Undergraduate

RELM 346 Catholic Social Teaching
3.00 crs.

This course examines the development of Catholic social teaching, its foundations in theology and ethics, its principles and key themes. It emphasizes the importance of action in partnership in response to the invitation of Catholic social teaching.

ENGL A100 Expository Writing
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to English composition that focuses on grammar, paragraph and essay structure, and critical reading skills. This course is for students who are not yet ready to take ENGL T122. Students are assigned to the course on the basis of a placement test administered by the English department. Students may not take ENGL A100 for degree credit after successful completion of ENGL T122.

NEUR A100 Fundamentals of Neuroscience
3.00 crs.

This course is an introductory survey of topics and methods in neuroscience and the connection between brain and behavior. Topics will include neuronal structure and function, neuroanatomy, sensory systems, learning and memory and brain-related disorders and diseases. Students will gain specific knowledge of the basic experimental methods used in the neurosciences.

SCIE A100 Introduction to the Sciences
1.00 crs.

This course is offered to students accepted into the Loyola summer Neuro Camp program. Students attend classes rotating in Biology, Computer Science, Physics, and Psychology. The focus is on how each discipline relates to neuroscience and includes lectures in conjunction with interactive lab activities. Each student is responsible for creating a research poster integrating what they have learned during the week and showcasing the poster to instructors and other observers. 

CHEM A102 Introduction to Organic & Biological Chemistry
3.00 crs.

This is a 3-credit survey course of general, organic and biological chemistry with an emphasis on applications to the human body. Topics discussed include scientific measurement, atomic theory and structure, bonding, quantitative relationships in chemicals reactions, gases, solutions, electrolytes, organic functional groups and nomenclature, organic reactions, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, metabolism, nucleic acids, radiation and nuclear medicine as it relates to nursing students. 

SPST A196 Online Adult Learning
3.00 crs.

This course is designed for Loyola online students to enable them to more fully understand the learning process in an online environment and to reflect on their own learning and educational journeys as adult learners. The online education experience comes as a culture shock to many students, hence the goal is to equip Loyola students with the knowledge, skills, and habits necessary to navigate their online academic experience successfully We will learn about theories of adult learning and development, growth mindset, and research-based strategies to be successful as an online learner. We will also discuss technical particularities of online education. You will be encouraged to reflect on how these theories apply to your own learning, academic, and personal goals. Readings will primarily come from fields of education and psychology. The course will also draw from Loyola's Jesuit identity through reflection, respect, and appreciation, aiming to enrich your educational experience at Loyola. 

EMS A205 Emergency Medical Response Planning
3.00 crs.

The course provides an analysis of the players involved; coordination with governmental emergency management; legal requirements; employee disaster awareness and preparedness; disaster mitigation and response; business resumption considerations and public policy considerations and community outreach. 

EMS A210 Emergency Medical Services Management
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the core functions of the emergency medical services (EMS) administrator and concepts associated with the administration of an EMS service. Areas of study include a broad overview of key elements including strategic planning, customer service, marketing, quality management, and data collection. Essential knowledge relevant to all aspects of the EMS profession is introduced, and assignments are provided to allow for application of these concepts.

COSC A241 Computing Ethics
3.00 crs.

This course mixes ethical theory with case study analysis to introduce students to ethics questions and theories that can help them to make ethically sound decisions in their professional, personal, and social experiences with computing. Starting with a few motivating current events, the course covers major ethical perspectives, and then introduces key ethical issues related to networked communications, intellectual property, information privacy, computer and network security, computer and software reliability, professional ethics, and workplace fairness, health, and the impacts of job automation.

COSC A242 Introduction to Cybersecurity
3.00 crs.

A broad survey course intended for undergraduate students in any major: Students are provided with a road map for approaching this field from multiple standpoints—computer science, business administration, criminal justice, or other disciplines. Students learn the mechanisms needed to ensure the fundamentals of information security. The course will present security for personal systems, enterprise systems, and internet use. Students learn to delineate the many different types of threats and vulnerabilities, and to characterize noteworthy recent failures in information security.

COSC A243 Corporate Cybersecurity Strategy
3.00 crs.

Cybersecurity is as much a set of human practices as technical ones. Responsible handling of information assets—let alone ethical handling—demands a consistent approach whether an organization is a transnational corporation or a sole proprietorship. This course teaches students to implement security policies to support organizational goals. We discuss methodologies for identifying, quantifying, mitigating, and controlling security risks, as well as disaster recovery. Student also learn about laws, regulations, and standards relating to information security and privacy, and how they affect IT organizations.

 

MATH A245 Calculus for Life Sciences
3.00 crs.

This course is designed for pre-health majors and will cover fundamentals of differential calculus along with applications whose primary motivation are biological. Topics will include limits, derivatives, population models, and exponential growth as it pertains to epidemiology. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze some basic discrete dynamical systems and understand how they arise in biological systems; utilize and interpret with allometric models; grasp the informal ideas of limits, continuity, and differentiation; employ techniques of differentiation (product, quotient, and chain rules); and use differentiation to solve optimization problems. 

Prerequisite requirements include successful completion of MATH A118 Pre-Calculus Mathematics with a grade of C- or better, or placement through ACT, SAT, or ALEKS exam scores.  

Completion of MATH A118 Pre-Calculus Math, Math Placement
COSC A270 Introduction to Relational Databases
3.00 crs.

This course introduces the concepts and terminology of databases. The concepts discussed during the lectures are illustrated by a number of hands-on exercises based on the Microsoft Access database software.

PHYS A295 Special Projects II
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course facilitates a wide range of options for study and outcomes. 

ENGL A306 Professional Writing
3.00 crs.

This course explores the art of generating texts in professional settings. This class focuses on the writing skills necessary to produce clear, concise, appropriate, and well organized writing on the job. We will be examining audience awareness, different document formats, and the impact of technology on writing practices. Throughout this eight-week course, we will work on harnessing your attention to detail, organizing documents, revising, and creating texts written towards your intended audience.

ENGL A306 Professional Writing
3.00 crs.

This course explores the art of generating texts in professional settings. This class focuses on the writing skills necessary to produce clear, concise, appropriate, and well organized writing on the job. We will be examining audience awareness, different document formats, and the impact of technology on writing practices. Throughout this eight-week course, we will work on harnessing your attention to detail, organizing documents, revising, and creating texts written towards your intended audience.

PSYC A311 Psychology and the Law
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the study of psychology's relevancy to the legal system. Through class discussion and critical thought, students analyze four main dilemmas: 1) The rights of individuals versus the common good, 2) equality versus discretion, 3) discovery of truth versus resolving conflicts, and 4) science versus the law as a source of decisions. Students are required to apply what they learn to their observations of a local trial or through a service-learning experience.

PSYC A314 Health Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the relationship between psychological theory, principles, and methods and the assessment, prevention, maintenance, and restoration of physical health. Doctor-patient relationships and their impact on health are also considered.

and one additional PSYCA***, or permission of instructor
PSYC A318 Psychology of Sexuality
3.00 crs.

A survey of human sexuality from a psychological perspective: Focusing primarily on psychological theory and research, students gain an understanding of how the psychology of sexuality is impacted by biological, sociological, philosophical, spiritual, and legal perspectives. Students also develop a greater awareness of the role of sexuality in their lives and the lives of others. Topics include sexual development, sexual behaviors, sexual disorders, sex therapy, gender & transgender issues, as well as fetishes and paraphilias.

and one additional PSYCA***
CRIM A325 Sex Offenses and Offenders
3.00 crs.

This course is a comprehensive overview of psychological, sociological and legal issues related to sex offenses. Additionally, the sexual offenses and different typologies of the sex offenders are discussed.

ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the modern European novel. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction.)

Sophomore
ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the modern European novel. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction.)

Sophomore
COSC A341 Ethical Hacking - Penetration Testing
3.00 crs.

This course is a hands-on lab in “ethical hacking” and other forms of penetration testing for the purpose of finding and resolving vulnerabilities in computer systems and networks.  The course is founded on absorbing the Mitre ATT&CK framework as a means of understanding adversarial behavior.  Students perform penetration tests on specially configured target systems, which may include externally-managed cyber-ranges. Students also participate in bug bounties, and learn how to articulate and practice responsible disclosure of cybersecurity vulnerabilities.  Upon completion, students will be prepared for the Certified Ethical Hacker qualification test.

BIOL A341 Plant Science
3.00 crs.

An introduction to applied botany emphasizing the biology and utilization of cultivated plants. The lecture
will examine the structure and function of plants and explore the relationships between plants, people,
agriculture, and the environment. The laboratory will emphasize economic botany and introduce students to
basic horticultural techniques in the context of independent research projects.

COSC A342 Digital Forensics
3.00 crs.

The increasing dependence in everyday life on computer information systems has led to a corresponding increase in criminal activity through and against such systems. In addition, benign use of information systems has grown to the extent that such systems are now routinely part of discovery in civil and criminal legal proceedings. In this course, students will learn the techniques of digital forensics that are used to investigate cybersecurity incidents, legal disputes, and crimes. We will develop approaches that can be used on desktop personal computers and servers. The course will also emphasize the importance of controls and verification of digital evidence and the critical necessity of preserving and documenting a chain of custody for that evidence.

BIOL A342 Plant Science Lab
1.00 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A341.  Lab fee $100.

Corequisites:
PSYC A347 Psychology of Sport and Exercise
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to theory, research, and applied in the field of sport and exercise psychology. The focus is on psychological factors that affect participation, involvement, and performance in sport and exercise.

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

BIOL A363 Virology
3.00 crs.

Virology actively engages students in the studies and principles of human and animal molecular virology. Topics include replication, methods of diagnosis and detection, epidemiology, current use of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, persistent infections, emerging viruses and use of scientific literature. 

COSC A365 Operating Systems
3.00 crs.

Topics include an introduction to operating systems; process, memory, and storage management; protection and security; distributed systems; and case studies.

Prerequisite
Sophomore
CHEM A375 Fundamentals of Biochemistry
3.00 crs.

Fundamentals of Biochemistry is a one-semester course covering underlying theoretical principles and biologically important processes in the field of biochemistry. The course covers the following topics: biological synthesis, structure, and function of proteins and nucleic acids; quantitative enzymology; the molecular basis and regulation of biologically important pathways (such as glycolysis and lipid metabolism); and other selected topics (at the discretion of the instructor). A strong emphasis is placed on the understanding and interpretation of biochemical methods and on engagement with the scientific literature.

PHYS A395 Special Projects III
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course facilitates a wide range of options for study and outcomes. 

COSC A406 Machine Learning
3.00 crs.

Machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. Topics include effective machine learning techniques, implementation, and the theoretical underpinnings of learning and AI.

Sophomore
PSYC A422 Cognitive Neuroscience
3.00 crs.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the cognitive processes underlying human behavior, their experimental origins, and their theoretical significance.

PSYC A423 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A422.  Lab fee $50.

PSYC A423 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A422.  Lab fee $50.

PSYC A423 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A422.  Lab fee $50.

COSC A426 Game Programming
3.00 crs.

This course is for individuals interested in becoming a game programmer, game designer, or game artist. Students learn how to make video games using the industry tools and practices of game development. The course takes students from intermediate programmers to designers of stunning 3D games. By the end of the course, students will have completed multiple hands-on projects and will be able to leverage an array of game development techniques to design and create their own video games.

PSYC A428 Psychology of Learning
3.00 crs.

This course is an examination of contemporary theories and problems of learning.

PSYC A429 Animal Operant Lab
1.00 crs.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in the operant conditioning of the laboratory rat. It is an obligatory optional lab to accompany PSYC A428. Lab fee $75.

COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
3.00 crs.

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
3.00 crs.

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
3.00 crs.

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

PSYC A459 Naturalistic Observation Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory course addresses the ways that behavioral data can be obtained through systematic, unbiased, naturalistic observations. Topics include sources of bias, scheduling observations, ethograms, and sampling techniques.

or permission of instructor
PSYC A459 Naturalistic Observation Lab
1.00 crs.

This laboratory course addresses the ways that behavioral data can be obtained through systematic, unbiased, naturalistic observations. Topics include sources of bias, scheduling observations, ethograms, and sampling techniques.

or permission of instructor
PSYC A470 History and Systems of Psychology
3.00 crs.

This course for majors addresses those historical antecedents to contemporary psychology as well as the several systems or schools of psychology that have given direction to the discipline.

CHEM A486 Chemistry Seminar for Majors
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. 

PSYC A488 Senior Research
2.00 crs.

This course involves the preparation of a formal written proposal for an empirical research project and undergraduate thesis.

Advanced junior standing, Permission of instructor
CHEM A490 Advanced Topics
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

BIOL A491 Biology ETS Exam
0.00 crs.

Exit exam for Biological Sciences majors. 

CMMN A493 Internship II
3.00 crs.

This is a second or third internship with supervised practical experience. May be repeated for credit when workplace varies

Prerequisite
MATH A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

SPCH A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or projective efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

PSYC A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Learning experiences are designed to meet the special needs of advanced majors. Content, activities, credit, and frequency of scheduling are variable.

Permission of Department Chair
CMMN A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research. A formal proposal is required in which the student clearly sets forth what he/she proposes to do. A reminder: the average three-hour course is supposed to account for 145 hours over the semester.

 

Special arrangements required
RELS A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

FREN A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor.

PHIL A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

SOCI A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

Permission of instructor
SPAN A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Work focusing on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

ENGL A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

PHYS A495 Special Projects IV
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.
LAS A495 Special Topics
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students work independently on a research paper or directed readings project under the supervision of a professor.

ENGL A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

PSYC A496 Seminar
3.00 crs.

Course content varies with each offering, but is keyed to student and faculty interest.

Permission of Department Chair
SPAN A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

SPCH A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

CMMN A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

Special arrangements required
RELS A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course is comprised of a supervised group of students participating in a common effort and sharing the results of their research on a common topic.

FREN A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

PHIL A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

In a seminar, a supervised group of students share the results of their research on a common topic. In a workshop, a supervised group of students participate in a common effort.

SOCI A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

COSC A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort. Credits vary.

HIST A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

PHYS A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort. 

PSYC A497 Internship
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course involves supervised field experience in cooperation with New Orleans area agencies. On-campus meetings and written assignments are required.

Advanced junior standing, Permission of instructor
CMMN A497 Internship
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience.

Special arrangements required
SOCI A497 Internship
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Sociology majors and minors with a GPA of at least 2.75 may apply up to six credits of supervised internships or independent study courses toward their major or minor electives. No two internships shall be at the same site.

Junior, Must have completed 12 hours of sociology courses.
CHEM A497 Internship/ Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

SPAN A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

ENGL A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

POLS A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

FOST A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is a supervised practical experience. A practicum is a supervised practical application of previously studied theory. 

SPCH A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

FREN A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

HIST A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

PHYS A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. 

CHEM A498 Research
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

All majors are encouraged to, and honors program students must, register for one to three credit hours for each semester starting with the second semester of their sophomore years for a total of four credit hours. Credit is prorated on the basis of one credit hour for four hours devoted to research.

Permission of Department Chair
PHYS A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. 

ENGL A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

MATH A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

The research project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

FOST A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on an empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. 

SPCH A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

RELS A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

CMMN A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. A formal proposal is required in which the student clearly sets forth what he/she proposes to do. A reminder: the average three-hour course is supposed to account for 145 hours over the semester.

Special arrangements required
COSC A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Research projects focus on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. Credits vary.

HIST A498 Research Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

PSYC A498 Research Project, credits vary
1.00 crs.

The research project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

Permission of Department Chair
SPAN A498 Senior Thesis
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis advisor.

FREN A498 Senior Thesis
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

HIST A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

PHYS A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

LAS A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Work done independently under professorial supervision.

SPAN A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Work done independently under professorial supervision.

POLS A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course includes work done independently under professorial supervision.

ENGL A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course includes work leading to the English Honors thesis or the University Honors senior thesis, as well as work done independently under professorial supervision.

CHEM A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Permission of Department Chair
MATH A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision.

FOST A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

SPCH A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.
PHIL A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

RELS A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

FREN A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An opportunity to work independently under professorial supervision.

CMMN A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A formal proposal is required in which the student clearly sets forth what he/she proposes to do. A reminder: the average three-hour course is supposed to account for 145 hours over the semester.

Special arrangements required
GREK A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

SOCI A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Sociology majors and minors with a GPA of at least 2.75 may apply up to six credits of supervised internships or independent study courses toward their major or minor electives. No two internships shall be at the same site.

COSC A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students work with a faculty member on a topic of their choosing. Credits vary.

BIOL A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

PSYC A499 Independent Study, credits vary
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Permission of Department Chair
CLHU A499 Thesis or Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students who have satisfactorily completed their research register for this course while they write their honors thesis. This course may also be used to perform independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite
Prerequisite is for thesis only
MGT B455 Strategic Brand Management
3.00 crs.

This course explores the importance of brands and the process of branding as a vital element of the success of businesses and other organizations. This course is designed to develop student’s ability to build, measure, and manage brand equity through effective and strategic brand promotion. Projects include an audit of a real company’s branding strategy and brand promotion campaigns.

Junior
MGT B455 Strategic Brand Management
3.00 crs.

This course explores the importance of brands and the process of branding as a vital element of the success of businesses and other organizations. This course is designed to develop student’s ability to build, measure, and manage brand equity through effective and strategic brand promotion. Projects include an audit of a real company’s branding strategy and brand promotion campaigns.

Junior
BA B493 Special Topics
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Accounting offered on an irregular basis.

Junior
NEUR G493 Directed Readings Capstone
3.00 crs.

Each graduating student must complete research in neuroscience as a Capstone. The capstone may be completed as an independent study, directed readings, or an internship.

NEUR G497 Internship/Practicum Capstone
3.00 crs.

Each graduating student must complete research in neuroscience as a Capstone. The capstone may be completed as an independent study, directed readings, or an internship.

NEUR G499 Independent Study Capstone
3.00 crs.

Each graduating student must complete research in neuroscience as a Capstone. The capstone may be completed as an independent study, directed readings, or an internship.

NURS G955 Informatics & Finance
3.00 crs.

This course examines the essential knowledge needed to understand information systems and technologies that are transforming health care. The student gains the ability to improve information literacy acquisition skills, critique informatics program proposals, understand the role of the informatics specialist in managing health care information for decision-making and program planning, and analyze the utility and functionality of technology. Students will explore financial and business principles, as sources of information, which are used to make health care decisions.

NURS G800 is for PB students
MUPR M121 - M150 Applied Study
1.00 crs., 2.00 crs.

This course is a concentrated study of voice or a string, woodwind, brass, percussion, or keyboard instrument at the lower division level. Creditable as needed.

Music majors and minors only
THEA M300 Play Production
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course involves the production of one full-length play and includes work on make-up, costuming, lighting, acting, directing, set design, and construction. Usually taken for one credit per assignment. May be taken more than once.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

MUPR M321 - M350 Applied Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation of individual applied study at the upper division levels. Creditable as needed.

Music majors and minors only
THEA M417 Playwriting Workshop
3.00 crs.

Analysis of linear and nonlinear plays for an appreciation of principles operative in both. Student is expected to complete at least one one-act play or the first draft of a full-length play. Open to all students (THEA M107 The Dramatic Imagination is a prerequisite for Theatre Arts majors only). 

THEA M417 Playwriting Workshop
3.00 crs.

Analysis of linear and nonlinear plays for an appreciation of principles operative in both. Student is expected to complete at least one one-act play or the first draft of a full-length play. Open to all students (THEA M107 The Dramatic Imagination is a prerequisite for Theatre Arts majors only). 

THEA M497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience at an approved professional theatre. A practicum is a supervised practical application of previously studied theory within the Loyola University Theatre play season.

Permission of Department Chair
MUGN M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A student may apply for an independent study only in the following two cases: the student needs a course for graduation which is not presently being offered, or the student desires to study a topic(s) not covered in courses offered by the college. In general, students applying for independent study should possess at least junior standing. Exceptions must be discussed with and approved by the associate dean. Students must also complete a formal application prior to registration and obtain approval from the desired tenured instructor and the associate dean. 

Overall GPA of 2.0, Junior
MUED M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

With permission of an instructor and approval of the Music Education Chair, the student may pursue in-depth *study* of a subject area related to the student’s area of interest and/or music education concentration.  The student, in consultation with the instructor, must outline the course plan of study in advance of university course registration. The written description should indicate the purpose and objective(s) of the independent study, preliminary list of relevant readings, and final product and/or outcome(s) of the course.

MUIN M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A student may apply for an independent study only in the following two cases: the student needs a course for graduation which is not presently being offered, or the student desires to study a topic(s) not covered in courses offered by the college. In general, students applying for independent study should possess at least junior standing. Exceptions must be discussed with and approved by the associate dean. Students must also complete a formal application prior to registration and obtain approval from the desired tenured instructor and the associate dean.

Junior, Overall GPA of 2.0
MUHL M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course is arranged in consultation and with permission from the student's major advisor. 

MUJZ M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course is arranged with permission and approval of the student's major advisor. 

THEA M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Independent study offers flexibility to meet individual student needs, interests, and styles of learning. They are a way for students to learn specialized material or gain research experience. Independent studies provide students opportunities to explore their interests in greater depth, and make important decisions about how and where they will direct their talents in the future.  An agreement between student and the professor serving as Project Director is require with exact requirements stating the goal, assignments, grading criteria and timeline.  In general, students applying for independent study should possess at least junior standing.

Permission of Department Chair
MUPD M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course is arranged in consultation with and permission from the student's major advisor. 

MUTH M499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A student may apply for an independent study only in the following two cases: the student needs a course for graduation which is not presently being offered, or the student desires to study a topic(s) not covered in courses offered by the college. In general, students applying for independent study should possess at least junior standing. Exceptions must be discussed with and approved by the associate dean. Students must also complete a formal application prior to registration and obtain approval from the desired tenured instructor and the associate dean. 

Overall GPA of 2.0, Junior
LAS N205 Latinx Experience Through Literature
3.00 crs.

This course introduces students to the field of Latinx Studies in order to better understand the place of the Latinx experience in U.S. politics, history, and culture (including in New Orleans) through literature. Students will be asked to examine how a heterogeneous and changing Latinx population both shapes and is shaped by life in the United States. A selection of cultural productions (comics, essays, poems, novels, short stories, podcasts, documentaries, theory, murals, films) will inform our class discussions. Over the course of the semester, we will also engage with scholarly conversations about constructions of “Latinidad” as they relate to questions of identity, class, race and/or ethnicity, religion, gender and sexuality, (im)migration, language, and popular culture. Students will learn to recognize and appreciate the complexities of Latinx experiences in the U.S. and will become familiar with a critical vocabulary that will facilitate critical thinking and complex discussions about broader issues of American culture and identity. Students are encouraged to share their own personal experiences, should they identify as Latinx.

CLHU O204 Feasting and Dining in Antiquity
3.00 crs.

Loyola Core: Creative Arts & Cultures

What we eat and how we eat it help to define us in terms of social class/caste, religion, ethnicity, and even gender.  In this class, we will explore food as both sustenance and symbol.  The ancient Greeks and Romans were very aware of the power of food and dining.  Across the term, we will look at their “food issues” as well as our own.

ENGL O206 Deconstructing Superheroes
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

Superhero stories appeal to us because they work through relevant concepts, such as identity, morality, power, and citizenship. These stories explore meaningful questions: What does it mean to be good? What is the nature of evil, and how is it vanquished? What balance should we strike between personal freedom and group security? We will investigate the ways in which specific superheroes have taken up these and other social questions, and we will study the superhero's flip side, the super villain.

ENGL O206 Deconstructing Superheroes
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

Superhero stories appeal to us because they work through relevant concepts, such as identity, morality, power, and citizenship. These stories explore meaningful questions: What does it mean to be good? What is the nature of evil, and how is it vanquished? What balance should we strike between personal freedom and group security? We will investigate the ways in which specific superheroes have taken up these and other social questions, and we will study the superhero's flip side, the super villain.

CLHU O210 Classics and Comics
3.00 crs.

The trend of reception studies in Classical scholarship is more popular than ever. In this course, the student will examine the use of characters, themes, and literary genres from the ancient world and their appearance in comic books, graphic novels, and cartoons. Students will work to gain a good understanding of both primary source material covering topics that include hero myths from around the world, ancient philosophy, Greek history, Roman comedy, Homeric and Babylonian epics, Greek vases.

Loyola Core: Creative Arts & Cultures

CLHU O215 Greek & Roman Art & Archaeology
3.00 crs.

This class will survey the art, monuments, and culture of the Greeks and Romans from the Bronze Age to the reign of Constantine the Great.  Over the course of the semester, the student will learn the general chronology of Greek and Roman history and become familiar with art historical and archaeological terminology, along with Graeco-Roman sculpture, painting, pottery, architecture, and minor arts. 

CLHU O220 Ancient Egyptian Culture
3.00 crs.

Ancient Egyptian Culture is a survey of Egyptian culture with an emphasis on the arts (sacred writing, painting, literature, monuments, etc.). Moving from pre-dynastic Egypt through to the Roman Conquest and into the modern world, we will keep track of historical/cultural developments and look at how the Egyptians expressed their vision of themselves and their evolving society through their creative output. 

FREN O220 Culture of Fashion
3.00 crs.

This lecture-style, eight-week, asynchronous online course will increase students' insight into the dynamic and culture of fashion through the interdisciplinary analysis of past and present major economic, social, political, historical, and cultural issues, as featured in the French fashion industry. A creative midterm project and final research paper will also enhance students' critical, analytical, and writing skills.

CLHU O246 Greek Mythology
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Culture 

This course is a study of the origins, themes, and significance of Greek Mythology with emphasis on myth as a vestige of primitive thought and on the corpus of Greek myths as a source for Greek and Roman literature. 

LAS O260 Cultural Voyages of Virgin Mary
3.00 crs.

The class offers a historic overview of the representation of the Virgin Mary in European and Latin American culture (including Latinx and Chicana culture in the US) from a feminist perspective, considering how images of and texts regarding Mary have been used by the Church and others to frame particular perspectives on gender, societal roles and values, and power dynamics.

HIST Q247 Empires of the Modern Pacific
3.00 crs.

Knowledge & Values: History II

Empires of the Pacific incorporates the voices of marginalized and/or non-Western peoples, thus enabling students to become familiar with the relationships between the colonizers and the colonized, broadly construed. The course, firmly rooted in a transnational approach to historical understanding, features examples and scholarship about 19th and 20th century imperialisms in Asia, focusing on the British, Japanese, French, and American Empires in the Pacific and Southeast Asia.

 

HIST Q250 1960s in US and Europe
3.00 crs.

Knowledge & Values: History II

Key elements of our culture -- its patterns of consumption, its youth culture, and its sexual and social identities -- were forged in the sixties. Some look back with nostalgia on the utopian politics, the counterculture and the mass movements of that period. Others see the 1960s as the beginning of everything wrong with our contemporary society. In this module we examine the transnational protest movements and social trends that made the 1960s a cultural revolution in North America and Europe.

 

HIST Q267 Queer History and Culture
3.00 crs.

The starting point is that sexuality and gender identity has a history. The module explores the importance of race, class, gender on sexual identities and to emphasize that sexuality not only has a history but multiple histories. Sexual categories whose meanings may seem to be self-evident and unchanging: straight and gay, homosexual and heterosexual, transgender and cisgender, "normal" and "deviant," for example.

PHYS T121 Energy and the Environment
3.00 crs.

Foundation Courses: First Year Seminar

This course will be an introduction to many important aspects of energy. What it is, how it is produced and consumed, the ways in which it impacts society and the environment. Topics will include climate change, fossil fuels, energy storage, energy usage in transportation and in our homes, and alternative energy sources such as nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and waves.

FREN T121 Global French Cultures
3.00 crs.

This first-year seminar aims to highlight the relevance of the liberal arts for understanding and intervening in some of the most urgent problems of our time. It will examine important contemporary crises across the French-speaking world, including the migrant crisis, the environmental crisis, the "me too" movement, the economic crisis, systemic racism, and Achille Mbembe's "exit from democracy."

HIST T235 Roman and Viking Invasions
3.00 crs.

Knowledge & Values: History I

This course seeks to understand the development of cultural identity, royal power and law in Britain through the medium of invasion. By examining the invasions of the cosmopolitan Romans, the Germanic Saxons and the Scandinavian Vikings, students will seek to understand how various global influences shaped British identity, encouraged the expansion of royal authority, and sparked the formation of modern jurisprudence in medieval Britain.

 

RELS V224 Interfaith Relations
3.00 crs.

This course is intended for students to discuss and address practical issues pertaining to Interfaith Relations in the contemporary world.  Its aim is for students to study Interfaith Relations and learn about how Interfaith Relations can be improved, whether by aiding in conflict resolution, developing outreach strategies for more cohesive communities, or re-conceptualizing ideas collectively in ways that work for a particular real-world situation.

RELS V262 New Religions and Media
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: World Religions

The student will learn to analyze new and alternative religions (pejoratively called “cults”) and media sources of information about them. The student will learn to recognize the sociological and faith factors that produce new religious movements. Examples of members of new religious movements’ use of media; depictions of unconventional religions in news stories, documentaries and other media productions; the motivating factors for government and media depictions of religious movements as “cults”; as well as new religions scholars’ use of media will be analyzed.

 

SOCI X230 Sociology of Popular Culture
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

What is culture? What is popular culture? Why is popular culture popular? How is it produced? How is it consumed? What does it say about us? How can we study it? Does it matter? This class analyzes popular culture from a sociological perspective. We will learn the major sociological theoretical approaches, and we will use them to study popular cultural objects such as films, music, fashion, sports, advertisements, memes, and so forth

POLS X248 Killing Democracy
3.00 crs.

This course will utilize and critically evaluate a variety of political, historical, and legal perspectives to understand the basic tenets of constitutional democracy, the most prominent threats to American constitutional democracy, and leading proposals for dealing with these threats.

Loyola Core - Social Sciences

SOCI X262 Medical Sociology
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

This course analyzes health and illness from a sociological perspective. Sociologists systematically observe social life and search for empirical patterns in how it is shaped by people, groups, institutions, beliefs, and so forth. Medical sociologists use sociological theories and methods to investigate life, death, health, disease, and healing

POLS X266 International Justice
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

This course examines the phenomenon of intra-national conflicts (civil wars), organized crimes against humanity, and the responses of international community for international justice.

 

CRIM X282 Gangs and Criminal Networks
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

This course explores the extent of gang proliferation in the U.S. and abroad. Emphasis is on the dynamics of gang membership and the interactive social network relationship between gangs and the rest of society. Many variations of gangs and gang-like groups are discussed as well as individual, community, and criminological approaches for addressing gangs.

 

SOCI X320 Violence and Democracy
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

This course provides a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the complexities, controversies, and issues surrounding two major social problems facing humanity: violence and human rights violations. Resting on the premise that the concepts of violence and human rights are not unrelated, this course not only examines the relationship between violence and human rights, but also engenders the idea that greater commitment to human rights is the most effective antidote to violence.

BIOL Y210 Biology Through Art
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course covers the scientific method, and the basics of experiment design. This course integrates biology and art through the creation of artworks. Students view microorganisms, see examples of using DNA as an artistic medium, and see anatomy as art. The course culminates in students creating their own biological self-portrait. With biotechnology becoming a greater part of our daily lives, there seems to be a movement in the art world to integrate art and science.

CHEM Y235 Beer Brewing
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

Beer Brewing is an intense hands-on course teaching the science of brewing beer. It is open to students 21-years-old and up. Beer Brewing will introduce you to the cultural, historical, economic and bio-chemical underpinnings of beer and the beer-brewing process. The course touches on botany, chemistry and microbiology, as well as societal and cultural history of beer and the processes involved in making beer. Lab fee $60
 

PHYS Y236 Paris Discoveries
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

The course begins with the history and fundamental ideas behind the international system of units known as the metric system. The course then explores the work of French astronomer Urbain Le Verrier whose observations confirmed the ideas of Newton, but then went on to pave the way for the dramatic discoveries of Einstein. The contributions of Marie Curie are then investigated. Her work on radioactivity set the foundation for the revolution in our understanding of matter that began in the early 20th century.

 

Any college level math