Capstone work should reflect the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a Languages and Cultures major.

CLHU A480 Capstone: Special Topics
1.00 crs.

The capstone presents students with the opportunity to showcase their tools and techniques for analysis, interpretation, and research of literature and material culture necessary to pursuing a successful career in Classical Studies at all levels. 

LAS A480 Latin American Studies Senior Capstone
1.00 crs.

Required of all LAS majors: Students work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor. The capstone course reflects the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a Languages and Cultures major.

POLS A480 Political Science Senior Capstone
3.00 crs.

The main project for this course is a research paper, with a variety of topics, supervised by the entire faculty of the department. In addition, students will have an opportunity to discuss and critique the department curriculum, and to engage in conversations with guest speakers on current issues in each of the major subfields of the discipline.

SOCI A480 Senior Capstone
3.00 crs.

Students enroll in this course in conjunction with the Capstone Professional Development course, SOCI A481. In this course, students work one-to-one with a faculty mentor on an original research project. Students are responsible for all aspects of the project, from research design, identifying or collecting data, data analysis and interpretation, to presenting the results of their research in a public forum at the end of the semester. This course combines the elements of a seminar with sociological research and helps students pull their undergraduate learning together in a meaningful way as they “do sociology” outside of the classroom. It is an opportunity to integrate the theories, concepts, and methods of the discipline.

SOCI A481 Capstone Professional Development
1.00 crs.

Students enroll in this course in conjunction with the Capstone Research Project, SOCI A480. This course is designed to help prepare graduating students for their professional futures. Students complete a number of assignments including a mock interview, resume development, the Sociology Major Field Test, and attend an information session on graduate school and one of our faculty colloquium research presentations.

Corequisites:
ENGL A485 Interpretive Approaches
3.00 crs.

This course looks at influential developments in literary theory and cultural criticism across the twentieth century and up to the present.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A485 Interpretive Approaches
3.00 crs.

This course looks at influential developments in literary theory and cultural criticism across the twentieth century and up to the present.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A485 Practicum in Applied Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course involves supervised field experience in cooperation with New Orleans area agencies. On-campus meetings and written assignments are required.

Advanced junior standing, Permission of instructor
CHEM A486 Chemistry Seminar for Majors
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. 

ENGL A487 Contemporary Critical Issues
3.00 crs.

This is a special topics course focusing on different contemporary issues in literary criticism, such as environmental theory, new media, food studies, and post-humanism.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A487 Contemporary Critical Issues
3.00 crs.

This is a special topics course focusing on different contemporary issues in literary criticism, such as environmental theory, new media, food studies, and post-humanism.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PSYC A488 Senior Research
2.00 crs.

This course involves the preparation of a formal written proposal for an empirical research project and undergraduate thesis.

Advanced junior standing, Permission of instructor
PHIL A489 Major Seminar: Contemporary Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is a detailed study of an author or texts from the contemporary (19th and 20th Centuries) period.

PSYC A489 Senior Thesis
1.00 crs.

This course involves the completion of an empirical research project and writing of an undergraduate thesis.

Prerequisite
Permission of instructor
CHEM A490 Advanced Topics
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

ENGL A490 Great Figures
3.00 crs.

This special topics seminar is an intensive study of one or two influential literary figures. It traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and contemporary assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A490 Great Figures
3.00 crs.

This special topics seminar is an intensive study of one or two influential literary figures. It traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and contemporary assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
PHIL A490 Seminar: Ancient Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is a detailed study of an author or texts from the ancient period.

BIOL A491 Biology ETS Exam
0.00 crs.

Exit exam for Biological Sciences majors. 

ENGL A491 Practicum in Teaching Writing
1.00 crs.

This practicum focuses on methods and materials for teaching writing. Students work in the Writing across the Curriculum lab.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted, Permission of instructor
Corequisites:
ENGL A491 Practicum in Teaching Writing
1.00 crs.

This practicum focuses on methods and materials for teaching writing. Students work in the Writing across the Curriculum lab.

Any of the prerequisites are accepted, Permission of instructor
Corequisites:
PHIL A491 Seminar: Medieval Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is a detailed study of an author or texts from the medieval period.

PHIL A492 Seminar: Modern Philosophy
3.00 crs.

This course is a detailed study of an author or texts from the modern period. 

CHEM A493 Capstone Presentation
1.00 crs.

This course is designed to strengthen the student’s oral and writing skills in technical communication. A secondary objective is to practice skills retrieving data from the chemical literature in both written and electronic form. The course requires one paper and one oral presentation at the departmental seminar.

Prerequisite: CHEM A303CHEM A320, or permission of instructor

HIST A493 Directed Reading Course
3.00 crs.

The course content varies but is keyed to student and faculty interests in relevant professional topics.

MATH A493 Directed Readings
3.00 crs.

Course content varies and is keyed to the participants' interests in relevant professional topics.

ENGL A493 Directed Readings
3.00 crs.

Course content varies and is keyed to the participants' interests in relevant professional topics.

PHIL A493 Seminar: Major Author
3.00 crs.

This course is an in-depth analysis of the thought of a major philosopher. Content varies.

or permission of instructor
COSC A493 Special Topics in Computer Science
3.00 crs.

Students demonstrate the ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer sciences theory in the modeling and design of computer-based programming. Emphasis is on one or more of the theoretical aspects of computer science.

SPAN A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Work focusing on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

ENGL A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

PSYC A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Learning experiences are designed to meet the special needs of advanced majors. Content, activities, credit, and frequency of scheduling are variable.

Permission of Department Chair
SPCH A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or projective efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

MATH A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

RELS A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

PHIL A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

FREN A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor.

SOCI A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

Permission of instructor
COSC A495 Special Project in Computer Science
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. Students demonstrate the ability to use current skills and tools necessary for the application of computing practice.

PHYS A495 Special Projects IV
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.
LAS A495 Special Topics
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students work independently on a research paper or directed readings project under the supervision of a professor.

ENGL A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

MATH A496 Math Seminar
1.00 crs.

Topics from various branches of mathematics will be presented, discussed, and argued by the students. By invitation only.

PSYC A496 Seminar
3.00 crs.

Course content varies with each offering, but is keyed to student and faculty interest.

Permission of Department Chair
HIST A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

SPAN A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

SPCH A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

RELS A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course is comprised of a supervised group of students participating in a common effort and sharing the results of their research on a common topic.

PHIL A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

In a seminar, a supervised group of students share the results of their research on a common topic. In a workshop, a supervised group of students participate in a common effort.

FREN A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

SOCI A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

COSC A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort. Credits vary.

PHYS A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort. 

PSYC A497 Internship
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course involves supervised field experience in cooperation with New Orleans area agencies. On-campus meetings and written assignments are required.

Advanced junior standing, Permission of instructor
ENVA A497 Internship
3.00 crs.

Students gain practical experience in environmental fields by conducting service learning projects or volunteer work at some community, government, tourism, or non-government organization. It is expected that students complete at least 120 hours of service. Internships typically require an off-campus director that oversees day-to-day activities and an on-campus faculty sponsor that acts as the liaison between the student, director and the Environment program. Prior to undertaking an internship, a proposal must be submitted for approval through an Environment program faculty member.

CRIM A497 Internship
4.00 crs.

The Criminology internship is an academic course offered to qualified students who want an experiential learning opportunity. The Internship allows selected students to engage full-time in an approved work environment where they can apply their knowledge of criminology/criminal justice to the actual daily activities of a professional criminal justice agency.

SOCI A497 Internship
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Sociology majors and minors with a GPA of at least 2.75 may apply up to six credits of supervised internships or independent study courses toward their major or minor electives. No two internships shall be at the same site.

Junior, Must have completed 12 hours of sociology courses.
CHEM A497 Internship/ Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

PHYS A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. 

HIST A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

SPAN A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

POLS A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

ENGL A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

FOST A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is a supervised practical experience. A practicum is a supervised practical application of previously studied theory. 

SPCH A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

LAS A497 Internship/Practicum
3.00 crs.

The LAS internship is an experiential learning placement in a Latin American-related community project or institution that is approved and coordinated by LAS faculty.

FREN A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

COSC A497 Practicum/Internship II
3.00 crs.

This experience is planned and arranged in conjunction with the student's major advisor. Students gain practical computing experience on projects outside a regular classroom setting. 

ENVA A498 Independent Research
3.00 crs.

Students work with a faculty advisor to conduct theoretical, field, and/or laboratory research in some aspect of Environmental Science or Environmental Studies. Typically, this involves identifying an original question in an environmental topic, collecting and analyzing data, and preparing a written report of the findings. Prior to undertaking independent research, a proposal must be submitted for approval through an Environment program faculty member.

PHIL A498 Philosophy Honors Thesis
3.00 crs.

Students undertake a research project under the supervision of a professor that culminates in the writing of an undergraduate thesis.

CHEM A498 Research
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

All majors are encouraged to, and honors program students must, register for one to three credit hours for each semester starting with the second semester of their sophomore years for a total of four credit hours. Credit is prorated on the basis of one credit hour for four hours devoted to research.

Permission of Department Chair
FRSC A498 Research in Forensics
3.00 crs.

Students engage in supervised research in forensic science under the guidance of a Loyola faculty member. Students present a formal research proposal and upon approval complete the research within one semester. This will usually be the last course completed in the Forensic Science minor.

PHYS A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. 

HIST A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

ENGL A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

FOST A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on an empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. 

MATH A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

The research project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

SPCH A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

RELS A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

COSC A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Research projects focus on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. Credits vary.

PSYC A498 Research Project, credits vary
1.00 crs.

The research project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

Permission of Department Chair
SPAN A498 Senior Thesis
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis advisor.

FREN A498 Senior Thesis
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

CLHU A498 Thesis Research
3.00 crs.