French

FREN A100 First-year French I
3.00 crs.

This course focuses on the fundamental structure of the french language. Development of the four basic skills - listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing - are of primary concern.

FREN A101 First-year French II
3.00 crs.

This course is a continuation in appropriation of the four basic skills with emphasis on correct pronunciation and the acquisition of fundamental vocabulary.

or placement
FREN A200 Second-year French I
3.00 crs.

Development of basic language skills continues with emphasis on grammar and the acquisition and use of new vocabulary in cultural contexts. Reading and discussion of articles and other writings are undertaken with grammatical exercises and short compositions based on cultural topics.

or placement
FREN A201 Second-year French II
3.00 crs.

This course consists of readings and discussion in French of literary and cultural texts. Students write short essays based on the readings and demonstrate use of basic techniques of textual analysis through discussion and in writing.

or placement
FREN A300 Advanced Grammar and Composition
3.00 crs.

This course reviews intensively the structure of the language and of idiomatic expressions. Daily translations and frequent original compositions are required.

or placement
FREN A301 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics
3.00 crs.

In this course, students acquire an extensive working vocabulary and fluency through conversation, reading, and discussion of cultural texts. French phonetics and its application to the improvement of pronunciation are also studied.

or placement
FREN A315 Analysis of French Texts
3.00 crs.

This course discusses specific techniques of intensive reading and analysis through an in-depth study of a variety of short texts in French chosen to represent various discourse styles, periods, genres, themes, and traditions from both French and Francophone cultural milieux. Special emphasis is on training students in the commentaire or explication de texte.

or placement
FREN A320 Culture and Civilization I
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to French civilization from Lascaux and Gallo-Roman times to the 18th century. It includes the study of the geography of the French hexagon, from the centrality of Paris to the regionalism of the provinces. Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque art and music are discussed.

or placement
FREN A321 Culture and Civilization II
3.00 crs.

This course is a study of the important historical, social and economic events beginning with the Revolution of 1789 to  the present. The nature and development of French aesthetics and artistic traditions in painting, sculpture, and music will be presented, along with current topics including education, and the politics of modern-day France.

or placement
FREN A325 La Nouvelle-Orleans
3.00 crs.

This course examines the French heritage of New Orleans, and explores the French side of our history, institutions, architecture, language, food, and celebrations. The assignments and discussions help students know and appreciate the cultural uniqueness and rich heritage of the city in which they live and study.

or placement
FREN A330 Introduction to French Literature I
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major literary currents and principal authors from the Middle Ages through the 17th century.

or placement
FREN A331 Introduction to French Literature II
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of the major literary currents and principal authors of the 19th and 20th centuries.

or equivalent
FREN A351 Enlightenment and Pre-Romanticism
3.00 crs.

Major trends and ideas in 18th-century literature are examined. Emphasis is on the works of the philosophies and on the development of the novel.

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A352 19th-century Prose
3.00 crs.

This course involves readings in French theory and in the novels of Balzac, Flaubert, Sand, Stendhal, and Zola. 

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A353 20th-century Prose
3.00 crs.

This course involves readings in French theory and in the works of Bernanos, Butor, Camus, Gide, Malraux, Proust, and Sartre. 

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A354 Introduction to French Poetry
3.00 crs.

This course centers on the reading and analysis of poems reflecting the major currents in French poetry from Lamartine, Baudelaire, and Mallarmé to the more recent works of Perse and Ponge.

At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A355 Introduction to French Theatre
3.00 crs.

This course is a chronological view of the development of French drama from its origins to the 20th century offering students an intensive study of representative dramatists and elements of the theatre.

or equivalent
FREN A360 Femmes de France
3.00 crs.

This course is a cross-disciplinary advanced French course that provides a detailed account of the most influential French women from various disciplines who helped shape the French identity. We will study the accomplishments of Jean d'Arc, Catherine de Medicis, Marie-Antoinette, Marie Curie, Gabrielle Chanel, Simone de Beauvoir, and others. In class we will also examine French feminism as opposed to its American counterpart, gain better understanding of gender roles in French society, and question the relevance of the representations of women in the media, literature, and the arts. 

or equivalent level through placement
FREN A361 French Chanson
3.00 crs.

This course is a survey of French vocal music from the troubadour tradition of the Middle Ages to the realistic tones of Edith Pilaf to the electronic vibes of Daft Punk and modern-day rap and rai. Students examine how singing has always been a part of the French art de vivre and political scene and has reflected major changes in society. Although students gain insight into all genre and eras, as well as the specifics of the French music industry, special focus will be given to Bell Epoque cabaret music, 20th century drinking songs, WWI and WWI military songs, "chansons realists," and Francophone performers such as Josephine Baker, Jacques Brel, Celine Dion, Cheb Khaled, and Stromae, who have helped French-singing repertoire reach out to global listeners. 

or equivalent level through placement
FREN A362 French Fashion
3.00 crs.

Using scholarly and magazine articles, advertisements, commercials, interviews, and films, this course explores the evolution of French fashion from the strict sartorial laws of the Middle Ages to the recent scandals around Dior's firing of former head designer John Galliano. Students will be introduced to the connections between the historical background and the emergence of trends and to the ethical challenges the globalized economy poses to large groups such as LVMH. The course offers a plunge into what makes French fashion unique - pret-a-porter, haute-couture, and craftmanship- and it provides insight into legendary designers such as Chanel, Dior, St. Laurent, and Gaultier. 

or equivalent level through placement
FREN A364 Food and the French
3.00 crs.

In this course, students explore the role and importance of food in French history, society, the media, and the arts. We will look at a variety of sources: cookbooks, newspapers, novels, movies, and writings by Claude Levi-Strauss and some French sociologists. Students investigate the material, and study of French food will serve as a context to review French grammar, vocabulary, and composition skills. We will also cook and eat from time to time.

or equivalent level through placement
FREN A365 Paris and the Arts
3.00 crs.

For centuries, Paris has been an inspiration and home to artists, writers, and performers, and a place where artistic expression is central to everyday life. This course looks at the art and its cultural context over a broad period of time. Students study great works of art and architecture, and read literary excerpts that help define the intellectual and cultural context of each time period. Course work surveys the French art world, briefly for the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 17th and 18th centuries, and in more detail for the 19th and 20th centuries. As the occasion arises, other forms of artistry may have a place in this course, including the culinary arts, cinema, and music. 

or equivalent level through placement
FREN A480 Capstone
1.00 crs.

Capstone course required of all majors. Student work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor. Capstone work should reflect the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a Languages and Cultures major.

FREN A495 Special Project
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

Students work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor.

FREN A496 Seminar/Workshop
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

FREN A497 Internship/Practicum
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

FREN A498 Senior Thesis
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

FREN A499 Independent Study
1.00 crs., 3.00 crs.

An opportunity to work independently under professorial supervision.

FREN O263 French and Francophone Cinema
3.00 crs.

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Culture 

French & Francophone Cinema introduces participants to the major past and contemporary film productions of the French-speaking world, with a specific emphasis on France, Belgium, Quebec, and Senegal. Weekly links to interviews with filmmakers or actors, articles and reviews, help students identify tropes in genres, themes, styles, and methods of distribution and financing. Each week students watch emblematic film(s) for each genre/era as a means to interpret signs and symbols.

FREN T121 First-Year Seminar
3.00 crs.

Foundation Courses: First-Year Seminar

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. First-Year Seminars at Loyola are small, discussion-based seminars that introduce new college students to academic inquiry at the university level by investigating a relevant topic. Specially-trained faculty lead these seminars in a way that instills in students the academic skills necessary to become successful Loyola students. Course titles may differ from section to section based on the instructor's focus for the course.