Art History

ARTH M300 Art After Modernism
3.00 crs.

Art after Modernism traces the development of art in the U.S. and Europe, following a rough chronology from the end of the Second World War through the present. This course covers the major movements with which artists of the last half-century have been associated (including Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, and Conceptual art) and explores the critical and theoretical terms with which this art has been discussed. 

Prerequisite
or permission of instructor, Required of all art majors
ARTH M350 Aesthetics: As Practiced in Theory
3.00 crs.

This course explores some of the major intellectual currents that have shaped art criticism, as well as artistic practice, over much of the previous century. Selected readings cover a variety of theoretical approaches to aesthetics, ranging from formalist criticism and social history to psychoanalysis and feminist criticism. In addition to participating in discussions of weekly assigned readings, students write and present a research paper on a topic of their choosing.

May be waived for non-VISA students with permission of instructor.
ARTH M496 Seminar/Workshop
3.00 crs.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

ARTH M497 Internship/Practicum
3.00 crs.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

ARTH M499 Independent Study
3.00 crs.

Independent work done under professorial supervision.

ARTH O160 Introduction to Art History I
3.00 crs.

This course is an introduction to the history of (primarily) Western art from prehistory through the Late Medieval period in Europe and the Mediterranean. Organized chronologically, it nevertheless takes a thematic approach to the production of material culture over time, focusing attention on such decisive factors as power, gender, patronage, iconography, etc. Always concerned with context as well as questions of form or style, readings, lectures, discussions, and writing assignments highlight the various social, political, and religious functions of art within Western cultures, while also examining specific techniques and practices developed and deployed by artists.

Required of all art and design majors., Open to all students
ARTH O162 Introduction to Art History II
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course is designed to follow ARTH O160 Intro to Art History I and provides an introduction to the history of Western art from the Early Renaissance period to the modern period. Organized chronologically, it nevertheless takes a thematic approach to the production of material culture over time, focusing attention on such decisive factors as power, gender, patronage, iconography, etc. Always concerned with context as well as questions of form or style, readings, lectures, discussions, and writing assignments highlight the various social, political, and religious functions of art within Western cultures, while also examining specific techniques and practices developed and deployed by artists.

Required of all art and design majors., Open to all students
ARTH O206 Music & Art in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course will examine intersections between music and the visual arts during the middle ages and the early modern period, focusing on selected cultural moments such as the court of Charlemagne c. 800, the cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris c. 1200, and Florence in the fifteenth centuries.

ARTH O215 Modern Art
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

Modern Art traces the development of modernism in Western art, following a rough chronology from the late nineteenth century in Europe to the end of the Second World War in Europe and the United States. This course covers the major stylistic movements with which modern artists have been associated (including Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism) and explores the critical and theoretical terms with which this art has been discussed.

Required of all art and design majors., Open to all students
ARTH O220 Medieval Art
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course is a survey of medieval art and visual culture, primarily in the West and in Islamic lands, ca. AD 300-1400. Major media considered include architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination, wall and panel painting, and luxury arts, with an emphasis on the production and use of objects and structures in cultural context.

ARTH O236 Women in Art
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course will present the role and image of women in visual arts as portrayed by men and women, from antiquity to the present, in the light of sociopolitical, cultural, and moral conditions and values. The work of women artists will be central.

ARTH O243 Art and History of the Book
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course is an overview of the history of the book as a cataloging device for information and as a work of art. With an emphasis on binding, illustration, and graphic design, the course will examine the structural and aesthetic elements of the book balanced against the larger background of cultural history.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

ARTH O275 Art & the Jesuits in Early Modern Rome
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This summer immersion course in Rome examines two emergent, often interconnected cultural phenomena of the Renaissance and Baroque periods: an era-defining shift in the production, forms, and purposes of art and architecture; and a new religious order, the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), whose members came to wield great influence in Italy and beyond as educators, scholars, papal advisors, and arts patrons.

ARTH O305 Italian Renaissance Art
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course presents the major works and principal painters, sculptors, and architects, ca. 1300-1600, in the main centers of art production on the Italian peninsula: Rome, Florence, Siena, and Venice.  Broadly chronological, the course takes a thematic approach to individual topics, including artists’ social status, esteem for classical antiquity, humanism, evolving patterns of patronage, the internationalization of art, studio practice and artistic techniques. Concern for context underlies investigations of form, content, and function.

ARTH O310 Art Between the Wars
3.00 crs.

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course examines how visual artists working in Europe and North America explored and redefined the relationship between art and politics during the years 1918 to 1939. Artists representing a wide range of practices and disciplines will be considered (among them, Pablo Picasso, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Dorothea Lange). Through the close reading of texts by major literary figures of the period (including Walter Benjamin, André Breton, and Bertolt Brecht) this course explores the critical terms through which the art of this era has been understood and discussed