Course Descriptions

Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT B202 Principles of Financial Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed to introduce students to accounting in a way that demonstrates the importance of accounting to society and the relevance of accounting to their future careers.  The objective of the course is for students to understand the essential financial components of businesses and to realize that accounting information is imperative in the decision making process of investors, creditors, management, and others.

Prerequisite(s): Overall GPA of 2.0
ACCT B203 Principles of Managerial Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers uses of accounting information for managerial decision making to aid planning and control activities of managers in business enterprises. Topics include methods for determining the costs of products and services, for assessing product and project profitability, and for budgeting and monitoring of costs and profits.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial Accounting Sophomore
ACCT B300 Tax Accounting I (Individual)
Credit Hours:
3.50

This course examines the concepts and methods of determining federal income tax liability for individuals. Topics emphasized include personal deductions, capital gain and loss provisions, and accounting methods.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial Accounting Sophomore
ACCT B305 Intermediate Accounting I
Credit Hours:
3.00

First of a two-course sequence. This course examines accounting concepts and principles that support the financial statements and related disclosures for external financial reporting in the United States. Emphasis is on financial statement presenation and disclosure through the development of skills in recording and reporting transactions, identification of financial reporting and measurement alternatives, and interpretation of the effects of alternatives on the financial statements. Coverage includes an overview of major financial statements including the statement of cash flows, revenue recognition, and assest topics.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial Accounting Sophomore
ACCT B306 Intermediate Accounting II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation of ACCT B305. Emphasis is on financial statement presentation and disclosure through development of skills in recording and reporting transactions, identification of financial reporting and measurement alternatives, and interpretation of the effects of alternatives on the financial statements. Coverage includes liability and equity topics, including earnings per share

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting I Sophomore
ACCT B307 Government + Nonprofit Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed to help students become aware of the vitality of government and not-for-profit accounting and of the intellectual challenges that are presented.  This course studies accounting, budgeting, fiscal processes, and the financial records of governmental agencies and non-profit organizations. Fund accounting is introduced and emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting I Sophomore
ACCT B310 Strategic Cost Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course emphasizes contemporary topics in strategic cost management through an understanding of the underlying concepts and fundamental techniques involved in cost accounting for manufacturing and service companies. Job-order, process, and standard costing are examined to support an understanding of just-in-time and activity based systems, continuous improvement, quality measurements, and the theory of constraints, among others. Emphasis is on how cost management systems, with their performance evaluation and reward systems, encourage efforts to achieve an organization’s strategic goals.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial Accounting Sophomore
ACCT B340 Accounting Information Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course emphasizes the problems of integrating automatic data processing and accounting information systems. Problems inherent in the development of systems and modeling are also covered.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting I Sophomore
ACCT B400 Advanced Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed for students to study the accounting reporting principles and procedures used in a variety of multi-corporate entity activities including mergers, acquisitions, and complex business transactions including consolidations.  Partnership formation, operation and changes in membership as well as partnership liquidations are also covered.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting I Junior
ACCT B401 Tax Accounting II (Corporate)
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers concepts and methods of determining federal income tax liability for corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts.

Prerequisite(s): Tax Accounting I (Individual) Junior
ACCT B403 Auditing + Assurance Services
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to auditing and assurance services in the public accounting profession. The course covers the auditing environment, the auditing process, and the application of auditing concepts to various types of audits, including financial, operational, and compliance.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting II Senior
ACCT B460 International Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers topics including comparison of accounting between US GAAP and IFRS; examination of common financial, managerial, and tax accounting issues faced by U.S. multinational firms, including the impact of transactions conducted in foreign currencies; defenses against currency rate changes such as forward exchange forward contracts; and the restatement of foreign currency financial statements for overseas subsidiaries.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting II Senior
ACCT B493 Special Topics in Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Accounting offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s): Junior
ACCT B499 Independent Study in Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

See description in College of Business overview

Prerequisite(s): Junior, Overall GPA of 2.0
ACCT B715 Financial + Managerial Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides an overview of how financial data can be used by managers, entrepreneurs, and executives to improve the decision-making process and improve organizational productivity and performance. The financial accounting portion of the course develops student skills in reading and understanding financial statements, analyzing investments, and measuring and assessing financial performance. The managerial accounting portion of the course develops student skills in budgeting, cost accounting, cash flow analysis, and the analysis and interpretation of internal financial reports.

This is an MBA Core course. 

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT B893 Special Topics in Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Accounting offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT B899 Independent Study in Accounting
Credit Hours:
3.00

See description of Independent Study course guidelines in MBA Program Overview

Prerequisite(s):

Arabic (ARAB)

ARAB A100 First Year Arabic I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Modern Arabic. Students learn the Arabic alphabet, basic writing and conversational skills, and entry-level Arabic grammar, including gender of nouns and verbs and regular conjunctions. Students are also exposed to Arabic culture and customs of polite society.

Prerequisite(s):
ARAB A101 First Year Arabic II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course, a continuation of ARAB A100, expands students' vocabulary and use of basic grammatical structures. Lessons focus on the sound patterns of Arabic, with attention to mastery of scripts, pronunciation and listening comprehension.

Prerequisite(s): First Year Arabic II or placement

Art History (ARTH)

ARTH M300 Art After Modernism
Credit Hours:
3.00

Art after Modernism traces the development of art in the U.S. and Europe, following a rough chronology from the end of the Second World War through the present. This course covers the major movements with which artists of the last half-century have been associated (including Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, and Conceptual art) and explores the critical and theoretical terms with which this art has been discussed. 

Prerequisite(s): Modern Art or permission of instructor, Required of all art majors
ARTH M350 Aesthetics: As Practiced in Theory
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores some of the major intellectual currents that have shaped art criticism, as well as artistic practice, over much of the previous century. Selected readings cover a variety of theoretical approaches to aesthetics, ranging from formalist criticism and social history to psychoanalysis and feminist criticism. In addition to participating in discussions of weekly assigned readings, students write and present a research paper on a topic of their choosing.

Prerequisite(s): Art After Modernism May be waived for non-VISA students with permission of instructor.
ARTH M496 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH M497 Internship/Practicum
Credit Hours:
3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH M499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
3.00

Independent work done under professorial supervision.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O160 Introduction to Art History I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the history of (primarily) Western art from prehistory through the Late Medieval period in Europe and the Mediterranean. Organized chronologically, it nevertheless takes a thematic approach to the production of material culture over time, focusing attention on such decisive factors as power, gender, patronage, iconography, etc. Always concerned with context as well as questions of form or style, readings, lectures, discussions, and writing assignments highlight the various social, political, and religious functions of art within Western cultures, while also examining specific techniques and practices developed and deployed by artists.

Prerequisite(s): Required of all art and design majors., Open to all students
ARTH O162 Introduction to Art History II
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course is designed to follow ARTH O160 Intro to Art History I and provides an introduction to the history of Western art from the Early Renaissance period to the modern period. Organized chronologically, it nevertheless takes a thematic approach to the production of material culture over time, focusing attention on such decisive factors as power, gender, patronage, iconography, etc. Always concerned with context as well as questions of form or style, readings, lectures, discussions, and writing assignments highlight the various social, political, and religious functions of art within Western cultures, while also examining specific techniques and practices developed and deployed by artists.

Prerequisite(s): Required of all art and design majors., Open to all students
ARTH O206 Music & Art in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course will examine intersections between music and the visual arts during the middle ages and the early modern period, focusing on selected cultural moments such as the court of Charlemagne c. 800, the cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris c. 1200, and Florence in the fifteenth centuries.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O215 Modern Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

Modern Art traces the development of modernism in Western art, following a rough chronology from the late nineteenth century in Europe to the end of the Second World War in Europe and the United States. This course covers the major stylistic movements with which modern artists have been associated (including Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism) and explores the critical and theoretical terms with which this art has been discussed.

Prerequisite(s): Required of all art and design majors., Open to all students
ARTH O220 Medieval Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course is a survey of medieval art and visual culture, primarily in the West and in Islamic lands, ca. AD 300-1400. Major media considered include architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination, wall and panel painting, and luxury arts, with an emphasis on the production and use of objects and structures in cultural context.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O236 Women in Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course will present the role and image of women in visual arts as portrayed by men and women, from antiquity to the present, in the light of sociopolitical, cultural, and moral conditions and values. The work of women artists will be central.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O243 Art and History of the Book
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course is an overview of the history of the book as a cataloging device for information and as a work of art. With an emphasis on binding, illustration, and graphic design, the course will examine the structural and aesthetic elements of the book balanced against the larger background of cultural history.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O275 Art & the Jesuits in Early Modern Rome
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This summer immersion course in Rome examines two emergent, often interconnected cultural phenomena of the Renaissance and Baroque periods: an era-defining shift in the production, forms, and purposes of art and architecture; and a new religious order, the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), whose members came to wield great influence in Italy and beyond as educators, scholars, papal advisors, and arts patrons.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O305 Italian Renaissance Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course presents the major works and principal painters, sculptors, and architects, ca. 1300-1600, in the main centers of art production on the Italian peninsula: Rome, Florence, Siena, and Venice.  Broadly chronological, the course takes a thematic approach to individual topics, including artists’ social status, esteem for classical antiquity, humanism, evolving patterns of patronage, the internationalization of art, studio practice and artistic techniques. Concern for context underlies investigations of form, content, and function.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTH O310 Art Between the Wars
Credit Hours:
3.00

Creative Arts & Cultures

This course examines how visual artists working in Europe and North America explored and redefined the relationship between art and politics during the years 1918 to 1939. Artists representing a wide range of practices and disciplines will be considered (among them, Pablo Picasso, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Dorothea Lange). Through the close reading of texts by major literary figures of the period (including Walter Benjamin, André Breton, and Bertolt Brecht) this course explores the critical terms through which the art of this era has been understood and discussed

Prerequisite(s):

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL A106 Cells and Heredity
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course emphasizes the principles and concepts of chemical, cellular, and genetic processes common to all life. Topics include the scientific method, basic chemical concepts, macromolecules, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure, membrane structure, energy and metabolism, meiosis, mitosis, Mendelian inheritance, and the Central Dogma.
 

Prerequisite(s): Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257 Calculus I or completion of MATH A257
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A107 Cells and Heredity Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Students investigate the scientific method, basic chemical concepts, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, Mendelian inheritance, and the structure, function, and technological uses of DNA.  This laboratory course emphasizes student-designed experiments, data collection and analysis, oral and written presentation, and the use of the scientific literature.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Cells and Heredity Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257 Calculus I
BIOL A108 Biology of Organisms
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course compares the functional biology of microbes, plants, and animals focusing on morphology, physiology, reproduction, development and natural history.

 

Prerequisite(s): Cells and Heredity, Cells and Heredity Lab or permission of the Department Chair, Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A109 Biology of Organisms Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This course examines the diversity of life through field trips, demonstrations, dissections, and experimental activities. Form and function of microbes, plants, and animals are compared to demonstrate how organisms have adapted to their environments. Lab fee $100.
 

Prerequisite(s): Cells and Heredity, Cells and Heredity Lab or permission of the Department Chair, Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Students examine animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.

Prerequisite(s): Cells and Heredity, Cells and Heredity Lab, Biology of Organisms, Biology of Organisms Lab
BIOL A300 Microbiology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the structure, function, metabolism, ecology, and pathogenesis of viruses, arachaea, bacteria and eukaryotic microbes.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A301 Microbiology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A300 and provides students with skills needed to isolate, identify and study the form and function of microorganisms.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A303 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course uses lectures, readings, demonstrations, and discussions to compare the diversity, form and function of vertebrates.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A304 Comparative Anatomy–Vertebrate Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A303 and provides students with skills needed to dissect, analyze and compare anatomical adaptations in major groups of vertebrates.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A305 Histology
Credit Hours:
2.00

The study of the microscopic structure of tissues and organs of the mammalian body and the study of the fundamentals of hematology are the focus of this course. 

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A306 Histology Lab
Credit Hours:
2.00

Laboratory experience that meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A305.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A308 Developmental Biology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Events and mechanisms of developmental genetics, gametogenesis, fertilization, morphogenesis, and organogenesis in selected vertebrates and invertebrates are examined. The laboratory includes experimental approaches to the study of development.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A309 Developmental Biology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A308.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A314 Anatomy and Physiology I
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, students learn about the principles of anatomy and physiology, part I: This includes the study of the anatomy of the human body and how different organ systems work both individually and together in humans. The organ systems of focus are the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous organ systems. Also considered is how disruptions in normal function cause disease, and how the human body is (or is not) able to return to homeostasis.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A315 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A314 and provides students with skills needed to examine both normal and pathological form and function of the human body at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organ system levels. The focus will be on human skeletal, muscle, nervous, heart & circulatory, blood, respiratory, urinary, vision and auditory systems. Lab fee $50.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A316 Anatomy and Physiology II
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, students learn about the principles of anatomy and physiology, part II: This includes the study of the anatomy of the human body and how different organ systems work both individually and together in humans. The organ systems of focus are endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive organ systems. Also considered is how disruptions in normal function cause disease, and how the human body is (or is not) able to return to homeostasis.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A317 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A316 and provides students with skills needed to examine normal form and function of the domestic cat body at the tissue, organ, and organ system levels. The focus will be on cat muscle, digestive, heart & circulatory, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lab fee $50.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A320 Entomology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the diversity of insects, their structural adaptations, evolution, classification, life histories and habits, and their economic importance. An extensive insect collection is the focus of the experiential learning process with an emphasis on the natural history of the group. 

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A321 Entomology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Laboratory experience that meets in conjunction with BIOL A320.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A326 Molecular Genetics
Credit Hours:
3.00

Fundamentals of molecular genetics such as transcription, DNA synthesis and repair, and RNA processing are discussed. Through review and discussion of scientific literature and laboratory experience, students learn the process of scientific investigation, recent findings and new technologies in the field of molecular genetics.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A327 Molecular Genetics Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A326.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A328 Genetic Analysis
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course addresses advanced topics in transmission genetics, cytogenetics, evolutionary genetics and mutagenesis. Emphasis is placed on development of quantitative skills and written and oral communication.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A330 Ecology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines basic ecological principles and concepts including the nature of the ecosystem, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and the ecology of populations and communities.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A331 Ecology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory meets four to five hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A330 and provides students with skills needed to quantify ecological interactions of plants and animals.  This course requires student participation in multiple field trips.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A334 Biology of Fishes
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines phylogenetic relationships, functional morphology, physiology, sensory biology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, biogeography, and conservation of fishes.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A335 Biology of Fishes Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A334 and provides students with skills needed to understand phylogeny, form, function and natural history of fishes.  This course requires student participation in multiple fieldtrips.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A336 Animal Behavior
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines behavioral adaptations of animals and critically evaluates hypotheses to account for the evolution of these adaptations. Student activities emphasize field observation of animal behavior, experimental design, and scientific communication.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A338 Plant Ecology
Credit Hours:
3.00

An introduction to the quantitative study of plants and their environment.  Emphasis is placed on understanding the functional ecology of individual plants and vegetation in terrestrial ecosystems.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A339 Plant Ecology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory course accompanying BIOL A338 and exposes students to modern field and laboratory techniques in plant physiological ecology.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A341 Plant Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

An introduction to applied botany emphasizing the biology and utilization of cultivated plants. The lecture
will examine the structure and function of plants and explore the relationships between plants, people,
agriculture, and the environment. The laboratory will emphasize economic botany and introduce students to
basic horticultural techniques in the context of independent research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Ecology and Evolution
BIOL A342 Plant Science Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A341.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Ecology and Evolution
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A345 Herpetology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the study of morphology, adaptation, classification, distribution, and ecology of amphibians and reptiles. Students participate in field work and identification of North American groups and field studies of local fauna. 

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A346 Herpetology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Field and laboratory experience that meets six hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A345.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A347 Parasitology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course emphasizes parasites of public health concern, and includes review of recent studies using current technologies. Major conceptual themes also include: Evolutionary relationships, virulence, origins of a parasitic life, life histories, manipulation of hosts, host immune responses, and consequences for host. 

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A355 Conservation Biology
Credit Hours:
3.00

The study of the conservation of biodiversity based in the principles of ecology, evolution, and genetics. The primary goal of this course is to understand natural ecological systems in the context of a human dominated world to learn to best maintain biological diversity in concert with an exploding human population. This is accomplished through lecture, socratic discussion, and videos.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A356 Aquatic Microbiology
Credit Hours:
3.00

An introduction to the study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes as well as viruses in the aquatic environment. The course emphasizes the functional role of microbes in aquatic habitats, the relationship of microbial biodiversity to environmental gradients and the interaction of aquatic microbes with human affairs.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A357 Aquatic Microbiology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Field and laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A356. Students are exposed to modern field and laboratory techniques used with prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes from aquatic habitats. Field trips emphasize local freshwater and estuarine environments.  Lab fee $100.

 

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A360 Cell Biology
Credit Hours:
3.00

An analysis of cell structure and function. Topics covered in the course include protein synthesis, the nucleus, cytoplasmic organelles and bioenergetics, endomembrane systems, vesicular transport, the cytoskeleton, cell signaling, cell cycle control, and cancer.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A361 Cell Biology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A360.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
Corequisite(s):
BIOL A365 Immunology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the field of experimental cellular and molecular immunology. Topics include organization of the immune system, structure and function of antigen recognition molecules, immune cell interactions, and regulation of the immune system and immunity-related diseases.  Clinical immunology is not emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A400 Research Proposal
Credit Hours:
1.00

Students work with a faculty research adviser to identify an original question in the biological sciences and develop and write a proposal/prospectus to investigate this question. This course is required of all biology honors students and students intending to complete a thesis in biological sciences.

Prerequisite(s): Biology core courses
BIOL A402 Research Thesis
Credit Hours:
1.00

Students work with a faculty research adviser to prepare a written thesis describing their original research and make an oral presentation at the undergraduate research symposium. This course is required of all biology honors students and students intending to complete a thesis in biological sciences.


Corequisite: BIOL A401

Prerequisite(s): Research Proposal
BIOL A405 Biochemistry I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the major classes of biological macromolecules: Proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and sugars. Physical, chemical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of macromolecules and their behavior are emphasized based on an understanding of the underlying principles of bonding, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Topics covered include protein structure and folding, experimental methods used to characterize and manipulate proteins and DNA, allostery and other types of regulation, molecular disease, enzyme mechanism and inhibition, and membranes. This course is cross-listed with CHEM-A400: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry II Lecture
BIOL A491 Biology ETS Exam
Credit Hours:
0.00

Exit exam for Biological Sciences majors. 

Prerequisite(s):
BIOL A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite(s):
BIOL H295 Honors Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines an in-depth topic in biology--content varies.

Prerequisite(s): University Honors Program, or permission of instructor
BIOL T121 Bioinquiry - First-Year Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

Foundation Courses: First-Year Seminar

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. BioInquiry is required for all first-year biology majors, but is also open to students in other majors who are interested in this topic. This course aims to engage students in the process of scientific inquiry while providing a framework for academic success at Loyola. Students will gain proficiency in experimental design, quantitative reasoning, scientific communication, and collaboration skills. Contemporary research questions will span cellular and molecular biology, physiology, organismal biology, ecology, and evolution. Each section of this course explores a unique theme that will instill an awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of biology and its relationship to societal issues. There is a lab fee associated with this course.

Prerequisite(s):
BIOL Y205 Topics in Biogeography
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course involves the study of distribution of life across our planet, past and present.  A tour of the world’s biomes is explored with emphasis on ecological, environmental, and economic issues, such as destruction of tropical rainforests, the effect of climate change on the arctic polar bears, and the loss of the American chestnut tree.  Special topics include animal migration, invasive species, extinction, climate change, the Dust Bowl, the story of the American bison, and the disappearing coral reefs.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y210 Biology Through Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course covers the scientific method, and the basics of experiment design. This course integrates biology and art through the creation of artworks. Students view microorganisms, see examples of using DNA as an artistic medium, and see anatomy as art. The course culminates in students creating their own biological self-portrait. With biotechnology becoming a greater part of our daily lives, there seems to be a movement in the art world to integrate art and science.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y230 Human Ecology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course is a study of the ‘human condition’ with a focus on ecology and evolutionary biology. The course explores the thesis that humans have caused an ecological crisis that is manifested in the principal topics of climate change, biodiversity loss, habitat destruction, and overpopulation.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y236 Evolution
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

Evolution is the unifying concept in biology and this course uses lectures, readings, discussions, and exercises to explore the processes, mechanisms, and patterns of biological evolution. Human evolution and the impact of humans on biodiversity and ecosystems are examined in detail.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y237 Marine Biology & Conservation
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course examines diversity, physiology, ecology, and conservation of microbes, plants, and animals that live in the marine environment. Emphasis is placed on how marine organisms have adapted to living in their environment and how humans depend upon and affect marine ecosystems.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y238 Genetics & Society
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course addresses applications of genetics in modern society, and considers controversies surrounding contemporary issues, such as genetic manipulation. Topics covered include genetic engineering, medical applications, and co-evolution of humans and other organisms.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y240 Plant Natural History
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course explores the world of microscopic and macroscopic plants, with special emphasis on their anatomy, reproduction, nutrition, biological diversity, and cultural and economic importance.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y244 Mississippi River Delta Ecology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course is a study of the ecology of the Mississippi River deltaic plain. Emphasis is placed on the importance of coastal erosion, accompanied by study of the physical and biological aspects of the Mississippi River, its delta, estuaries, and their habitats and flora and fauna, and relevant environmental and human issues.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y250 Tropical Ecology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course examines biology, ecology, and conservation of flora and fauna of tropical ecosystems.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y251 Tropical Ecology Fieldtrip
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory is a required study-abroad field-trip to a country such as Belize, Ecuador, or Panama to experience first-hand the unique natural history and unparalleled biodiversity of tropical ecosystems. 

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
Corequisite(s):
BIOL Y260 Human Biology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course provides an overview of structure and function of the human body with special emphasis on understanding how the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, muscular, skeletal, nervous, endocrine, immune, and reproductive systems work together to maintain homeostasis and the interrelatedness of health, wellness, and the environment.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y262 Human Sociobiology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course examines the evolutionary basis of human social behavior.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
BIOL Y264 Global Ecology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course examines the basic concepts of ecology, including the nature of ecosystems, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and characteristics of populations and communities of organisms. The role of humans in the ecosphere is emphasized, with particular attention to human population problems, food production, and pollution problems.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature

Business Administration (BA)

BA B100 Introduction to Business
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course introduces the nature of business and its complexities in the context of the environment in which it operates. Subjects covered include ownership forms, organization, management, marketing, accounting, financial institutions, labor relations, basic word processing, e-mail, spreadsheets, data base, library resources, and small businesses.

Prerequisite(s):
BA B101 Business Communications
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course serves to improve the student's ability to create successful communication products–both written and oral. Topics include the process for successful communication, team communication business writing, report writing using style guidelines, online communication, and presentation skills.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Business, Critical Reading and Writing
BA B415 Business Ethics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the sources of societal pressure, business reaction, and the community’s expectation. The entire spectrum of corporate and government activities are discussed against the framework of the demands made on the firm and government by forces outside of the marketplace.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Macroeconomics, Management + Organizational Behavior, Making Moral Decisions Senior
BA B445 Business Policy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides students with the opportunity to integrate the skills acquired in prior coursework in analyzing the internal and external environments of organizations and has students learn how to formulate and implement strategies that will allow a firm to compete successfully within its environment.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management, Management + Organizational Behavior, Production + Operation Management, Principles of Marketing Senior
BA B493 Special Topics
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Accounting offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s): Junior
BA B497 Business Internship
Credit Hours:
3.00

Internships give you the chance to explore your chosen field, as well as, allow you to pursue specialized business topics in a professional setting. One internship is required for graduation. See description in College of Business Overview for a complete listing of requirements and approval process.

See description in College of Business overview

Prerequisite(s): Junior, Overall GPA of 2.0
BA B499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
3.00

See description in College of Business overview

Prerequisite(s): Junior, Overall GPA of 2.0
BA B701 MBA Experience Week
Credit Hours:
1.00

This MBA Core course serves a workshop to introduce students to graduate level study in business and is the formal academic orientation to the MBA program. Students meet and interact with College of Business MBA faculty, staff, and MBA students. Students will also be introduced to strategies for successful team work, case analysis, and financial statement analysis in order to be prepared for success in the MBA program.

Prerequisite(s):
BA B702 Venture + Ideation Week
Credit Hours:
1.00

In this MBA Core course, students will be engaged with the New Orleans entrepreneurial ecosystem and will experience entrepreneurial processes by formulating an idea, a business model and a pitch presentation. Students learn techniques for effective, iterative development of entrepreneurial ideas into marketable and scalable business concepts. By engaging with local entrepreneurs, faculty and each other, students also build teamwork skills relevant to fast-paced, project based work environments.

Prerequisite(s):
BA B703 Career Management Week
Credit Hours:
1.00

This MBA Core course will help students formulate career goals and development paths and analyze possible careers in different industries and organizations. Students participate in career workshops that help them develop a better understanding of the job market, attend coaching sessions to develop professional plans after their MBA, develop skills in business professionalism, and interact with alumni, entrepreneurs, and executives.

Prerequisite(s):
BA B704 Ethics + Social Justice Week
Credit Hours:
1.00

Ethics + Social Justice Week is an MBA Core course introducing students to issues related to ethical behavior and social justice and applies them to real business cases and dilemmas.  In addition, it introduces students to the Jesuit value system and how Jesuit values apply to ethical issues in business.  Students will become more self-conscious and constructively self-critical of their ethical preconceptions. Students will be better able to identify ethical challenges and be aware of the strategies of resources available to deal with them effectively.

Prerequisite(s):
BA B750 Competitive Strategy (Capstone)
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA Core course focuses on the roles and activities of general managers, executives, leaders, entrepreneurs, and other executives who run businesses. Students develop skills in competitive analysis and the analysis of industry structure, as well as in formulating or executing strategy in small, diverse, or multinational firms. The course focuses on case analysis to analyze ambiguous problems, develop strategic-thinking skills, and apply analytical models to solve complex problems. As the capstone course, it integrates all the knowledge gleaned from MBA coursework and applies that knowledge through the creation of a comprehensive business plan. This business plan will demonstrate mastery of business philosophy, theory, application, and practice through the design and integration of strategies and plans needed to meet the overall aim of the organization. Successful completion of the business plan will demonstrate the mastery sufficient for advancement into a professional career.

BA B750 must be taken in last semester of residence. 
 

Prerequisite(s):
BA B893 Special Topics in Business
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Business offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s):
BA B899 Independent Study in Business
Credit Hours:
3.00

See description of independent study guidelines in the MBA Program Overview.

Prerequisite(s):
BA T121 First-Year Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. First-Year Seminars at Loyola are small, discussion-based seminars that introduce new college students to academic inquiry at the university level by investigating a relevant topic. Specially-trained faculty lead these seminars in a way that instills in students the academic skills necessary to become successful Loyola students. Course titles may differ from section to section based on the instructor's focus for the course.

Prerequisite(s):

Business Analytics (BUAN)

BUAN B205 Business Statistics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the statistics used in business. Topics covered are sources and collection of business data, describing data, probability concepts, the use of confidence limits to estimate the mean or the proportion, the use of hypothesis tests, analysis of variance, and simple correlation and linear regression to discover how two variables are related to each other. The use of Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software is an integral part of this hands-on course.

Prerequisite(s): Concepts in College Algebra, Introduction to Finite Mathematics Any of the prerequisites are accepted, Sophomore
BUAN B305 Business Decision Modeling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers the development and interpretation of statistical, financial, and mathematical models for business decision making. Modeling techniques discussed may include applied probability distributions, time series analysis / forecasting, classification and/or clustering models, scenario / what-if analysis, linear optimization and sensitivity analysis, simulation models, decision trees / decision analysis, and expected value / utility analysis. Students gain expertise in the application of rigorous quantitative analysis to complex business decisions in the areas of strategic planning, financial management, and operations research.

Prerequisite(s): Business Statistics, Management Information Systems Junior
BUAN B310 Decision Support Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers the use and design of the information, knowledge / intelligence, and technological resources that are employed by managerial decision makers to gain a better understanding of a business and its customers. “Decision support systems” refers to the “front-end” technology that is generally associated with a data warehouse, and which provides modeling and analysis capabilities to help key decision makers evaluate ways in which to improve business operations and reach organizational goals. This course covers general topics related to the design of such systems, as well as practical issues of implementation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Customer Relationship Management (CRM), “dashboard” analytics, or other business applications. Data security and ethics are also considered.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Programming I, Information Systems Theory & Practice, Accounting Information Systems Junior, Either COSC A208, MGT B250, or ACCT B340 is acceptable
BUAN B360 Econometrics I - Linear Models
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an intermediate level statistics course. After a brief overview of statistics, the course covers least squares estimation, statistical inference, diagnostic methods, selection and evaluation of functional form, and simultaneous equations estimation. The course focuses more on applied work than on its theoretical underpinnings. Students are actively involved with computer exercises in this course, using the STATA software program. Students will complete a comprehensive statistical research project.

Prerequisite(s): Business Statistics, Principles of Macroeconomics Junior
BUAN B365 Econometrics II - Time Series
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an advanced level statistics course focusing on time-series models. The course covers how to detect, estimate, and make valid inferences from univariate, multivariate and potentially panel data. Classic univariate models may include autoregressive, moving average, integrated, and distributed lag models; multivariate models may include vector autoregressions and cointegrated models; and panel-data models include panel-VARs. The course focuses more on applied work than on its theoretical underpinnings. Students are actively involved with computer exercises in this course, using the STATA software program. Students will complete a comprehensive statistical research project.

Prerequisite(s): Econometrics I - Linear Models Junior
BUAN B375 Contemporary Managerial Decision Making
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course prepares students to be effective decision-makers by providing diagnostic and analytical tools / skills for informing effective decisions. A course project requires students to use (1) diagnostic skills to formulate problems, (2) decision-modeling skills to frame and manage results and risk, (3) data collection skills to obtain appropriate information, (4) data analysis skills to draw conclusions, (5) oral and written communication skills to explain why/how the problem can be solved, and (6) managerial skills such as planning, organizing, leading, and controlling to show how the solution can be deployed.

Prerequisite(s): Production + Operation Management Junior
BUAN B390 Consumer Analysis + Research
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course teaches the student how to measure and analyze consumer attitudes and behavior. Measurement techniques covered include observation, interviews, focus groups, and surveys. Analysis tools used include descriptive statistics, chi square, and spreadsheet analysis for value determination.

Prerequisite(s): Business Statistics, Principles of Marketing Junior
BUAN B493 Special Topics in Decision Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Decision Science offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s): Junior
BUAN B725 Managerial Economics + Statistics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA Core course develops qualitative and quantitative approaches for problem-solving and decision-making in the field of management. Students will learn how to use theoretical and analytical tools from the fields of economics and statistics to enhance their ability to understand real world problems, identify possible solutions, and make the right managerial decisions to achieve organizational performance excellence.

Prerequisite(s):
BUAN B835 Business Decision Modeling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA Elective course covers the development and interpretation of statistical, financial, and mathematical models for business decision making. Modeling techniques discussed may include applied probability distributions, time series analysis / forecasting, classification and/or clustering models, scenario / what-if analysis, linear optimization and sensitivity analysis, simulation models, decision trees / decision analysis, and expected value / utility analysis. Students gain expertise in the application of rigorous quantitative analysis to complex business decisions in the areas of strategic planning, financial management, and operations research.

Prerequisite(s): Managerial Economics + Statistics
BUAN B893 Special Topics in Decision Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Decision Science offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s):
BUAN B899 Independent Study in Decision Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

See description of independent study guidelines in the MBA Program Overview.

Prerequisite(s):

Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM A100 Chem Prep
Credit Hours:
3.00

This elective, pass-fail course is designed for students who want to take CHEM A105 but lack the prerequisites. Students develop and refine their ability to solve arithmetic, algebraic, and dimensional analysis types of problems using examples from the physical sciences, primarily chemistry and physics. Upon successful completion of this course, students have a strong foundation for General Chemistry I, CHEM A105. 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
CHEM A102 Introduction to Organic & Biological Chemistry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a 3-credit survey course of general, organic and biological chemistry with an emphasis on applications to the human body. Topics discussed include scientific measurement, atomic theory and structure, bonding, quantitative relationships in chemicals reactions, gases, solutions, electrolytes, organic functional groups and nomenclature, organic reactions, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, metabolism, nucleic acids, radiation and nuclear medicine as it relates to nursing students. 

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A105 General Chemistry I Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is the first half of a one-year course in the fundamental principles of general chemistry. This is the first chemistry course for all science majors and includes the development of modern atomic theory, chemical bonding and structure, and the nature of matter and physical states. Included is an introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics with a more thorough development of equilibria concepts. Descriptive chemistry is liberally sprinkled throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s): Calculus I Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257 Calculus I, ACT score of 23 or higher / SAT score of 560 or higher, Completion of MATH A118 Pre-Calculus Math
CHEM A107 General Chemistry I Laboratory
Credit Hours:
1.00

This lab involves experiments to accompany General Chemistry Lecture. One three-hour laboratory period per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry I Lecture Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
CHEM A108 General Chemistry II Laboratory
Credit Hours:
1.00

This lab involves experiments to accompany General Chemistry II Lecture and includes qualitative analysis.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry I Laboratory Grade of C- or better in listed prerequisites, or permission of the Department Chair
CHEM A115 Chemistry of the Crime Scene
Credit Hours:
3.00

Chemistry of the Crime Scene covers basic crime scene protocol (documentation, collection, chain of custody); presumptive testing for drugs, primer (gun shot) residue, and body fluids; and the chemistry of latent print development. No science background is required, but scientific curiosity is expected, and fundamental chemistry concepts will be covered. Course fee $100.

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A300 Organic Chemistry I Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this first semester organic course, students learn the concepts and skills necessary to have a strong foundation in organic chemistry. This course includes: drawing, visualizing, and describing in words the bonding motifs and interactions in organic chemistry; showing how acid base chemistry relates to structure and reactions; applying kinetics and thermodynamics to reactions; showing the mechanistic path for reactions and applying these concepts to functional groups.

Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry II Lecture or permission of the Department Chair
CHEM A301 Organic Chemistry II Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this second semester organic course, students build upon the concepts of Organic 1 (A300) This includes: showing the mechanistic path for more advanced reactions; identifying and suggesting reagents, starting materials, and products for multi-step syntheses of organic compounds; writing about scientific topics; using NMR, IR, and Mass spectroscopy to identify organic compounds and applying all of these concepts to functional groups.

Corequisites: either CHEM A311 Organic Chemistry II Lab or CHEM A314 (Advanced) Synthesis & Characterization. 

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry I Lecture Grade of C- or higher in CHEM A300 or permission of department chair
CHEM A302 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory for Chemistry Majors
Credit Hours:
2.00

This two-credit-hour laboratory course for chemistry majors accompanies CHEM A300. Students combine knowledge with practical skills in this course by purifying, synthesizing, and identifing organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, organic reactions, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, melting point and NMR. Students learn to keep a lab notebook and to write a formal lab write-up. There are two, three-hour laboratory periods per week.  Lab fee $100.

Students may substitute CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 for CHEM A302. 

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A305 Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Credit Hours:
2.00

This laboratory course is for non-majors. Students combine knowledge with practical skills in this course by purifying, synthesizing, and identifying organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, organic reactions, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, and melting point. Students learn to keep a lab notebook. There are two, three-hour laboratory periods per week.  Lab fee $100.

Students may substitute CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 for CHEM A305. 

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry II Lecture
CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry I Lecture, General Chemistry II Lecture, General Chemistry I Laboratory, General Chemistry II Laboratory, Organic Chemistry II Lecture, Calculus I, Calculus II or permission of instructor
CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry I Lecture, General Chemistry II Lecture, General Chemistry I Laboratory, General Chemistry II Laboratory, Organic Chemistry II Lecture, Calculus I, Calculus II, Introduction to Mechanics, Introduction to Electromagnetism and Relativity or permission of instructor
CHEM A308 Physical Chemistry I Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This course is the accompanying lab for CHEM A306 which includes a survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

Prerequisite(s): Physical Chemistry I Lecture or permission of instructor, Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
CHEM A309 Physical Chemistry II Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This course is the accompanying lab for CHEM A307 which is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics

Prerequisite(s): Physical Chemistry II Lecture or permission of instructor, Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
CHEM A310 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Credit Hours:
1.00

This laboratory course accompanies CHEM A300, and is only taught in the summer. Loyola Chemistry majors must complete CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 to fulfill the CHEM A302 or CHEM A305 requirement. 

In this course, students combine knowledge with practical skills by purifying, synthesizing, and identifying organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, and melting point. Students also learn how to keep a lab notebook. There are three-hour laboratory periods four days per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A311 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Credit Hours:
1.00

This one-credit-hour laboratory course accompanies CHEM A301, and is only taught in the summer. Loyola Chemistry majors must complete CHEM A310 and CHEM A311 to fulfill the CHEM A302 or CHEM A305 requirement. 

In this course, students combine knowledge with practical skills in this course by purifying, synthesizing, and identifying organic compounds. Techniques include: organic reactions, recrystallization, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, and melting point. Students also learn how to keep a lab notebook. There are three-hour laboratory periods four days per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A314 (Advanced) Synthesis & Characterization
Credit Hours:
2.00

This advanced laboratory in organic chemistry for chemistry majors allows students to use modern spectroscopic methods in conjunction with synthesis to identify and/or determine the structure of organic compounds.  The overall goal of this lab-based course is to increase students’ skills in modern structure determination using IR-, NMR-, UV-Vis- and  Mass-spectroscopy.  Students also employ column chromatography for purification, and gas chromatography for identification. Lab Fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry I Lecture Either CHEM A302 or CHEM A305 or CHEM A310
CHEM A315 Introduction to Forensic Methods
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to instrumental and chemical analysis techniques used in forensic investigations. Topics covered may include: serological analysis, fingerprint analysis, soil and glass analysis, hair and fiber analysis, arson/explosive analysis, document analysis, and drug/toxicological analysis. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry I Lecture
CHEM A322 Analytical Chemistry Lab
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced laboratory with one hour of recitation each week for all chemistry majors. The lecture and experiments may cover a wide range of techniques and topics including chemical literature, inorganic synthesis and characterization, photochemistry, titrations, kinetics, extractions, UV-Vis, and chromatography. This laboratory is project-based and requires students to plan and execute experiments involving concepts and techniques from several subdisciplines.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): (Advanced) Synthesis & Characterization or permission of instructor
CHEM A332 Advanced Integrated Chemistry Laboratory
Credit Hours:
2.00

This course is an advanced chemistry laboratory that may involve synthesis, structural analysis, thermodynamics, chemical separations, electrochemistry, advanced kinetics, or spectroscopy. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Analytical Chemistry Lab
CHEM A350 Inorganic I Chemistry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This lecture course introduces students to various topics in inorganic chemistry. The topics covered include atomic structure, symmetry and group theory, introduction to ionic and covalent bonding models in coordination complexes, acid-base theories, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry II Lecture or permission of instructor
CHEM A400 Biochemistry I Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the major classes of biological macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and sugars. Physical, chemical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of macromolecules and their behavior are emphasized based on an understanding of the underlying principles of bonding, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Topics covered include protein structure and folding, experimental methods used to characterize and manipulate proteins and DNA, allostery and other types of regulation, molecular disease, enzyme mechanism and inhibition, and membranes. This course is cross-listed with BIOL-A405: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry II Lecture or permission of instructor
CHEM A401 Biochemistry II Lecture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a thorough coverage of metabolism and metabolic regulation. It begins with a brief review and expanded treatment of concepts from the first semester course of particular relevance to the study of metabolism such as energetics, membranes and membrane transport, receptors, and enzymes and their regulation. Topics covered include vitamins and cofactors, glycolysis, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, photosynthesis, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. Emphasis is placed on understanding the chemical conversions involved, the interplay between various metabolic processes, and on understanding a variety of metabolic diseases.

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry I Lecture
CHEM A402 Biochemistry I Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

Students perform selected chemical and instrumental techniques based on lecture material covered in CHEM A400. Topics include: Methods to label or sequence proteins, optical methods, NMR spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, column chromatography, introduction to basic molecular biology methods, and acrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry I Laboratory for Chemistry Majors, Biochemistry I Lecture or permission of instructor, CHEM A400 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite
CHEM A410 Instrumental Analysis
Credit Hours:
4.00

This combined lecture/lab course develops the principles of instrumental analysis.  Students learn advanced principles of electrochemical, spectrochemical, and chromatographic analysis.  Laboratory components provide hands-on training.  Topics include instrumentation, sample preparation, data analysis, and recent developments in analytical techniques, with a focus on applications in industry and graduate academic labs. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A320

 

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A486 Chemistry Seminar for Majors
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. 

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A490 Advanced Topics
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A493 Capstone Presentation
Credit Hours:
1.00

This course is designed to strengthen the student’s oral and writing skills in technical communication. A secondary objective is to practice skills retrieving data from the chemical literature in both written and electronic form. The course requires one paper and one oral presentation at the departmental seminar.

Prerequisite: CHEM A303CHEM A320, or permission of instructor

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A497 Internship/ Practicum
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM A498 Research
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

All majors are encouraged to, and honors program students must, register for one to three credit hours for each semester starting with the second semester of their sophomore years for a total of four credit hours. Credit is prorated on the basis of one credit hour for four hours devoted to research.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair
CHEM A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair
CHEM H295 Chemistry Honors Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

Topics vary.

University Honors Program

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM Y220 Chemistry of Technology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course is designed to allow students to explore the chemistry involved in technologies that impact our everyday existence. Participants develop an atomistic view of their universe while simultaneously cultivating an operational appreciation for techniques used by scientists around the world. Experiments include making soap, smelting bronze, and synthesizing renewable fuels. Lab fee $100

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
CHEM Y230 World Food and Nutrition
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course is an advanced common curriculum lecture course designed for non-science majors.  Topics include the basics of nutrition and the chemistry of metabolism as well as discussions pertinent to the problems of feeding the expanding world population.  This course is structured on a series of readings and online assignments.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
CHEM Y235 Beer Brewing
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

Beer Brewing is an intense hands-on course teaching the science of brewing beer. It is open to students 21-years-old and up. Beer Brewing will introduce you to the cultural, historical, economic and bio-chemical underpinnings of beer and the beer-brewing process. The course touches on botany, chemistry and microbiology, as well as societal and cultural history of beer and the processes involved in making beer. Lab fee $60
 

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
CHEM Y245 Chemistry and Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course represents an integration of materials concerning both Fine arts and Chemistry. It discusses the synergistic relationship between the development of chemical processes and their effects on the methods of artistic production. In pursuit of this goal, this course integrates the Chemical principles of matter and energy with the techniques and experiences of Art.

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature
CHEM Y246 Chemistry and Art Studio
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course integrates the chemical and physical principles of matter and energy with the techniques and experiences of art. The studio version of the course offers extensive hands-on learning in a laboratory setting. Projects include foam art, photography, jewelry, ceramics, and much more. Lab fee $100

Prerequisite(s): Investigating Nature

Classical Studies (CLHU)

CLHU A238 Justice In Greek Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces students to how ancient Greek culture constructed and enacted the concept of justice within its communities. Students are introduced to a variety of primary sources and secondary analyses in order to provide the background for instituting a "mock court" patterned after the dikasteria of 5th century BCE Athens.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A242 The Development of Greek Tragedy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course involves the reading in English of a selection of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and their relationship to the development of Greek theater and performance.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A244 The Greek and Roman Epic
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey in English of Greek and Latin epics, such as the works of Homer, Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, Lucan, and Statius.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A246 Greek Mythology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of the origins, themes, and significance of Greek mythology, with emphasis on myth as a vestige of primitive thought and on the corpus of Greek myths as a source of Greek and Roman literature.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A263 Greek and Roman Comedy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of Greek and Roman comedy including works by Aristophanes, Menander, Terence, and Plautus. The course considers the significant social and political issues as well as the plays’ appeal, significance, and legacy for us today.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A347 Egyptian Art and Archaeology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of artistic works and monuments of ancient Egypt from the Pre-dynastic Period through the Ptolemies of the Hellenistic Period with an emphasis on stylistic developments in the three main areas of painting, sculpture and architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A348 Greek Art and Archaeology
Credit Hours:
3.00

A survey of artistic works and monuments of ancient Greece from the Geometric through the Hellenistic periods (c. 1000 — 50 B.C.) with an emphasis on stylistic developments in the main areas of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A349 Etruscan Art and Archeology
Credit Hours:
3.00

A survey of the art, monuments, writing, and culture of the Etruscans from the 9th to the 1st century BCE. Students will study Etruscan history and learn to recognize the influence of the Etruscans on the Romans and later cultures.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A350 Roman Art and Archaeology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers students a survey of the most important works of art and monuments of ancient Rome from the beginnings of the city through the period of Constantine, emphasizing stylistic developments in the areas of sculpture, architecture, and painting, with some consideration of materials and techniques. Works of the Etruscans, Greeks, and Italic peoples are considered for their influence.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A356 Greek Elegies and Lyrics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to lyric and elegiac forms of individual poetic expression. Consideration will be given to the technical terms referring to the poems studied, their themes, and performance. Authors include Archilochus, Tyrtaeus, Alcaeus, and Sappho among others.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A480 Capstone: Special Topics
Credit Hours:
1.00

The capstone presents students with the opportunity to showcase their tools and techniques for analysis, interpretation, and research of literature and material culture necessary to pursuing a successful career in Classical Studies at all levels. 

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A498 Thesis Research
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU A499 Thesis or Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Students who have satisfactorily completed their research register for this course while they write their honors thesis. This course may also be used to perform independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite(s): Thesis Research Prerequisite is for thesis only
CLHU N200 WAL: Greek and Roman Epic
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Value Courses: Writing About Literature

This course is a survey in English of Greek and Latin Epics, such as the works of Homer, Hesiod, Apollonius of Rhodes, Quintus of Smyrna, Vergil, Lucan, and Statius. Excerpts from authors, both ancient and modern, and important works that discuss the nature and the role of epic poetry within society will also be included.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CLHU N202 WAL: Justice in Greek Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Value Courses: Writing About Literature

Justice is the foundation of civilized society. It is at once the condition and means of concord and harmony among people. Greek poets and philosophers were among the first to investigate the nature of justice. Examination of their writings on this subject can alert students to its importance and to its nature.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CLHU N356 WAL: Greek Elegies and Lyrics
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Value Courses: Writing About Literature

This course is an introduction to lyric and elegiac forms of individual poetic expression. Consideration will be given to the technical terms referring to the poems studied, their themes, and performance. Authors include Archilochus, Tyrtaeus, Alcaeus, and Sappho, among others, along related primary and secondary sources.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CLHU O246 Greek Mythology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Culture 

This course is a study of the origins, themes, and significance of Greek Mythology with emphasis on myth as a vestige of primitive thought and on the corpus of Greek myths as a source for Greek and Roman literature. 

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU O257 Greek Culture
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Value Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course is a multi-disciplinary survey of the interdependence of the arts and culture in the Greek world from its semi-legendary beginnings in the Mycenaean age through the Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period. Students explore the contribution of the arts on Greek culture, from architecture to sculpture to drama to cuisine, with particular emphasis on its extraordinary continuity throughout the centuries as well as its massive influence – by way of its reception from the Renaissance onwards - on the development of the art, thought and morality of the Western world.

Prerequisite(s):
CLHU O258 Roman Culture
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Value Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course examines the literature, culture, history, politics, and daily life of the ancient Romans from the legendary beginning of the city in 753 B.C. to the fifth century A.D. Readings include Latin literature in translation and secondary texts that provide archaeological evidence and the historical context.

Prerequisite(s):

Communications (CMMN)

CMMN A100 Introduction to Mass Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of the various fields of Mass Communication taught at Loyola and specific preparation for courses taught in the school. Consideration is given to philosophical foundations, historical development, current trends and status, organizational structure and career opportunities.

Prerequisite(s): Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A101 Communication Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course discusses the basic kinds of writing used most frequently in the media, informative and persuasive writing.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted, Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A201 Digital Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a hands-on course designed to introduce mass communication majors to the field of digital communications. Students learn critical thinking skills about the technology used to produce mass media messages in modern American society. They are introduced to visual theories as well as elements and principles of design for several key media: video, print and the web. The digital communication student  leaves this course versed in current media technologies with a critical understanding of its use in creating memorable and meaningful communication materials.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A225 Elements of AP Style
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course will teach the stylistic requirements of the Associated Press Stylebook. Using online instruction (web video, interactive online testing and Powerpoint presentations), along with written exams, this class will guide students chapter-by-chapter to understand the rules of usage that govern the mass communication industry.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN A250 Journalism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces students to news values and to the basics of news writing, reporting, visual storytelling and editing. Considerable time is devoted to directed practice in news writing and visual storytelling.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing, Videography
CMMN A251 News Editing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on the creation of newspaper and magazine formats, including copy and headline preparation and the social, legal and ethical ramifications of editing.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Journalism
CMMN A260 Introduction to Layout and Design
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course involves the creative use of two-dimensional space, using visual perceptions, principles of graphic design and their application, use of type in design, graphic interpretation, basic formats of advertising and public relations layout.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Digital Communication
CMMN A265 Photography
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course covers the technical skills and the aesthetic understanding needed to produce quality photographs with a digital still camera. Emphasis is given to the composition and content of photographs during regular lab and critique sessions. The course also explores the significance of photography in both historical and contemporary contexts.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN A266 Videography
Credit Hours:
3.00

Videography builds skills in visual storytelling. Students work with digital video cameras to shoot, write and edit video news stories including several video news packages, one of which must focus on a social justice topic.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Digital Communication
CMMN A291 Internship
Credit Hours:
3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience. May be repeated for credit when workplace varies.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore, Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A310 Advertising
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an introduction to the field of advertising with attention given to market planning, message strategies, media planning, and advertising’s impact on society.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing
CMMN A313 Media Planning
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on the study of media planning and research as it relates to the overall advertising and marketing process. Specific areas covered include media terminology, advertising and media research, selection and evaluation of media, and media resources.

Prerequisite(s): Advertising
CMMN A316 Public Relations
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course concerns the development of contemporary public relations practices with emphasis on solving communications problems within organizations and institutions by applying appropriate theories and techniques.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing
CMMN A326 Research for Advertising and Public Relations
Credit Hours:
3.00

Introduction to applied quantitative and qualitative research methods in advertising/public relations campaign development, management, and evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): Advertising, Public Relations Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CMMN A334 Strategic Problem Solving for Ad and Public Relations
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on strategic planning and management of advertising and public relations cases in business, government, education, or community.

Prerequisite(s): Advertising, Public Relations Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CMMN A335 Strategic Event Planning and Promotions
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course looks at events in terms of relationship building within the context of public relations events and functions. It develops events as a means of strategic communication. Students will analyze case histories, plan and execute events.

Prerequisite(s): Advertising, Public Relations Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CMMN A336 Strategic Content Creation I
Credit Hours:
3.00

Introduction to strategic writing using informative and persuasive methods to create messages for print, digital, interactive, mobile and web-based media.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Advertising, Public Relations Any of the prerequisites are accepted
CMMN A337 Strategic Content Creation II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This strategic writing practicum is a continuation of CMMN A336, Strategic Content Creation I and applies the theories, skills and practices therein. This course provides instruction to hone and polish your informative and persuasive writing skills to create messages for a service-learning community partner. Students will create advertising and public relations materials for print, digital, interactive, mobile and web-based media that will achieve the community partner’s organization objectives.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Strategic Content Creation I
CMMN A350 Advanced Journalism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course centers on advanced reporting techniques including computer assisted reporting, advanced writing and visual storytelling for multimedia platforms including print, radio and television.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Videography
CMMN A351 Advanced Editing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced course in editing with emphasis on developing technical proficiency through a full understanding of theoretical concepts.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): News Editing Junior
CMMN A352 Interpretive Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

Types of interpretive journalism will be discussed, including editorials, columns, art, reviews, etc.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing
CMMN A354 Feature Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a course in writing features for print and electronic media, with stress on the development of descriptive writing and individual style.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing
CMMN A355 Covering the Courts
Credit Hours:
3.00

The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of the role of the journalist in covering the courts and to enhance the ability to cover the judicial process in a responsible and professional manner.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing
CMMN A356 Sports Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course details how to report various sports news from high school to college to professional sports. This is a practical, writing intensive course where students will be assigned to cover sporting events.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN A357 Sports Promotions
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the promotions and marketing of sports as related to advertising, public relations and the media. Students study the marketing of sports products, increasing media audiences and live attendance as well as the selling of sports related products.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN A359 Advanced Journalism Lab
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course gives the student practical experience in reporting and writing with academic evaluation. Campus news coverage and beats are assigned for use on The Maroon, the university student newspaper.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Journalism One other journalism course required
CMMN A360 Advanced Layout and Design
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course concerns creative design applications, designing with grid, contemporary advertising layouts, brochure and folder production, logo and symbol design, posters and billboards, and direct advertising, including the use of desktop publishing and various graphics communications computer applications in production.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Layout and Design
CMMN A368 Photojournalism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the field of photojournalism with regular photographic assignments. A historical survey of the field and ethical and legal considerations will be examined.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Digital Communication, Photography
CMMN A369 Documentary Photography
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced photography course in which each student will complete an in-depth documentary photography project. The history of documentary photography will be studied.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Digital Communication, Photography
CMMN A371 Covering the Environmental Beat
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course presents an application of the elements of news coverage of environmental issues. Includes discussion of a variety of complex environmental challenges and provides the opportunity to explore disparate points of view. Students will use and sharpen their reporting and writing skills and analyze complex and many-sided issues.

Prerequisite(s): Journalism
CMMN A380 Current Trends
Credit Hours:
3.00

Each offering of the course is different, since the content of the course is based on current issues and developments within the media. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. The 300-level focuses on media skills.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A380 Donnelley Center
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students work in the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Nonprofit Communications, a student-run agency that gives students real-world experience in public relations, design, photography and videography, social media, advertising, event and strategic planning by working with nonprofits to create communication solutions.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
CMMN A380 Travel Journalism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provide an introduction to travel journalism: what it is; what it can be and what it may evolve into in an era of mobile media. Students learn to convey the essence of place through nonfiction writing.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A380 Tropical Communications
Credit Hours:
3.00

An overview of the ecology of tropical ecosystems coupled with approaches to covering issues especially pertinent to the tropics, followed by two weeks in the field in a tropical country studying the plants and animals in several different ecological zones: coral reefs, pine savannah, rain forest, mangrove swamps.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A382 Social Media Strategies
Credit Hours:
3.00

Exploration of current and common social media platforms with an emphasis on practical application. This is a results- and production-orientated class focused on communication strategies, content creation and successful outcomes.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN A384 Brand Lab
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students work in the Brand Lab, a student-run agency that gives students real-world experience in public relations, design, photography and videography, social media, advertising, event and strategic planning by working with for-profit companies to create communication solutions.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN A400 Mass Communication Theory and Research
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced course tracing development of mass communications research from its origins to work recently published in academic journals. Students will be introduced to research methods and participate in one or more research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing Junior
CMMN A401 Law of Mass Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an examination of major legal and regulatory developments in mass media. There is an emphasis on both legal and ethical concepts.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Writing Junior, Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A410 Nonprofit Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

An analysis of the nonprofit and public sector industry and integrated communications within these organizations. Students study organizational typologies and classifications, social and ethical issues, theories of public vs. private and how these affect message, publics, and media issues. The course includes classic and contemporary readings.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A415 Advanced Advertising Campaigns
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course exposes students to the experience of working on a major national advertising account in an advertising agency environment. Each student should leave this course with portfolio material and hands-on experience in the field of advertising. Offered in the spring semester only.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
CMMN A419 Advanced Public Relations Campaigns
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course gives students the opportunity to create and implement a campaign for a national public relations client in a public relations agency environment. Students experiment with various research, planning, and writing processes introduced in courses required by the public relations sequence. Offered in the spring semester only.

$75 fee for non-majors and part-time students.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
CMMN A450 History of Journalism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the development of American journalism from the colonial period to the present.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A451 Media and American Courts
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course helps students develop an understanding of free press/fair trial issues (including historical perspective, significant people, current controversies and academic research) as well as an appreciation of award-winning coverage of the judicial system.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A455 Media and Gender
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the impact of media’s gender images on individuals, society, and culture. Participants will learn to be more critical consumers of media messages, specifically in terms of gender representations, to think and to write critically about their responses to and use of media products, and to develop different perspectives to interpret pop culture and media messages.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A465 History of Photography
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a history of photography from its invention to the present. Attention is given to the aesthetic criteria and the historical context of photographic work, as well as to the ways photographs have been used from the era of the daguerreotype to the computer-based image.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A471 Mass Communication Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an advanced course focusing on one specific author or school of thought or genre in the existing mass communication literature. Strong emphasis is placed on reading and class discussion.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A473 International Media Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of the media of other countries. Comparisons in values, patronage bases, freedom of expression, and similar concerns are the heart of the course.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A474 Ethics of Mass Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the moral principles that order the work of the communications professional, the social responsibility of mass media institutions and the individual responsibilities of the practitioners.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A475 Environmental Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

Presents an overview of how environmental information is expressed in mass communications and associated theory of the field. Important environmental theory and issues will be discussed. Students use and sharpen their writing skills, learn how to evaluate scientific information, and study issues with conflicting data.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A480 Current Trends
Credit Hours:
3.00

Each offering of the course is different, since the content of the course is based on current issues and developments within the media. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. The 400-level is a theories-related subject matter.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
CMMN A482 Advanced Social Media Strategies
Credit Hours:
3.00

Exploration of current common social media platforms with an emphasis on application, analysis and the development of multi-faceted strategic communications plans. The course is designed to foster an understanding of the distinctions between common social media platforms and analysis, presentation and understanding of relevant data to inform business success.

Prerequisite(s): Social Media Strategies
CMMN A484 Seminar in Mass Communications Ethics and Diversity
Credit Hours:
1.00

This course examines the moral principles that order the work of the communications professional with an emphasis on case discussion.

Prerequisite(s): Senior, Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A485 Strategic Communication Capstone
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is the culmination of the strategic communication curriculum and brings together all of the elements learned in the prerequisite courses, including strategic planning, media relations and planning, strategic content creation, primary and secondary research, and much more. This course will specifically cover research and development of a total strategic communications campaign, client relations, time management, evaluation and professional presentation skills. As near as possible, this course will expose the student to the experience of working on a major communications account in an agency environment. Each student should leave this course with portfolio material and hands-on experience in the field of strategic communications.

Prerequisite(s): Research for Advertising and Public Relations, Strategic Problem Solving for Ad and Public Relations, Strategic Content Creation II
CMMN A490 Journalism Capstone
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is the culmination of coursework in the journalism sequence. Students will use all their research, writing, reporting, electronic and social media skills for professional distribution.

Prerequisite(s): Advanced Journalism
CMMN A492 Senior Seminar in Mass Communication
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course prepares students to enter the global mass communication industry and offers all the tools necessary as students begin searching for their first jobs. Students create resumes and portfolios for professional purposes and fine-tune their job hunting and leadership skills.

Prerequisite(s): Senior, Required for Mass Communication majors
CMMN A493 Internship II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a second or third internship with supervised practical experience. May be repeated for credit when workplace varies

Prerequisite(s): Internship
CMMN A495 Special Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research. A formal proposal is required in which the student clearly sets forth what he/she proposes to do. A reminder: the average three-hour course is supposed to account for 145 hours over the semester.

 

Prerequisite(s): Special arrangements required
CMMN A496 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

Prerequisite(s): Special arrangements required
CMMN A497 Internship
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience.

Prerequisite(s): Special arrangements required
CMMN A498 Research Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This course focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. A formal proposal is required in which the student clearly sets forth what he/she proposes to do. A reminder: the average three-hour course is supposed to account for 145 hours over the semester.

Prerequisite(s): Special arrangements required
CMMN A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A formal proposal is required in which the student clearly sets forth what he/she proposes to do. A reminder: the average three-hour course is supposed to account for 145 hours over the semester.

Prerequisite(s): Special arrangements required
CMMN O202 Game as Art
Credit Hours:
3.00

Loyola Core - Knowledge & Values: Creative Arts & Cultures

This course teaches students how to understand, examine, and critically analyze digital media and digital games as aesthetic objects. The course places digital games in a historical context of other games and sports and examines how previous forms of play are influenced by digital media.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN T121 First-Year Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

Loyola Core - Foundations

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. First-Year Seminars at Loyola are small, discussion-based seminars that introduce new college students to academic inquiry at the university level by investigating a relevant topic. Specially-trained faculty lead these seminars in a way that instills in students the academic skills necessary to become successful Loyola students. Course titles may differ from section to section based on the instructor's focus for the course..

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN X236 Understanding Media
Credit Hours:
3.00

Advanced Common Curriculum & Loyola Core Knowledge & Values: Social Science

This is an examination of the different mass media, with special attention to their historical and technological development; to the economic aspects of mass communication including media conglomerates and cross-media ownership; to the theories of communication; to the collection and dissemination of news; and to the international aspects of communication.

This course satisfies an Advanced Common Curriculum Behavior/Social Science Modern requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013.

Prerequisite(s):
CMMN X237 Media Play
Credit Hours:
3.00

Advanced Common Curriculum & Loyola Core Knowledge & Values: Social Science

This course examines the aesthetics of media use, with special emphasis given to interactive experiences with digital media. Students examine classic and contemporary theories of media, cognition, and social behavior to better understand play and entertainment within a mass-mediated society.

This course satisfies an Advanced Common Curriculum Behavior/Social Science modern requirement for students who began their program of study before fall semester 2013.

Prerequisite(s):

Computer Science (COSC)

COSC A208 Information Systems Theory & Practice
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides an understanding of information systems and outlines the concepts of how IS can provide for competitive advantage. Different systems are presented. Design and implementation are discussed. Effect on business and society is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A211 Introduction to Programming I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to concepts and terminology in computer programming. Topics include interface builders and problem solving techniques in various programming environments. Emphasis is placed on the basics of software design and on elementary applications to Mathematics and other disciplines.

Prerequisite(s): Math Models, Introduction to Finite Mathematics A higher level math course is accepted
COSC A212 Introduction to Programming II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation of COSC A211. Topics include object-oriented programming, software development, and data structures such as stacks, queues, trees, lists and the further exploration of the applications of programming to Mathematics and other disciplines.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Programming I
COSC A217 Object-Oriented Programming
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers an introduction to object-oriented software design techniques and to problem-solving methods. Particular focus is on the object-oriented paradigm. Procedural abstractions, data abstraction, and complex data structures are covered within the OO paradigm. Students also examine the major phases of software development and design.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A241 Computing Ethics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course mixes ethical theory with case study analysis to introduce students to ethics questions and theories that can help them to make ethically sound decisions in their professional, personal, and social experiences with computing. Starting with a few motivating current events, the course covers major ethical perspectives, and then introduces key ethical issues related to networked communications, intellectual property, information privacy, computer and network security, computer and software reliability, professional ethics, and workplace fairness, health, and the impacts of job automation.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A242 Introduction to Cybersecurity
Credit Hours:
3.00

A broad survey course intended for undergraduate students in any major: Students are provided with a road map for approaching this field from multiple standpoints—computer science, business administration, criminal justice, or other disciplines. Students learn the mechanisms needed to ensure the fundamentals of information security. The course will present security for personal systems, enterprise systems, and internet use. Students learn to delineate the many different types of threats and vulnerabilities, and to characterize noteworthy recent failures in information security.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A243 Corporate Cybersecurity Strategy
Credit Hours:
3.00

Cybersecurity is as much a set of human practices as technical ones. Responsible handling of information assets—let alone ethical handling—demands a consistent approach whether an organization is a transnational corporation or a sole proprietorship. This course teaches students to implement security policies to support organizational goals. We discuss methodologies for identifying, quantifying, mitigating, and controlling security risks, as well as disaster recovery. Student also learn about laws, regulations, and standards relating to information security and privacy, and how they affect IT organizations.

 

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A270 Introduction to Relational Databases
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the concepts and terminology of databases. The concepts discussed during the lectures are illustrated by a number of hands-on exercises based on the Microsoft Access database software.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A280 Introduction to Computer Graphics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course familiarizes students with basic aspects of computer graphics: Topics include Java 2D fundamentals, geometry, painting, stroking, interactivity, color theory, animation, and affine transforms.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
COSC A315 Computer Organization
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the topics of digital logic, digital systems, machine level representation of data, assembly level machine organization, memory system organization, I/O, and communication.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
COSC A317 Data Structures
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers the basics of data structures, such as abstract data types, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Applications to a number of problems, both practical and theoretical, are studied,  including sorting, searching, and changing from recursion to iteration.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
COSC A319 Internet Technologies
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the concepts and technologies that are used in modern Internet systems, and provides the necessary skills and knowledge of software technologies needed for creating Internet/Web services. It is designed to expose students to web content presentation and generation technologies, programming, and building multi-tiered client/server web applications.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
COSC A341 Ethical Hacking - Penetration Testing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a hands-on lab in “ethical hacking” and other forms of penetration testing for the purpose of finding and resolving vulnerabilities in computer systems and networks.  The course is founded on absorbing the Mitre ATT&CK framework as a means of understanding adversarial behavior.  Students perform penetration tests on specially configured target systems, which may include externally-managed cyber-ranges. Students also participate in bug bounties, and learn how to articulate and practice responsible disclosure of cybersecurity vulnerabilities.  Upon completion, students will be prepared for the Certified Ethical Hacker qualification test.

Prerequisite(s): Operating Systems
COSC A342 Digital Forensics
Credit Hours:
3.00

The increasing dependence in everyday life on computer information systems has led to a corresponding increase in criminal activity through and against such systems. In addition, benign use of information systems has grown to the extent that such systems are now routinely part of discovery in civil and criminal legal proceedings. In this course, students will learn the techniques of digital forensics that are used to investigate cybersecurity incidents, legal disputes, and crimes. We will develop approaches that can be used on desktop personal computers and servers. The course will also emphasize the importance of controls and verification of digital evidence and the critical necessity of preserving and documenting a chain of custody for that evidence.

Prerequisite(s): Operating Systems
COSC A361 Languages and Paradigms
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of languages and paradigms. Topics include parameters, data types, abstract data types, storage issues, static/dynamic attributes, and software abstractions. Emphasis is on the procedural paradigm with introduction and comparison to the object-oriented paradigm, the logic paradigm, and other paradigms.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
COSC A365 Operating Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

Topics include an introduction to operating systems; process, memory, and storage management; protection and security; distributed systems; and case studies.

Prerequisite(s): Data Structures Sophomore
COSC A405 Artificial Intelligence
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course teaches the fundamentals of artificial intelligence, including problem solving techniques, search, heuristic methods, and knowledge representation. Topics include ALL programming, expert systems, and an introduction to natural language processing.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
Corequisite(s):
COSC A406 Machine Learning
Credit Hours:
3.00

Machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. Topics include effective machine learning techniques, implementation, and the theoretical underpinnings of learning and AI.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Programming II Sophomore
COSC A425 Computer Graphics
Credit Hours:
3.00

Topics include review of vector analysis and matrices; 3D wireframe pipeline framework; window to viewport transform; clipping algorithms; matrix description of 2D and 3D transforms; projections and perspective transforms; view transform; and some concepts in computational geometry.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Computer Graphics
COSC A426 Game Programming
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is for individuals interested in becoming a game programmer, game designer, or game artist. Students learn how to make video games using the industry tools and practices of game development. The course takes students from intermediate programmers to designers of stunning 3D games. By the end of the course, students will have completed multiple hands-on projects and will be able to leverage an array of game development techniques to design and create their own video games.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Programming II
COSC A430 Database Management Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is concerned with the internals and externals of database management systems, as well as data modeling techniques. Topics include features of database management systems (DBMS) and database users; data modeling; relational data models and languages; constraints and triggers; system aspects; object-oriented databases; logical query languages; data storage; query processing and optimization; transaction processing and concurrency control; and information integration.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Relational Databases Sophomore
COSC A441 Cryptography and Its Applications
Credit Hours:
3.00

Cryptography is a science of unpredictability and unintelligibility—hiding information in ways an adversary can neither anticipate nor discover. In this course, we will cover the various forms of cryptography: Symmetric, asymmetric, and one-way cryptography and review algorithms of each form. The course will address the use of cryptography in information security, not only for confidentiality, but also for data integrity. We will explore the mathematical principles behind deriving cryptographic algorithms and those behind validating them, including secure random-number generation. The course will present the applications of cryptography from the block ciphers of antiquity through the incipient field of quantum cryptography. The course will also focus on public-key infrastructure and blockchain/distributed ledger as important implementations of cryptography.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Programming II, Introduction to Linear Algebra, Introduction to Probability and Statistics I
COSC A451 Software Engineering
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course describes engineering processes and their application to the development of software.

Prerequisite(s): Data Structures Sophomore
COSC A471 Communication and Network Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the fundamental issues in computer networking. The course is intended to provide students with knowledge and understanding of basic concepts in networks and protocols. Frequently used protocols are used to illustrate the concepts and to provide insight into practical networks.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore
COSC A493 Special Topics in Computer Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students demonstrate the ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer sciences theory in the modeling and design of computer-based programming. Emphasis is on one or more of the theoretical aspects of computer science.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A495 Special Project in Computer Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. Students demonstrate the ability to use current skills and tools necessary for the application of computing practice.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A496 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort. Credits vary.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A497 Practicum/Internship II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This experience is planned and arranged in conjunction with the student's major advisor. Students gain practical computing experience on projects outside a regular classroom setting. 

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A498 Research Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Research projects focus on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. Credits vary.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Students work with a faculty member on a topic of their choosing. Credits vary.

Prerequisite(s):
COSC Y200 The World Wide Web and Scripts
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Natural Science in Context

This course introduces students to the World Wide Web from the point of view of a user who surfs the Web, as well as from the point of view of an author who develops websites on the Internet. It describes web standards, networking protocols, and the latest development in various markup languages, such as HTML and XHTML. Students learn to create their own static web pages in part one, using features available from the markup languages. In part two, students use the knowledge learned in part one to incorporate dynamic content into their web pages, and learn to turn their information-only web pages into an interactive, goal-oriented website.

Prerequisite(s):

Counseling (CNSL)

CNSL A702 Research and Statistical Methods in Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines research designs and concepts commonly used in the social and behavioral sciences. The course also covers parametric statistics related to univariate and bivariate statistics; students will learn to calculate these statistics both by hand and through SPSS and interpret the results. 

Prerequisite(s):
Corequisite(s):
CNSL A704 Research Writing Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This one hour lab requirement offers development of graduate level research writing skills including APA format through the production of a manuscript. Students will be provided detailed instruction in APA writing format and writing philosophy.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A706 Philosophy and Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides philosophical inquiry into human relationships and the importance of interpersonal process in the practice of counseling.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A725 Lifespan Development
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, instructors offer an advanced study of human development from conception to death. Students will learn about the human experience from a social, emotional, cognitive, learning, neurological, physiological perspective. Topics include developmental theory, unique therapeutic issues across the lifespan, and matching interventions to developmental stage. Relevant cultural and ethical intersections with lifespan development and differential interventions are explored.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A776 Clinical Assessment and Psychometrics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers clinical interviewing skills common to completing a biopsychosocial assessment as well as basic and intermediate psychometric analyse. This course covers proper instrument usage related to administering, scoring, and interpretation procedures.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A830 Counseling Theories
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a study of selected counseling theories as they relate to personality, symptom development and therapeutic change. This course will examine the application of counseling theories in clinical practice.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A835 Introduction to Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of counseling principles, practices, and techniques. In this course, students learn the foundational relationship micro-skills used in counseling. Students are introduced to the basics of ethics, diversity, theory, and philosophy in creating a counseling relationship.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A836 Individual Counseling Skills Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

In this course, students develop clinical skills by providing a series of weekly 50 minute counseling sessions to trained actors who will serve as clients. The departmental laboratory includes digital video recordings in order to code counseling micro-skills for concrete and specific learner feedback. Students will meet in small groups with the instructor to review videos throughout the semester. Making and analyzing these digital recordings will efficiently improve clinical skills and provide preparation for the challenge of working with “real” clients in practicum and internship. This lab requirement is taken simultaneously with CNSL A835 Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling under guidance of the same instructor. 

$100 Lab fee.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A837 Child Counseling: Play Therapy
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, the instructor explores the range of clinical and school based approaches used by mental health professionals to help children. This course is an introduction to play therapy, and includes an onsite micro-practicum experience. Topics will include play therapy history, child centered play therapy and introduction to theory, developing a therapeutic relationship with a child, child specific needs, diversity awareness and adaptions, micro-skills, therapeutic limit setting, and fostering involvement with the caregivers(s).

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A840 Group Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers an experiential investigation of group process theory as it pertains to counseling practice.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Counseling, Individual Counseling Skills Lab
CNSL A841 Career Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of history, theories, research, and techniques of career counseling.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A842 Multicultural Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course addresses the similarities and differences among various culturally diverse groups, and informs counselors of the characteristics and processes necessary to become a culturally skilled counselor. Special emphasis will explore the intersection of cultural identity as it relates to systemic forms of oppression.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A843 Group Counseling Skills Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This one hour laboratory is required of all students enrolled in CNSL A840 Group Counseling, and develops clinical group skills by providing a series of weekly 45-minute counseling sessions to a group of trained actors who will serve as clients. The departmental laboratory includes digital video recording equipment and software that makes it possible for students to code and catalog each group counseling sessions. This technology allows more precise study of group counseling sessions and accurate charting of progress over time. Making and analyzing these digital recordings will efficiently improve group counseling skills and provides preparation for the challenge of working with “real” groups in practicum and internship. This lab requirement is taken simultaneously with CNSL A840 Group Counseling.

$150 lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Counseling, Individual Counseling Skills Lab
Corequisite(s):
CNSL A845 Addiction Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the issues associated with counseling clients with issues of substance use and abuse. In this course, we focus on the systemic interventions of individuals with addiction issues, and the importance of treating the whole family. Course content includes historical foundations of addiction, psychological and physiological effects of commonly abused substances, various theoretical etiologies of abuse, and an overview of multiple treatment strategies for individuals (adults and adolescents), couples, families and groups.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A848 Play Therapy Theories
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed as an advanced play therapy course using both didactic and dynamic components of knowledge acquisition of skill competencies in play therapy as a therapeutic intervention for children, adolescents, and families. Students become capable of articulating: theoretical conceptualizations of child clients; stages of therapy according to a variety of theories as applicable to child clients; ethical, cultural, and diversity issues; diagnostic possibilities; and treatment plans. Additionally, an advanced micro-practicum experience is included in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Child Counseling: Play Therapy
CNSL A849 Activity Group Therapy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed to assist people who work with children, pre-adolescents, and adolescents in obtaining an understanding of the philosophy and rational for group work with child populations, as well as the use of expressive arts with diverse people of all ages across the lifespan, as a therapeutic modality. This course focuses on the goals of group play/ activity therapy, the role of the play therapist, screening and selection of group members, and planning and structuring of sessions. The course is designed to be both experiential and didactic and a micro-practicum experience is usually required. 

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A850 Introduction to Family Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the family systems theory and presents research on the family as an open system that functions in relation to its broader sociocultural context and that evolves over the life cycle. Various techniques of family counseling are covered as well as the ethical considerations of such a model.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A851 School Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides the theoretical and philosophical foundation and structural paradigm that forms the focus of school counseling. Practical information about programs, practices, resources, and research pertinent to the field of school counseling is intertwined with practical experiences. Cognitive learning through reading and research pertains to the history and evolution of school counseling, the role of the school counselor, comprehensive guidance programs, and program evaluation. This course develops the necessary knowledge to work at all levels of school counseling (elementary, middle, and secondary).

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A852 Marriage and Couples Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

After successful completion of this course students will have: a clinical, theoretical and personal knowledge of basic couples counseling techniques, a personal understanding of the dynamics common to couples, an effective way to assess the overall health of a couple, a set of clinical skills that honor the inherent difficulties of providing counseling services to a couple instead of an individual, experience conducting sample Tandem Couples Counseling therapy, and methods for managing a range of events that can seriously threaten the survival of the relationship.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A853 Child/Parent Relationship Therapy
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, students learn about the dynamic of the parent child relationship and how to work with parents and children in therapy. Students will learn how to navigate parent consults in play therapy, how to introduce, utilize and create filial therapy with parents, individuals and in groups, how to intervene in the parent/child relationship in a positive way, how to assess a problem in the parent child relationship, incorporating the family into child parent relationship therapy, and facilitating compassion for parents of diverse backgrounds.  Additionally, the course will help students be familiar with a variety of parenting education interventions. Volunteer parents are brought in to participate in an 8-week parenting education course, taught by the instructor and students, as part of this course. 

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A855 Diagnostics in Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive review of all psychological disorders as contained in the DSM-5.

Prerequisite(s): Philosophy and Counseling, Counseling Theories, Introduction to Counseling, Individual Counseling Skills Lab, Clinical Assessment and Psychometrics
CNSL A856 Clinical Thanatology: Death and Dying
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students will review the latest theoretical and empirical literature related to death and dying, grief and loss, and grief counseling strategies. This experiential run seminar-style course will use a holistic perspective to understand how people experience grief, loss, and the dying process. Students will learn about their own grieving process and learn counseling strategies they can use in the respective fields. 

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A857 Psychopathology in Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

The purpose of this course is to synthesize the content of neurology, trauma theory, and psychopharmacology as etiological and treatment factors as they relate to psychological disorders in the DSM-5. 

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A858 Scholarship in Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students will engage in a scholarship project based on a topic of interest to them that will result in a publishable manuscript for a peer-reviewed journal and also construct a presentation proposal(s) (based upon the manuscript) for a professional conference(s).

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A862 Family Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course students immerse themselves in Family Systems theory by learning the basic concepts and then understanding them as they relate to their own family and life experiences. Students will see that their efforts will be rewarded with a richer and more complete understanding of themselves, those with whom they relate, and clinically useful patterns of interaction will flow from their understanding of the concepts that Family Systems Theory is based upon.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A863 Fundamentals of Practicum and Internship
Credit Hours:
3.00

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the necessary tools to begin their clinical experience. In other courses students review Theory, Practice, Diagnosis, Ethics, Group Counseling and Research and practice translating what they’ve learned in previous classed into practice. This course will provide students with the knowledge of how to handle day to day activities in their Practicum and Internship setting such as documentation, Client Fees, Agency Policies, Supervision, etc. as they work with client actors in an agency-like setting.

Prerequisite(s): Research and Statistical Methods in Counseling, Research Writing Lab, Philosophy and Counseling, Counseling Theories, Introduction to Counseling, Individual Counseling Skills Lab, Ethics in Individual, Marriage, and Family Counseling, Group Counseling, Group Counseling Skills Lab
CNSL A864 Ethics in Individual, Marriage, and Family Counseling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines ethical standards of practice as outlined by the American Counseling Association and the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Students are introduced to the process of ethical decision-making and common ethical dilemmas facing mental health practitioners.

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A866 Counseling Internship
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers a supervised field experience in counseling for 20 hours a week in an off campus service learning site. Students will complete six credit hours of internship over multiple semesters until they complete the 600 hours of field experience. 

Prerequisite(s): Counseling Practicum
CNSL A895 Special Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Arranged in consultation with advisor. 

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A896 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Arranged in consultation with advisor. 

Prerequisite(s):
CNSL A898 Research Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Arranged in consultation with advisor.

Prerequisite(s):

Criminology & Justice (CRIM)

CRIM A101 Introduction to Law Enforcement
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the philosophical and historical background of law enforcement. The principles of organization and administration for functions and activities; planning and research; public relations; personnel and training; inspection and control; direction; and policy formation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A105 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the student to how the justice system works in America. It begins with a discussion of the underlying rationale for punishment of crime and then addresses all components of the criminal justice system including law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections. Topics discussed include police, role of the attorney, bail, criminal trial, sentencing, corrections, and post-conviction remedies.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A110 Criminology: Fundamentals
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of basic topics and problems related to the discipline of criminology, such as the nature of crime in America and other countries crime statistics, and selected criminological theories. It serves as an introduction to the systematic study of crime, criminals, criminal behavior, and the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A120 Introduction to Homeland Security
Credit Hours:
3.00

The organization and operation of United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is examined in detail covering major topics related to homeland security including a history and organization of DHS, a review of key legislation, laws, and directives, introduction to basic concepts of infrastructure protection, risk management, threat assessment and prioritization, jurisdiction and coordination between agencies (public and private agency interface, military and emergency agencies), and issues in communication and technical areas such as interconnectivity and interoperability.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A205 Police Supervision
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines supervisory methods and problems within the law enforcement organization and the implication of principles of human relations to effective performance, policy and procedure, field supervision, instruction and planning, supervisory reporting, and performance evaluation.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A210 Police Administration
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines individual and group studies in the dynamics of law enforcement and administration, policy formation and decision making in management from a human relations and organizational point of view.  New paradigms of police organization and management are reviewed.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A213 Police Community Relations
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines factors contributing to friction or cooperation between law enforcement personnel and the community, with emphasis on ethnic and minority groups, political pressures, and cultural problems. Community organization and social responsibility of law enforcement is also discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A218 Criminal Procedure
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of the formal process whereby the government seeks to convict and punish a person for a criminal offense. Special emphasis will be placed on appellate review, the law of search and seizure, interrogations, confessions, the use of informers and entrapment, pretrial procedures, and various doctrines applying the fourteenth amendment.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A250 Juvenile Delinquency
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the nature and causes of juvenile crime and delinquency in America and other cultures. An in-depth analysis of crime measurement, causes, controls, and treatment are examined. Other topics include juvenile law, corrections, family therapy, gangs, schools, and the influence of the mass media on juvenile crime and delinquency.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A255 Juvenile Justice Process
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines of the major decisions made about juveniles from initial contact by the police through termination of legal control over their conduct. Constitutional limitations on the power of the juvenile justice process as a result of recent Supreme Court decisions, case law developments, and statutory changes will be reviewed.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A260 Statistics in Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines descriptive, inferential and multivariate statistics employed in criminology and criminal justice research about the nature of crimes, criminals, and the criminal justice system. Statistical packages such as SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) are employed in the course to aid students in the calculation and interpretation of key statistical techniques commonly employed in the field.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A262 Statistics in Criminal Justice Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This lab is a co-requisite for CRIM A260 Statistics in Criminal Justice and provides an opportunity to apply the skills learned in the class. The lab focuses on the identification of statistical techniques in the criminological and criminal justice literature, explanation for the use of specific techniques and interpretation of quantitative results.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A270 Murder, Mayhem, and the Media
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course explores the relationship of the mass media to our perception of crime, criminals, and the criminal justice system. The mass media generate a "social construction of reality" that influences public opinion, public policies, and general social attitudes toward violence. The print and electronic media, including the internet, are examined as purveyors of social perceptions of criminals, victims, law enforcers, lawyers, judges, prisoners, and the like.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A275 Deviant Behavior
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course critically examines the nature and extent of deviant behavior in complex, industrial societies. Particular attention will be given to the causes and consequences of deviant behavior and to the social relations and processes associated with the more common forms of deviant and criminal expression within America and other societies.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A280 Domestic Violence
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines the dynamics of violent relationships, theories of domestic violence, and reactions to domestic violence by the family, media, community and, more extensively, the criminal justice system. Although the course will be focused on intimate partner violence, special topics will also be covered including elder abuse, sexual assault, same sex partner violence, victimization in minority and immigrant populations, stalking, and lethal intimate partner violence.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A285 Crisis Intervention
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a discussion and analysis of crisis intervention as a therapeutic tool in community mental health. Emphasis will be on suicide, crisis lines, counseling, and managing hostile interactions.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A288 Crime and Disaster
Credit Hours:
3.00

Disaster events cause sudden disruption to a community. There is growing evidence that people may engage in what we call anti-social behavior. Therefore, we need to consider what we can do to better understand when and where these behaviors may occur, and how we can prevent crime after disaster. We will begin by interrogating what the definition of a disaster event is, as this is not an agree upon concept in the multidisciplinary field. We will also study how the different phases of disaster relate to criminal activity in the disaster context. We will investigate a number of case studies from the perspectives of sociologists, criminologists, and law enforcement officials who have had direct experience researching and working in disaster situations. Then, we will examine specific criminal activity, such as looting, sexual assault, fraud, the illegal drug market, and hate crimes. Finally, we will look at how the criminal justice system responds to crime in the wake of disaster.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A300 Research Methods– Criminology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on research in the fields of criminology and criminal justice and includes developing a theoretical explanation for why problems exist, techniques of literature review, methodological designs, collecting information that will verify or refute the explanation of problems, and then analyzing, presenting and interpreting this information. Specific techniques for data collection, analysis, and presentation will be covered in the course.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A302 Research Methods in Criminology Lab
Credit Hours:
1.00

This lab is a co-requisite for CRIM A300 Research Methods in Criminology and provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge from class. The lab focuses on the description of and explanation for methodological approaches in the criminological and criminal justice literature, as well as on identification of strengths, weaknesses and alternative techniques. 

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A310 Community Policing
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines community-oriented policing, which represents a significant departure from the traditional, centralized model of policing. Topics covered include the growth of networking, online crime reporting, crime mapping, the development of the COMPSTAT process, the development of intranets within police organizations, police web pages, e-commerce transactions, and the opening of doors to new levels of police-citizen communications.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A313 Criminal Evidence
Credit Hours:
3.00

Rules of evidence are examined including examination of witnesses, impeachment, and circumstantial evidence. Special emphasis will be given to relevancy, hearsay and its exceptions, privileges, presumptions and inferences, burden of proof, judicial notice, and the parole evidence rule.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A320 Violent Offenders
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on the violent offender in which physical injury is inflicted against one or more others, including, but not limited to criminal homicide, aggravated assault, forcible rape, armed robbery, or attempts to inflict other physical injuries. Typologies of violent offenders are reviewed examining such factors as motives, facilitation and situational aspects of the crime, selection of victims, criminal careers, and group support for violent behavior.  Special types of violent offenders such as mass murderers, serial murderers, child murderers, and domestic murderers are also covered.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A325 Sex Offenses and Offenders
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a comprehensive overview of psychological, sociological and legal issues related to sex offenses. Additionally, the sexual offenses and different typologies of the sex offenders are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A330 Correctional Institutions
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines the theory and practice of correctional institutions and functions; the history of the prison as a total institution; types of correctional facilities; problems of rehabilitation in correctional institutions; crimes in prisons; adjusting to prison life; the inmate culture; and the future of correctional institutions.  The course includes tours of local and state correctional institutions.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A331 Probation and Parole
Credit Hours:
3.00

This class focuses on probation and parole, which is part of the criminal justice system. Topics include:   the history of probation and the courts, sentencing and the presentence investigation, community-based corrections, indeterminate sentences and punishment, rehabilitation, theory and practice, and probation and parole in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A335 Security and Crime Prevention
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course addresses the field of private security and crime prevention in such diverse environments as manufacturing, commerce, finance, healthcare, and government.  Private security missions include protection of persons, places, and things; loss prevention; private investigation; security assessment; and those services not provided by the public sector.  Issues such as education, training, industry-specific security guidelines, and advances in security technology are also addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A340 Environmental Criminology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines criminological solutions to environmental problems. Issues addressed include the nature of environmental offenders and victims, the political landscape of environmental law, the variety of approaches to achieving environmental justice, crimes against animals, the development of environmental radical groups, and criminal justice solutions to specific environmental problems.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A345 Seminar Constitutional Law
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course reviews basic constitutional law and in-depth analysis of Supreme Court decisions decided during recent terms of court with a special emphasis on trends in constitutional law and criminal procedure.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A350 Offenders With Mental Illness
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines deinstitutionalization, the effects of this process on people with mental illness, the ways the criminal justice system has met the challenge of offenders with mental illness, and the efficacy of programs and policies meant to reverse the trend of criminalization.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A355 Police Behavior
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course concerns history of the police; changing roles and public expectation of police officers; stress and the police; family life; and social behavior, police crime and deviance ; multi-cultural competency; and evidence based practices. 

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A365 Program Planning and Evaluation in Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines evaluation research, also called program or policy evaluation, which evaluates the impact of a social intervention such as a crime prevention and/or control program.  Key elements of this type of applied research including methodologies, data collection, and policy implications are reviewed using case studies.  Criminal justice evaluations are assessed including the techniques used to measure the effects of the program or policy against the goals it set out to accomplish, which allow policy makers to engage in subsequent decision-making and make improvements or adjustments.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A375 Organized Crime
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers the nature of organized crime; its history in America; the new forms it takes; theories explaining emergence, development, and persistence; and the unique problems law enforcement encounter in controlling organized crime. Definitions that capture the nature of organized crime as a unique type of criminal activity are discussed as well as new variations of organized crime such as the Russian Mafia and Trans-National Organized Crime.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A378 Cybercrime, Technology, and Social Change
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers crime, victimization, and criminality associated with the emerging technologies that mediate our social relationships, and the massive legal and societal changes as a result of the increased adoption of technologies by society.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A380 Ethics and Politics of Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides an overview of ethics and ethical dilemmas that criminal justice practitioners face in the course of their profession. Students are presented with the underlying rationales to understand these situations when they are encountered and the knowledge needed to properly resolve the issue. Ethical challenges are reviewed from both a historical and contemporary perspective, examining how the challenges were originally handled and if the same outcomes would occur today.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A385 Seminar in Advanced Criminology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Selected topics in the field of criminology are examined in depth through assigned readings and classroom discussion.  Subjects covered in past seminars include: (1) new developments in technology and law enforcement; (2) new directions in criminological theory; (3) fear and risk internationally; (4) experimental criminology; (5) disasters and crime facilitation; (6) immigration and crime; (7) crime mapping; (8) crime profiling; and (9) restorative justice.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A405 Criminal Law
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines criminal law, that class of societal norms defined by the political state as public wrongs and subject to adjudication in criminal courts, under state authority, as felonies or misdemeanors.  Subject matter includes sources of criminal law; theories of punishment; corpus delicti and basic elements of crime; specific offenses; principles of liability to punishment; and specific defenses to criminal behavior.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A410 Women and Crime
Credit Hours:
3.00

The study and practice of crime and criminal justice has historically neglected how women’s experiences as perpetrators and victims differ from males, and how these differences may affect policy and practice. Also neglected women’s experiences as professionals in the system and the acceptance of women as competent and effective, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, defenders, judges, and so on. The rate of female offending is growing more rapidly than certain rates of male offending, and women make up a large percentage of victims of crime, especially violent crime.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A420 Serial Murder: Myths vs. Realities
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course familiarizes students with the field of serial murder. Despite an almost mythical interest in the phenomenon, relatively few scientific studies have been undertaken on the prevalence, etiology, investigation, and understanding of the crime. Biological, psychological, and sociological explanations of serial murder are examined as well as key investigative techniques including psychological and geographical profiling.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A425 Seminar on Major Works in Criminology
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students are engaged to think critically and analytically by reading, understanding, and evaluating the original works of criminological scholars and exemplars; students will learn to appreciate the social and political and theoretical contexts that ‘situate’ key ideas that have shaped societies’ understanding of what crime is, the causes of crime, response to crime, and punishment of crime. Class discussions examine the impact of scholarly works on the fields of courts, policing, and corrections.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A430 Legal Research and Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course bridges the gap between essay style writing taught to undergraduates and the more technical writing of lawyers and other criminal justice professionals. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of legal research and writing to develop the skills necessary to prepare a legal memorandum and other technical tasks in the criminal justice professions. Prerequisite: COMP C119 or equivalent.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A480 Capstone
Credit Hours:
3.00

The capstone course, taken in the senior year, is designed to offer students the opportunity to complete an original research project in collaboration with or under the supervision of a faculty member, or to complete a substantial writing project designed to prepare the student to enter his/her field of choice. In addition, students perfect their resumes, participate in mock interviewing, and apply for jobs, as part of the requirement. The course is both writing and presentation intensive and is designed to prepare students to enter the job market and/or graduate school.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A497 Internship
Credit Hours:
4.00

The Criminology internship is an academic course offered to qualified students who want an experiential learning opportunity. The Internship allows selected students to engage full-time in an approved work environment where they can apply their knowledge of criminology/criminal justice to the actual daily activities of a professional criminal justice agency.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A700 Theories of Criminal Behavior
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers an intensive overview of the major paradigms and respective etiological theories of crime used in criminology and criminal justice. Classical and contemporary theories are reviewed including integrated theories crossing multiple paradigms. Linkages between theories of criminal behavior and current developments in crime control policies are explored.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A705 Seminar in Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3.00

Any of several different courses can be offered including security administration, premises liability and crime prevention, corrections, international terrorism, and deviant behavior.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A710 Research and Statistical Methods
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines research methods used in the social and behavioral sciences, including survey, field, and experimental research designs. Topics covered include sampling designs, reliability and validity of measures, scaling and index construction, the use of primary and secondary data, and data management. The most commonly used statistics in criminology and criminal justice are reviewed but will be covered in detail in CRIM A712 Graduate Statistics.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A712 Graduate Statistics I
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines descriptive, inferential, and multivariate statistics employed in criminal justice research regarding the nature of crimes, criminals, and the criminal justice system. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is employed in the course to aid students in the calculation and interpretation of key statistical techniques used in the field.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A718 Seminar in Criminal Justice Administration
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines criminal justice organizations in terms of management, organization, and leadership.  It explores making decisions, formulating goals, creating a mission, enacting policies and procedures, and uniting individuals in organizations so that these and other related tasks can be accomplished. Also discussed is the increasing pressures on criminal justice professionals to work within a global environment and in communities with heightened expectations. Adherence to ethical standards as the cornerstone of an organization is emphasized. Case studies are used in the course.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A720 Seminar in Criminal Justice Administration II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines topics in 21st century management and administration of criminal justice systems. A case approach examining topics such as new paradigms in policing, race, ethnicity, gender and justice, problem solving courts, community based programs, imprisonment and crime control, and justice administration since 9/11.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A800 Selected Problems in Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines current topics and issues related to the fields of criminology and criminal justice. Recent seminars have included the following topics: (1) mass incarceration and the future of corrections, (2) firearms and violence, (3) race, ethnicity, and justice, (4) wrongful convictions, (5) the changing nature of juvenile justice, (6) restorative justice as an alternative, (7) global human trafficking, and (8) socially marginalized groups, crime, and victimization.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A805 Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course employs the application of social science research methods and is used to supply scientifically valid information with which to develop and/or evaluate or assess a program or policy dealing with crime prevention and control. Topics include conceptual, methodological, bureaucratic, political, and organization factors in the evaluation process as well as specific program evaluation research techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A850 Seminar in Criminology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This seminar examines advanced subjects in the discipline of criminology including crime measurement and analysis, crime, criminal, and victim typologies, white collar crime, organized crime, corporate crime, human rights violations and crimes, cyber crime, political crime, etc.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A893 Directed Readings in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3.00

This seminar allows students to study specialized works in the field by reading and analyzing both classical and contemporary works.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM A900 Master’s Research and Practicum
Credit Hours:
3.00

This capstone course consists of directed research in criminal justice under the guidance of a graduate faculty member. The student must complete a practicum report demonstrating mastery of professional skills in one of the following:

1. Write a 5,000-to-10,000 word research paper written in a research journal format based on quantitative data.

2. Write a 5,000-to-10,000 word research paper written in a research journal format based on a comprehensive review of the literature; or,

3. Write an evaluation of a criminal justice policy or program; or,

4. Write an acceptable grant proposal following, for example, National Institute of Justice guidelines

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM T121 First-Year Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

Foundation Courses: First Year Seminar

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. First-Year Seminars at Loyola are small, discussion-based seminars that introduce new college students to academic inquiry at the university level by investigating a relevant topic. Specially-trained faculty lead these seminars in a way that instills in students the academic skills necessary to become successful Loyola students. Course titles may differ from section to section based on the instructor's focus for the course.

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM X282 Gangs and Criminal Networks
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

This course explores the extent of gang proliferation in the U.S. and abroad. Emphasis is on the dynamics of gang membership and the interactive social network relationship between gangs and the rest of society. Many variations of gangs and gang-like groups are discussed as well as individual, community, and criminological approaches for addressing gangs.

 

Prerequisite(s):
CRIM X320 Violence and Human Rights
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Social Science

This course provides a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the complexities, controversies, and issues surrounding two major social problems facing humanity: violence and human rights violations. Resting on the premise that the concepts of violence and human rights are not unrelated, this course not only examines the relationship between violence and human rights, but also engenders the idea that greater commitment to human rights is the most effective antidote to violence.

Prerequisite(s):

Dance (DANC)

DANC M111 Basic Ballet I
Credit Hours:
2.00

This course introduces the beginner student to a study of the basic principles of classical ballet according to the Russian ballet technique developed by Agrippina Vaganova. The use of French terminology and the proper alignment of the body through basic exercises at the barre and in the center are covered. Creditable twice.

Prerequisite(s):
DANC M211 Basic Ballet II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation of Basic Ballet I. It is offered to students who have had an introduction to the art of dance. Classes are based on the basic principles of classical ballet according to the Russian ballet technique developed by Agrippina Vaganova. The use of French terminology and the proper alignment of the body through basic exercises at the barre and in the center are covered. Creditable twice.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Ballet I or permission of instructor
DANC M250 Jazz Dance for Musicals
Credit Hours:
2.00

This course will teach jazz dance from a historical perspective. Contemporary jazz styles and Fosse repertory will result in jazz dance class performance during the semester.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Ballet I, Basic Ballet II, Intermediate Ballet Any of the prerequisites are accepted, or equivalent with permission of instructor
DANC M311 Intermediate Ballet
Credit Hours:
2.00

This course is for students who have completed their basic ballet technique. Pointe work for the ladies (optional) and the basic forms of tour en l’air for the male dancer are introduced. Classes are based on the basic principles of classical ballet according to the Russian ballet technique developed by Agrippina Vaganova. Creditable twice.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Ballet II or permission of instructor
DANC M411 Ballet Repertory
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is for students who have an advanced level of ballet technique and who are interested in pursuing a minor in ballet. Classes are based on the basic principles of classical ballet according to the Russian ballet technique developed by Agrippina Vaganova. Students perform classical and character, jazz, or contemporary works in the Loyola Ballet Concert.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Ballet or permission of instructor via audition
DANC M499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
3.00
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
DANC O242 History of Classical Dance
Credit Hours:
3.00

Advanced Common Curriculum: Creative Arts and Cultures

An historical perspective of classical dance from the Renaissance to the 21st Century, through lectures, readings and visuals will give the acquired historical knowledge to view and analyze several ballet masterpieces. This viewing acquaints the students with outstanding performers as it develops in the students a sense of informed critical observation.

Prerequisite(s):

Design (DSGN)

DSGN M200 Design Lecture Forum
Credit Hours:
0.00

Design forum is a gathering of all students and faculty in design. This monthly meeting will present a guest speaker from the design community: locally, nationally, or internationally. Students are encouraged to ask questions.

Prerequisite(s):
DSGN M271 Design History I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This introductory course will discuss design history from the beginning of written communication through the industrial revolution and WWI. Although the focus will be on the study of visual communications in their historical contexts, the course will also include architecture, industrial, and environmental design. Design discourse will be introduced through historical writings and critical analysis. Students will also participate in discussion by writing critical texts that respond to course material.

Prerequisite(s):
DSGN M272 Design History II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This advanced course is a continuation of Design History I and will cover the history of design from WWII to the present. Although the focus will be on the study of visual communications in their historical contexts, other forms of design will be examined. Design discourse will focus on contemporary issues. Students will participate in discussions of critical texts and will be asked to write design criticism that incorporates a social and historical perspective. After completion of this course, students will have a greater understanding of how designers have shaped society.

Prerequisite(s): Design History I
DSGN M275 Print Design + Narrative
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students are introduced to print narrative through typography and image making. Principles of composition: scale, weight, space, texture, direction, form, color will be introduced. Other basic design foundations including color, grid, methodology, craftsmanship and tools for creating print design will be explored. This course expands the concept of narrative by examining multiple printed formats such as posters, booklets, postcards and zines.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s):
Corequisite(s):
DSGN M276 Interactive Design + Narrative I
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students are introduced to interactive narrative through design and coding. Principles of composition for the screen: scale, weight, space, texture, direction, form, color will be explored. Other basic design foundations including color, grid, methodology, craftsmanship and tools for creating interactive design will be covered. This course introduces the concept of narrative by examining multiple interactive formats like websites, apps, and e-readers.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Print Design + Narrative
Corequisite(s):
DSGN M278 Typography Lab I
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students are introduced to typography through a series of Swiss-style exercises focused on spacing (kerning, leading, tracking) and grids (creating and manipulating.) Other basic elements of typography, including classifications and history will be introduced. This course requires an intense focus on typography, structure, consistency, and hierarchy. Only a limited number of time tested typefaces will be explored and no imagery will be allowed. Students will learn to make meaning visible through typographic choices and critical reading of texts.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s):
Corequisite(s):
DSGN M279 Typography Lab II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced course in typography that will explore complex typographic problems. Building on the fundamentals of typographic form and function introduced in Typography Lab I, this course extends and applies basic vocabulary and understanding to more complex problems that address typographic hierarchy, context, sequence and form. Students explore how typography behaves across media. Increasingly complex typographic systems are implemented in three-dimensional, sequential page or time-based projects.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s):
DSGN M325 Interactive Design + Narrative II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced course in interactive narrative that will go beyond the web, although the class begins by building upon and refreshing existing web design skills. This course expands the concept of narrative by examining multiple interactive formats like websites, apps, and e-readers. Coding will be emphasized and designing for different platforms will be explored.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Interactive Design + Narrative I
DSGN M326 Motion Design + Narrative I
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students are introduced to motion narrative through storyboarding. Motion design builds on basic design principles and adds the dimensions of sound and time. Principles of composition for motion: scale, weight, space, texture, direction, form, color will be explored. Other basic design foundations including concept sketching, methodology, craftsmanship, and tools for creating motion design will be covered. This course expands the concept of narrative by examining typography in motion.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Interactive Design + Narrative I
DSGN M376 Motion Design + Narrative II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced course in motion narrative that focuses on concept, moving typography, and exploration of sound. This is a service learning class which includes field trips in the city of New Orleans. Projects are real-world based however, students are asked to explore and experiment beyond commercial solutions. Students will have mastered storyboarding skills and attain proficiency with industry standard software. Also, students will engage with professional designers and clients outside the classroom.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Motion Design + Narrative I
DSGN M377 Social/Political Design
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course addresses the designer’s role in shaping the public narrative on social issues. Students will examine contemporary cultural, political, and societal issues around the world that have an impact on our daily lives. They also learn how to design communication that increases awareness, motivates, inspires or incites action from specific or broad audiences. In this advance course, students will combine strategies from environmental, motion, interactive, and print design.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Motion Design + Narrative I
DSGN M400 Design Topics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This studio course offers exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific contemporary design focus. This course may be taken 3 times for credit as long as different topics are offered.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Motion Design + Narrative I
DSGN M475 Professional Design Practice
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is intended as a transition course, shifting those enrolled from the mind set of a student to that of a design professional. Students will continue to work on visual problem solving and development of creative skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be more aware and confident about the diverse aspects of working professionally. Intertwined with individual and group critiques will be discussions about the career of a designer: facing the client, pricing projects, working with printers, directing photography, collaboration, competing for jobs, design competitions, etc.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Social/Political Design
DSGN M476 Ethics and Contracts
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is taught by a professional designer and includes speakers from the professional community. This lecture course will cover topics from the world of professional design, from freelance to studios to agencies. Current information on job listings and pricing will be discussed. This course will also addresses legal issues such as how copyright laws affect the income and work of graphic designers and sample contracts for freelance projects. This class will inform students on the business side of design and will prepare them for the world of work. In this course students will create a portfolio website and supporting print materials for freelance work.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Social/Political Design
DSGN M480 Design Capstone Course
Credit Hours:
3.00

This final design course serves as a capstone experience for the design program. Students will author their own project where they will identify a problem and design an appropriate solution. Students are encouraged to choose projects that will propel them to the next stage after graduation. This course includes a final exhibition which is reviewed by outside design professionals. On completion of the course, each student must submit a process book for final project and documentation of work completed in the senior year.

This course has a lab fee associated with it for the purpose of supporting supplies specifically needed for the functioning of this particular course. Please check LORA for the amount of the lab fee.

Prerequisite(s): Professional Design Practice
DSGN M485 Design Internship
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides students with the opportunity and responsibility to work in various companies within the design industries during their studies at Loyola University New Orleans Department of Art and Design. Internships are considered “extended classrooms” and and are essential to the understanding of how the theory of the classroom is applied to the practices in the design world. Internships may be local, national, or international. Internships are encouraged in the last two years of art and design study. Internship class meets to discuss professional documents, expected experiences, portfolios, and past experiences of internships.

Prerequisite(s): Interactive Design + Narrative I

Digital Filmmaking (FILM)

FILM M100 Film Colloquium
Credit Hours:
1.00

Film Colloquium is a gathering of all students and faculty in the Digital Filmmaking Program. This weekly meeting usually presents a guest speaker from the film industry. These speakers are questioned by a student group and by the class at-large. Guests discuss diverse topics covering all aspects of the film industry.

Prerequisite(s):
FILM M110 Intro to the Business of Film
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides students with an overview of the film industry from a business perspective. Students will prepare business plans, select content, secure funding and intellectual property rights, hire talent, market, and plan core phases of production from conception to completion.

Prerequisite(s):
FILM M115 Intro to Digital Filmmaking
Credit Hours:
3.00

An introduction to the practical aspects of developing the three basic types of films: documentaries, performance, and feature films. This includes basic lighting techniques, camera operation and an introduction to non-linear editing.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s):
FILM M120 Development & Distribution
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces students to the core stages necessary to begin a marketable film, TV or web based production. Students will work in teams to research content, create budgets, solicit funding, select locations, plot schedules, develop marketing strategies, and target viable distribution markets. Several different genres will be examined in this collaborative process.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to the Business of Film
FILM M125 Script to Screen
Credit Hours:
3.00

An intensive practical experience in writing & directing in digital filmmaking, video & other new media. Students will complete a professional quality short film, writing, producing, casting and directing their own work.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking
FILM M150 Film Theory & Process
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course analyses some of the great films of the modern era by choices the directors made and studying the use of camera, lighting, sound, actors/acting, production design, music and the many creative choices that make a film great. This course examines why these choices were made and how they affect the result. 

Prerequisite(s):
FILM M200 Post Production Supervision
Credit Hours:
3.00

A practical survey of the role of the post production supervisor as it relates to film, television and other forms of media production. This multifaceted position incorporates technical, managerial and supervisory skills while guiding a project into post and through delivery. Attention is paid to VFx, scoring, sound mixing and color grading. 

Prerequisite(s):
FILM M210 Practical Film Lighting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course will introduce you to lighting design theory and practice. There will be discussions of aesthetics, techniques, and principles. You will be required to draft by hand and computer, sketch your ideas, and formulate lighting design approaches for film and television.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking
FILM M215 Cinematography
Credit Hours:
3.00

A hands-on introduction to the art and practice of cinematography. Students will learn the principles, elements, techniques, procedures and equipment that go into shooting digital video and film. Emphasis will be on how to achieve control of lighting, framing, movement, and image manipulation in order to shape mood, convey emotion, and tell story.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking
FILM M220 Audio for Film and Television
Credit Hours:
3.00

A practical survey of audio recording, editing and mixing for film, television and other distribution mediums. Topics include project supervision and coordination, recording techniques, sound editing and mixing, room acoustics, media management, and post production workflows.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking
FILM M230 Digital Editing
Credit Hours:
3.00

A basic introduction into the theoretical and practical aspects of video editing, including the use of Final Cut Pro, Avid, and other editing platforms.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking
FILM M310 Visual Effects for Film
Credit Hours:
3.00

Visual Effects for Film is a wide-ranging topic and could be an entire course of study. Here, we will focus on several core CGI techniques that are commonly used in the film and television industry. This course will present the concepts of digital compositing, matte painting, rotoscoping, digital erasing and creation, and motion tracking. Students will gain hands-on experience manipulating foreground and background images.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking
FILM M315 Directing for Camera
Credit Hours:
3.00

Focusing more on nuts and bolts than theory and with emphasis on dramatic, narrative filmmaking, classes will typically introduce the various challenges of that week’s subject in the first hour, go into detail on technique in the second, and spend the third dealing with exceptions and special problems. Extensive use of case studies and role-playing will teach students the on-the-fly problem solving that is the lifeblood of film directing.

Prerequisite(s): Digital Audio Production
FILM M320 Digital Pre-Visualization
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course presents the evolution, practice and techniques used in pre-visualization: the process of rehearsing complex set designs, lighting and actions within a virtual domain prior to the filming on a production set. Creative, practical and economic advantages are discussed through lectures; Current techniques including computerized storyboarding are taught and practiced through the planning, designing and creating of pre-visualized effect sequences.

There is a lab fee of $75 for this course for minors & non-majors.

Prerequisite(s): Visual Effects for Film
FILM M340 Documentary Filmmaking
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces students to the art of documentary filmmaking and the professional skills used in the field. The course practices non-fiction filmmaking from the conceptualization of an idea through post-production. Students will learn visual storytelling and interview techniques and the different documentary traditions, genres, and styles. 

Prerequisite(s): Intro to Digital Filmmaking Grade of C or better in listed prerequisites
FILM M420 Post-Production Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

Providing extensive hands-on training in sound, editing,  graphics, and other post-production topics in filmmaking. Currently used practices found in today’s film and television industry will provide experience directly related to working in this field. Also, the class will collaborate with other courses in related topic areas. 

Prerequisite(s): Audio for Film and Television
FILM M450 Senior Film Project
Credit Hours:
3.00

Capstone class of advanced study in the production of a single professional-quality film or video or other new media. This project is directly aimed at career development and creating a significant resume item to enhance employment and/or graduate school opportunities for each student. May be spread over both semesters of senior year.

Prerequisite(s): Directing for Camera, Arts & Entertainment Finance Senior

Economics (ECON)

ECON B200 Principles of Microeconomics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to economic analysis: efficiency and equity; production and exchange; costs, supply, and demand; markets, organizations, and government; competition, cooperation, and coercion; and international trade.

Prerequisite(s): Concepts in College Algebra, Introduction to Finite Mathematics Any of the prerequisites are accepted, Prerequisite listed may also be taken as a corequisite
ECON B201 Principles of Macroeconomics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to various theories of inflation and unemployment; economic growth; money, banking, and financial intermediation; interest rates; business cycles; exchange rates, trade balances, and the balance of payments; deficits and the national debt; monetary, fiscal, exchange rate, income, and regulatory policies; and national income, product, and international payments accounting.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Microeconomics
ECON B205 Intermediate Microeconomics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an analysis of market and firm coordination; the theory of consumer behavior and demand; the theory of supply; competition; the pricing of goods and resources; and government policies.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Microeconomics, Survey of Calculus, Calculus I Sophomore, Either math prerequisite is acceptable
ECON B206 Intermediate Macroeconomics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course considers various theories concerning the functioning of the macroeconomy: Classical and PreKeynesian, Keynesian and the Neoclassical Synthesis, Monetarism, Supply-Side, Fisher's Debt-Deflation Theory, Post Keynesian including Minsky's Financial Instability Hypothesis, and Austrian. Also covered briefly are Rational Expectations, Real Business Cycles, New Keynesianism, and Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium theories.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Macroeconomics, Survey of Calculus, Calculus I Either math prerequisite is acceptable, Grade of C or better in ECON B101, Sophomore
ECON B305 International Economics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course considers exchange rate systems; international monetary arrangements; adjustments in international disequilibrium situations; relationships among rates of exchange, inflation, interest, and unemployment; and domestic and international economic policies. It also considers various theories of competitive advantage in international trade, the nature and effects of commercial policies, and international economic integration.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B325 The Market Process
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course serves as an introduction to subjectivist economics. Primary emphasis is on the Austrian School. Topics covered include history and methodology; the market process and intervention; capital and interest; money, credit, and the financial system; and business cycles.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B330 Law and Economics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an economic analysis used to consider the effects of legal rules upon people’s actions. Alternative rules are considered, with particular attention paid to the differing effects each is likely to have on the structure of incentives, and thus on human actions.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B335 Economic Development
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course considers the disparity of material well-being among the masses of people in different countries. Topics include causes of poverty and wealth; nature of economic growth; the roles of the state, markets, and social and cultural institutions in economic development.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B340 History of Economic Thought
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course discusses the origins and evolution of the history of economic ideas and theories. Topics may include ancient and medieval thought, Roman and early Christian thought, the mercantilists, the physiocrats, Adam Smith and the Classical economists, Karl Marx, the marginal revolution, the Keynesian revolution, and contemporary economics.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B345 Labor Economics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an overview of diverse topics in economics which deal specifically with labor market issues. Topics include the supply and demand of labor; human capital theory; migration and mobility; the job search process; employment and unemployment; unions; compensation issues; discrimination; and earnings and income distribution.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B350 Industrial Organization and Public Policy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This class investigates the nature of firms and industries: Why firms exist and why firms have diverse organizational structures; why industry structures differ; competition and monopoly; firm behavior; transaction cost theory; and the effects of antitrust policy.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B360 Econometrics I - Linear Models
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an intermediate level statistics course. After a brief overview of statistics, the course covers least squares estimation, statistical inference, diagnostic methods, selection and evaluation of functional form, and simultaneous equations estimation. The course focuses more on applied work than on its theoretical underpinnings. Students are actively involved with computer exercises in this course, using the STATA software program. Students will complete a comprehensive statistical research project.

Prerequisite(s): Business Statistics, Principles of Macroeconomics Junior
ECON B365 Econometrics II - Time Series
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an advanced level statistics course focusing on time-series models. The course covers how to detect, estimate, and make valid inferences from univariate, multivariate, and potentially panel data. Classic univariate models may include autoregressive, moving average, integrated, and distributed lag models; multivariate models may include vector autoregressions and cointegrated models; panel-data models include panel-VARs. The course focuses more on applied work than on its theoretical underpinnings. Students are actively involved with computer exercises in this course, using the STATA software program. Students will complete a comprehensive statistical research project.

Prerequisite(s): Econometrics I - Linear Models Junior
ECON B493 Special Topics in Economics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Economics offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics Junior
ECON H295 Honors Topics in Economics
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Economics offered for the University Honors Program.

Prerequisite(s):

Emergency Services Management (EMS)

EMS A205 Emergency Medical Response Planning
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course provides an analysis of the players involved; coordination with governmental emergency management; legal requirements; employee disaster awareness and preparedness; disaster mitigation and response; business resumption considerations and public policy considerations and community outreach. 

Prerequisite(s):
EMS A210 Emergency Medical Services Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the core functions of the emergency medical services (EMS) administrator and concepts associated with the administration of an EMS service. Areas of study include a broad overview of key elements including strategic planning, customer service, marketing, quality management, and data collection. Essential knowledge relevant to all aspects of the EMS profession is introduced, and assignments are provided to allow for application of these concepts.

Prerequisite(s):

English (ENGL)

ENGL A100 Expository Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to English composition that focuses on grammar, paragraph and essay structure, and critical reading skills. This course is for students who are not yet ready to take ENGL T122. Students are assigned to the course on the basis of a placement test administered by the English department. Students may not take ENGL A100 for degree credit after successful completion of ENGL T122.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A120 Magis Composition Enrichment
Credit Hours:
1.00

ENGL A120 offers enhanced instruction for Magis students enrolled in ENGL A100.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A205 Writing about Texts
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is the introductory composition course for English majors and minors substituting for ENGL T122; other interested students must receive permission from the department chair. It covers rhetorical, argumentative, and representational dimensions of literary and non-literary texts, and serves as a general introduction to the practice of literary criticism. 

Please note: ENGL-A205 is required of all English majors, regardless of AP or other credit by examination or of transfer credits equivalent to ENGL-T122. Students changing their majors to English who have already taken ENGL-T122 are still required to take A205. All such credits for ENGL-T122 will be counted as general elective credit for English majors.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A206 Reading Poetry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the basic tools needed to read and write about English and American poetry, including the concepts of genre, form, meter, figurative representation, and history.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A207 Reading Film
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces students to reading films and gives some familiarity with film criticism.  Students focus on different aspects of film, such as mise en scene, acting, editing, sound, photography, and ideology in order to understand both the aesthetic and the political role film plays in modern life.

This course replaces ENGL A370, How To Read A Film

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A208 Writing from Sources
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on the research process, evaluation of sources, and in-depth writing assignments with emphasis on primary research.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A211 Introduction to Creative Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a multi-genre introductory course in the theory and practice of creative writing.  Students learn critical reading skills, writing skills, and the elements of creative writing by reading and analyzing a wide range of literature across genres including poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, and screenplay. Student work is read and critiqued in a workshop setting. Students complete a portfolio of revised original creative work.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A217 Reading Historically I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides a foundation in English literary history from the medieval period through the 17th century. Reading works across contiguous historical periods, students explore their significance in historical, formal, and aesthetic contexts, and we consider how contemporary critical approaches enhance our understanding of this material.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A218 Reading Historically II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores developments in English literary history from 1700 to the present. Reading works across contiguous historical periods, we consider their significance in historical, formal, and aesthetic contexts, and we experiment with critical approaches to enhance our understanding of this material.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A220 Media and Mediation
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides an introduction to the means by which creative narratives are being re-interpreted through film and other digital media.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A222 How to Do Things with Video Games
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course considers video games as a cultural form. It prepares students to analyze and compare the ways video games make meaning and participate in the social lives of their players.  It introduces students to critical discussions surrounding video games and some methodologies for interpreting them. 

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A241 Modern Nonfiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides a history and survey of American creative nonfiction, with the emphasis on its development into a major genre in the second half of the twentieth century.  Assignments focus on both writing nonfiction as well as crafting critical analyses of its techniques, themes, and impact.  

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A242 Contemporary Nonfiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to contemporary nonfiction writing in a variety of forms including autobiography, travel writing, and the personal essay.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the student to modern short fiction, beginning with Chekhov. The emphasis is on authors writing in languages other than English.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A255 Intro to Shakespeare
Credit Hours:
3.00

This courses acts as a student's introduction to Shakespearean drama. In addition to covering the cultural and thematic content of the plays, close attention is given to Shakespeare's use of the visual, spatial, and temporal elements of stagecraft that distinguish his drama as a performance art.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A270 History of Film
Credit Hours:
3.00

History of Film is an introduction to the rich history and legacy of the motion picture as a commercial art form. The goal of the course is to educate students on the major figures and developments in cinema. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of major events, figures, and films in the history of cinema and will be comfortable with writing about film as a narrative art.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A306 Professional Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the art of generating texts in professional settings. This class focuses on the writing skills necessary to produce clear, concise, appropriate, and well organized writing on the job. We will be examining audience awareness, different document formats, and the impact of technology on writing practices. Throughout this eight-week course, we will work on harnessing your attention to detail, organizing documents, revising, and creating texts written towards your intended audience.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts
ENGL A311 Writing Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing short fiction. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students read widely and analyze published short stories as well as peer work.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing Sophomore, or permission of instructor
ENGL A312 Writing Poetry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing poetry. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students read widely and analyze published poems as well as peer work.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing Sophomore, or permission of instructor
ENGL A313 Screenwriting I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is the first in a two-part sequence on screenwriting. Students learn formatting and elements of screenwriting by adapting a short story into a script for a short film. Each student also develops a story and completes as the final project a treatment for an original feature-length screenplay to be written in ENGL A314. Upon completion of the course, students have a foundation in the craft of screenwriting necessary to complete a feature-length screenplay.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing Sophomore, or permission of instructor
ENGL A314 Screenwriting II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is the second in a two-part sequence on the craft of feature screenwriting. In the first weeks of the semester, students begin writing a screenplay based on the treatment they wrote and revised in ENGL A313. Each student writes an original feature-length screenplay as the final project, a draft of which is completed by mid-term. These drafts are critiqued in a workshop and revised over the second half of the semester.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing, Screenwriting I Sophomore, or permission of instructor
ENGL A316 Medieval Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This courses offers a broad introduction to texts written in the British Isles between the beginning of the eighth century and the end of the fifteenth. Students study a wide array of medieval literary genres and their conventions. Further reading and discussion are devoted to the literary, historical, political, cultural, artistic, philosophical, and theological contexts for the various modes of written expression studied in the course.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A317 Writing the Short Script
Credit Hours:
3.00

Writing the Short Script focuses on monologues, dialogues and short scripts. Designed to strengthen the dialogue and blocking skills of students interested in writing fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and stage plays, the course combines readings of modern and contemporary literature with workshop discussions and individual conferences with the instructor about writing assignments.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A324 Early Shakespeare
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic and poetic works from Shakespeare's literary “apprenticeship” of the early 1590s to 1600. Situating Shakespeare’s works in their dynamic historical context—including the Protestant Reformation, the age of exploration, the rise of capitalism, the urban landscape of London, and the popular new public theatres—we study how these plays and poems spoke to Renaissance auditors and how they pose timeless questions for new audiences.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A325 Late Shakespeare
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on Shakespeare's works after 1600. Established by this time as a successful playwright and poet, Shakespeare takes greater risks with language, form, and themes in this second half of his career. Tracking these innovations through his late comedies and the genres of tragedy and romance that he preferred during this time, we attend to Shakespeare's work in its broader cultural and artistic context.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the modern European novel. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction.)

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Sophomore
ENGL A331 Introduction to African-American Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of African-American literature from the late 18th-century through Reconstruction to 1900.  The course examines various types of African-American literary and cultural productions, including folk narratives, autobiographies, slave narratives, essays, speeches, poetry, and short fiction, as well as the historical, cultural, socio-political and literary contexts in which they were produced.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A332 African-American Literature Since 1900
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of African-American literature after 1900, providing an historical and cultural study of the foundational writers, themes, and genres of African-American literary production of the era. The course provides a conceptual framework for this literature, evaluates key terms, ideas, literary periods, constructions and representations of African-American identity and race, and the contributions of African-American writers to American literature and culture.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A333 Narrative Across Media
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course tracks narrative across multiple media forms. It prepares students to analyze and compare the ways narrative gets implemented by different media, as well as chart stories that extend beyond individual media objects. In the process, they will consider narrative's media-specificity even as it seems to transcend media.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A335 Postcolonial Literatures
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of postcolonial literatures from Africa, India, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Postcolonial literature largely emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, after people across the global South gained political independence from Western colonizers.  Readings focus on both the counter-narratives of history, memory, and identity that were central literary concerns after independence and more recent literary trends that explore globalization, cosmopolitanism, multilingualism, and migration.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A336 Indigenous Literatures of the Americas in Translation
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the literary and cinematic works of indigenous authors across the Americas. In this writing intensive course, students learn how to read, think and write critically about literature while exploring the historical and cultural realities of indigenous peoples in the Americas. The study of this literature adds nuance to the anthropological, sociological and historical “facts” to these different groups and their literatures. A focus on translation theory as the point of departure allows students a critical approach to these texts. This course is cross-listed with LAS-A336: Students only receive credit for successfully completing the first instance of the course/s.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A340 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the variety and complexity of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Students approach the Tales as an anthology of literary forms current in fourteenth-century England and consider Chaucer’s genius in subverting the conventions of these forms. Students analyze selected tales from a variety of critical positions while also attending to the influence of 14th-century politics, religion, science, and art on the development of Chaucer’s poetry.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A346 Renaissance Poetry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course surveys English lyric poetry of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by poets such as Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Whitney, Donne, Herbert, and Wroth. We consider how poets imagine, structure, and transform their craft at this time of both classical revival and extraordinary innovation.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A348 Modern Poetry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course surveys the major figures in England and America from Whitman to the beginning of World War II, such as Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Auden.

Prerequisite(s): Reading Poetry Sophomore
ENGL A349 Twentieth-century American Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines American novels and short stories from 1900 to the turn of the twenty-first century, exploring such movements as realism, naturalism, regionalism, modernism, ethnic writing, and postmodernism.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A350 New Orleans in Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the relationship between literature and place focusing on literary representations of New Orleans from the 1830s to the present. Readings include drama, poetry, and prose by natives and non-natives whose work both represents and constructs the mystique of the city.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A351 Louisiana Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the writers and literary traditions of Louisiana in the context of local, regional, and national concerns.  Readings include works of fiction, drama, and poetry from the colonial period to the present.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A352 Literature and Environment
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores shifting definitions and concepts of nature, environment, and ecology in a range of literary texts across different time periods, forms, and modes of aesthetic experimentation.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A372 Studies in American Cinema
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a special topics course that offers students the opportunity to study film directors, genres, or ideological films.  This course may be repeated when topics change.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A373 The Black Writer in America
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course highlights the contributions of African-American writers to the literary traditions of the United States. Those contributions are virtually contemporary with the colonization of North America and shapes the themes and genres of American literature for the next three hundred years: from the slave narrative to local color fiction, from the Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights movement to contemporary writers.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Sophomore, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A376 Studies in Technoculture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This special topics course investigates the ways culture shapes and is shaped by technology.  It explores the reception, theory, and representation of technology and treats, but is not limited to, questions of poetics, aesthetics, history, politics and the environment.  Specific topics change each semester. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Senior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A385 Women Writers
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the literary tradition of women writers, reading a variety of texts and genres across a range of history and cultural backgrounds, primarily British and American, considering such issues as the relationship between gender and culture and the impacts of race, class, and sexuality on literary achievement.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced writing workshop on the art and craft of creative nonfiction in which students read and write in a wide range of genres such as memoir, autobiography, narrative journalism, personal essay, travel and food writing, profiles, reviews, science and nature writing. Students complete a portfolio of revised original short creative nonfiction.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Writing from Sources, Introduction to Creative Writing, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Either ENGL T122 or ENGL A205 AND either ENGL A208 or ENGL A211
ENGL A405 Editing and Publishing
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the student writer to the world of contemporary editing and publishing, print and digital, with an emphasis on an understanding of these as they affect both the creative writer and the writer of nonfiction.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A406 Internship: Editing and Publishing
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course students work on the editing and publication of the New Orleans Review, a nationally-distributed literary journal published at Loyola since 1968. Students work with the editorial staff to produce an issue of the print journal and to maintain the journal’s website.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A408 Writing: Technique and Technology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This class addresses the ways in which the task of composition changes in digital and online contexts. It is divided equally between tutorials on digital composition best practices and historical and theoretical perspectives on writing and technology. The course requires substantial computer work, but no prior experience is necessary.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A409 Contemporary Topics in Rhetoric
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines significant trends in contemporary theories of rhetoric and the writing process with special emphasis on how these theories relate to the teaching of composition at all levels.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A410 Writing Gender
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines the impact of contemporary feminist thought on rhetorical theory and introduces students to writing practices resulting from that impact. Readings from leading feminist theorists, critics, and literary authors provide a foundation for nonfiction writing assignments that combine personal experience with critical theory and encourage experimentation with voice and form.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A411 Fiction Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines advanced topics in the writing of fiction, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. The course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. In addition to writing short fiction, students read extensively and analyze contemporary fiction.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing Junior
ENGL A412 Poetry Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course examines advanced topics in the writing of poetry, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. The course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. In addition to writing poems, students read extensively and analyze contemporary poetry.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing Junior
ENGL A415 Creative Writing Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is an advanced special topics workshop that focuses on a select topic or genre such as film writing, nature writing, travel writing, flash fiction/prose poetry, and experimental writing. In addition to writing, critiquing, and revising their own work, students read widely and critique published work related to the topic. Students complete a portfolio of revised original creative writing related to the topic. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Creative Writing Junior
ENGL A417 Playwriting Workshop
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a workshop examining the writing of plays as well as aspects of writing film scripts. In addition to writing dramatic exercises and plays, students read extensively and analyze examples of plays and films.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A420 Tudor and Stuart Drama
Credit Hours:
3.00

From magic and mistaken identity to revenge and jealousy, English Renaissance playwrights created a vibrant theatrical world that defined an age. This course explores non-Shakespearean drama spanning from the 1550s, before the first public theaters were built, through the tense moments before Parliament closed them in 1642. We consider how dramatists engaged the conventions of classical drama and used their craft to confront changing attitudes about religion, politics, gender, and economy.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A422 Studies in Renaissance Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This seminar explores the development of a specific theme or genre in a transnational early modern context. Topics include Renaissance Women Writers, Renaissance Epic, The Literature of Empire, or Gender and Sexuality in Renaissance Literature. Primary texts are drawn from both English and continental literatures, while secondary readings include current critical and theoretical approaches, making this course excellent preparation for graduate study in literary and cultural fields. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A424 Medieval Drama
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course surveys Roman-style comedies, Latin liturgical drama and Anglo-Norman religious plays in medieval England before turning to Middle English biblical, morality and saints' plays. Dramatic texts are supplemented by non-dramatic literature. Music, theological writing, and visual materials are considered with some emphasis placed on stagecraft.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A425 Restoration/18th-century Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of the major poets and prose writers of the Restoration and the 18th century with an emphasis on Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Boswell.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A426 18th-century British Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of the development of the novel in England through the French Revolution, with readings from Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A427 Romanticism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course in British Romanticism is fundamentally about revolution. It begins with the historical context of revolution in France, America, and industrial production, and examines shifting conceptions of society and the self in the aftermath of those revolutions. It focuses on revolutions in poetry and the novel in texts by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Byron, Keats, the Shelleys, and more.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A428 Victorian England
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines Victorian England, which saw major changes in structures of class, ethnicity and gender, an expanding empire, and a revolution in how things were made and who made them. The course looks at innovations in narrative and poetic form at the intersection of what Victorians called “Life and Art,” in essays by Arnold, Pater, and Wilde; poetry by Tennyson, the Brownings, the Brontës, the Rossettis, Hopkins, and Hardy; and fiction by Dickens, George Eliot, and Thackeray, and more.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A429 19th-century British Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation of A426, examining the development of the novel in the 19th century with study of the works of Austen, the Brontës, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, among others.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A430 20th-century British Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation of A426 and A429, examining the fiction of writers such as Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf with some attention given to contemporary fiction.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A438 Southern Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the literature of perhaps the most distinctive region of the United States: the American South. From its colonial roots, through slavery and secession and civil war and reconstruction, from its twentieth-century renascence to its presumed disappearance into the homogeneity of twenty-first century America, this literary tradition offers a peculiarly rich perspective on our national identity.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A444 Posthumanism
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a comparative media investigation of a variety of topics under the heading of posthumanism. Focusing on a selection of novels, film, and video games concerned with technological and/or biological augmentations, we will explore such questions as what does it mean to be human or is "human" even a meaningful category, what is the relationship between science and nurture, and what is the work of the humanities in a posthuman condition.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A466 Southern Women Writers
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the contributions of women writers to the distinctiveness of the South, the range of their achievement as artists, and the complex relationships they developed with each other and to the structures of their singularly traditional culture.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A470 Film and the Art of Literary Adaptation
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides students with an understanding of how a work of literature is translated into a film. The core material for the course varies from semester to semester, but is comprised of fiction that has successfully been adapted to the screen, especially short stories, novels, and theatrical plays. The course also deals with films created from classic drama, including Shakespeare, as well as folklore and historical records.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A472 Studies in Global Cinema
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a special topics course exploring European cinemas, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in relation to the individual cultures from which they arise. Aesthetic and sociocultural differences between these national cinemas and Hollywood are stressed. The specific topic changes each term. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A474 Studies in Global Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

This seminar explores the development of a specific theme or genre in contemporary global literature and/or cinema. Topics vary by semester, but might include Magical Realism, the African Novel, or Global Human Rights Literature.  Primary texts are drawn from African, Asian, Caribbean, and/or Latin American traditions. Students gain facility with theoretical trends that challenge traditional critical perspectives and foreground those that emerge from the global South. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A476 Great Figures– Renaissance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an intensive study of one or two great medieval literary figures. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A478 Great Figures– 19th-century
Credit Hours:
3.00

This special topics course is an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the 19th century. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A479 Great Figures - American Pre-1900
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great American literary figures of the pre-1900s. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. Authors may include, Melville, Hawthorne, Thoreau and Emerson, and Henry James.This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A485 Interpretive Approaches
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course looks at influential developments in literary theory and cultural criticism across the twentieth century and up to the present.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A487 Contemporary Critical Issues
Credit Hours:
3.00

This is a special topics course focusing on different contemporary issues in literary criticism, such as environmental theory, new media, food studies, and post-humanism.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A490 Great Figures
Credit Hours:
3.00

This special topics seminar is an intensive study of one or two influential literary figures. It traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and contemporary assessments. This course may be repeated with permission.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Junior, Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL A491 Practicum in Teaching Writing
Credit Hours:
1.00

This practicum focuses on methods and materials for teaching writing. Students work in the Writing across the Curriculum lab.

Prerequisite(s): Writing about Texts, Critical Reading and Writing Any of the prerequisites are accepted, Permission of instructor
Corequisite(s):
ENGL A493 Directed Readings
Credit Hours:
3.00

Course content varies and is keyed to the participants' interests in relevant professional topics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A495 Special Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A496 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A497 Internship/Practicum
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A498 Research Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This course includes work leading to the English Honors thesis or the University Honors senior thesis, as well as work done independently under professorial supervision.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL N200 WAL: Autobiography
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills while exploring autobiography in a broad context, looking at a wide range of approaches to the construction and presentation of the self in literature, in different literary forms and cultural traditions. Students begin by reading carefully and making observations about the way in which the self, and the text itself, are constructed, and arrive through critical thinking and writing at interpretations of these observations about the texts.
 

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N202 WAL: Barbarism
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. Reading literary representations of “the barbaric,” from its classical origins as a linguistic category to contemporary representations in the discourse of terrorism, we trace the representation of the “barbarous” other alongside the “civilized” self. Students learn to fashion their own ideas about what they read and to argue those ideas persuasively in writing.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N204 WAL: Cyberpunk and Apocalyptic Fiction
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills by reading and analyzing cyberpunk and apocalyptic literature. The course examines how images of the future evoked in this literature can help us face the cultural, political, and environmental problems of today.

This course replaces ENGL T125

 

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N205 WAL: Video Games and Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course focuses on the relationship between video games and literature. Though some have suggested video games supposedly threaten the long-term future of reading good literature, the two have much more in common than one would first expect. Students in this course will encounter games that aspire to be literature and literature that aspires to be game-like as well as games about writing fiction and fiction about playing games, as they explore how these different narrative media conceive of each other.

This course replaces ENGL T125

 

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N206 WAL: Form & Adaptation
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. The course involves literary texts drawn from the genres of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and film. Students read works in English or translated into English from the original language in order to gain a broad understanding of literary devices and to develop the practice and learn the terminology of literary analysis. Form and Adaptation requires that students demonstrate their understanding of the material through the composition of papers and participation in class discussion.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N208 WAL: Genre and the Hybrid
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills paying particular attention to genre. Beginning with a brief survey of the traditional genres of short stories, poetry, and the novel, the course then considers nontraditional cross-genre texts that have emerged in the postmodern literary world. These hybrid texts challenge the way students read, encourage a deeper appreciation of non-traditional writing, provide tools for analyzing a broad range of literary texts, and raise the following question: Why do some contemporary writers gravitate toward hybridity in genre, and how might their choices reflect other changes in our postmodern society?

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N210 WAL: Global Identities
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. This course takes as its starting point the contradictions that ground our experiences of globalization and explores how the globalization of economic, political, and cultural systems produces at the same time a euphoric sense of freedom and unbounded possibility and a fear of dislocation and loss.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N212 WAL: How to Tell a True War Story
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills to examine written and visual representations of WWI, WWII, and the wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan to gain an understanding of how politics, social values, and the culture in which films and texts are produced shape the retelling of the war experience. The course explores combat trauma, shifting definitions of courage, the process of defining the enemy, heroism, gender identity, the language of war, the experience of soldiers returning from war and the importance of narrative and community in healing trauma.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N214 WAL: Interpreting the Other
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. The goal of this class is to examine literature with a critical eye and apply what we learn to our own lives by examining literary conventions, especially the idea of the "other," and how these conventions developed over time. Students discuss the importance of placing stories into a broader context, compare how a character or author operates within his or her context, and apply this knowledge to our own cultural, historical and political context.  Students learn why the study of literature is crucial in developing critical thinking skills and why these skills are important in creating our own "stories."                  

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N216 WAL: Postcolonial and Ethnic American Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills, and looks at texts that align with two major trends in contemporary literary study: postcolonial and ethnic American literature. Discussion of the major issues related to each of these fields of study and how literature responds to social and political contexts is the central focus of this course.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N218 WAL: Spy Stories
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills by introducing novels, short stories, poetry, and films by several giants of twentieth-century literature that feature spies as protagonists. Students learn how to analyze these spy stories in terms of genre, structure, and character and how to discuss literature from different critical perspectives. The course considers the affinities between the professional spy and the literary critic, both of whom are called upon to interpret signs and to search for their deeper meanings.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing
ENGL N220 WAL: Texts & Textuality
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills and focuses on reading literary texts, on examining literary conventions, and on writing analytically about literature.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N222 WAL: Thinking Critically about Food
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. The guiding theme of this course is food: how we talk about and represent it, how it influences culture and shapes our individual and collective identities, and how it reflects and affects the physical, psychological, and ecological health of our nation and globe.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N224 WAL: Work and the City
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. The course explores how Americans of different times and places have considered work in the sense of remunerative employment. In modern literature, city settings have often been the scene of critiques of the modes of labor (types of jobs) and the focus of how people have felt about them in industrial capitalist societies.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N226 WAL: Millennial Identity
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course uses critical reading as a foundation for developing critical thinking and writing skills. The course examines, through analysis of several different genres, three disasters/cataclysms of the early twenty-first century in order to understand how events in the world influence the writing and the reading of literature. The course covers The bombings of the World Trade Center in New York, Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and a projected nuclear catastrophe.

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N232 WAL: Culture of the Sixties
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This course examines several political and cultural movements of the sixties through the literature that grew out of and defined each one.  Students analyze fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, letters, and memoirs to understand the impact of the decade. 

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N234 WAL: American Gothic Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This section of Writing About Literature is designed to develop critical reading and writing skills through a cross-genre study of poetry, fiction, and film.  Gothic literature is a reaction to mainstream culture.  By understanding this reactionary literature, students gain a better understanding of American history and culture.  

This course replaces ENGL T125

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N236 WAL: Coming of Age in the South
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This section of Writing About Literature examines Southern literature about adolescence. By reading poetry, novels, plays, essay, and film, we learn what it means to grow up in the South and how class, race, gender, violence and sexuality shape coming of age.

This course replaces ENGL T125

 

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL N238 WAL: New Orleans Literature
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Writing About Literature

This Writing about Literature course focuses on literature about New Orleans. We will read fiction, drama, and verse set in the city, from the early 19th century to the present. Writing assignments will ask students to compare the works of imaginative literature to each other, to the historical record, and to theories regarding New Orleanian society and aesthetics.

This course replaces ENGL T125

 

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O206 Deconstructing Superheroes
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

Superhero stories appeal to us because they work through relevant concepts, such as identity, morality, power, and citizenship. These stories explore meaningful questions: What does it mean to be good? What is the nature of evil, and how is it vanquished? What balance should we strike between personal freedom and group security? We will investigate the ways in which specific superheroes have taken up these and other social questions, and we will study the superhero's flip side, the super villain.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts
ENGL O210 Narratives: Illness & Trauma
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course examines narratives that attempt to make sense of the problem of disease. Readings and films focus on physical traumas such as cancer, Alzheimer's Disease, amputation, and paralysis as a way of exploring larger themes such as radical body transformation, the sense of the loss of self, and empathy. Is disease salvific? Is it meaningless? The texts explore an array of emotional and ideological responses to human frailty.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O236 Anime: Cinema and Culture
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts & Cultures

Anime encompasses history, literature, culture, politics, religion, technology, and aesthetics. this course focuses on anime from Anime that sparked American interest and analyzes the impact of anime on American popular culture and high art.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O242 Ireland Through Film
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts & Cultures

Ireland Through Film introduces students to the world of Irish film. The course is designed to provide students with a way to see the relationship between Irish film and the creation of an Irish political and cultural identity. The class looks at images of the Irish from the stock Irishman to more complex contemporary versions of the Irish. Ireland Through Film will help students understand the historical, political, cultural, and religious conflicts that have made modern Ireland.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O252 New Orleans as Myth, Perform
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts & Cultures

New Orleans is one of the United States' most mythologized places. Its long history of representation in the national culture affects the way locals, visitors, and distant onlookers perceive the city today. New Orleans as Myth and Performance will look at the ways in which New Orleans functions as a myth in the national culture, and the ways in which New Orleanian identity is performed in multiple genres, including the mass public spectacle of carnival.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O256 American Regionalism
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course traces the role of place in the literary traditions of North America, questioning the continuity and significance of regionalism as a defining element of our cultural and literary heritage--and of our future in increasingly global and diverse contexts.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O288 Vikings: Warrior-Poets
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course introduces the literature, history, and culture of medieval Scandinavia. It opens with readings in Norse mythography and legendary history before turning to the portrayal of the Viking Age in the Old Norse sagas. Half of the semester is devoted to a careful reading of these complex narratives of politics, love, adventure, and violence, which comprise Europe’s first great corpus of prose literature.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL O299 Arthurian Legend
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Cultures

This course introduces students to the Arthurian tradition through a study of the origins and development of the Arthurian narrative, situating it within the historical, religious, and social context of Medieval Europe. The course begins with a survey of both the development and influence of Arthurian themes in early musical, visual, and literary traditions. Then the course proceeds to present the Perceval/Grail tradition from the 12th to the 20th century in literature, music and film.

Prerequisite(s): Critical Reading and Writing, Writing about Texts Any of the prerequisites are accepted
ENGL T121 First-Year Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

Foundation Courses: First Year Seminar

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. First-Year Seminars at Loyola are small, discussion-based seminars that introduce new college students to academic inquiry at the university level by investigating a relevant topic. Specially-trained faculty lead these seminars in a way that instills in students the academic skills necessary to become successful Loyola students. Course titles may differ from section to section based on the instructor's focus for the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL T122 Critical Reading and Writing
Credit Hours:
3.00

Foundation Courses: Critical Reading and Writing

This is a writing instructive course that focuses on critical reading and analysis of arguments to help students to think and write analytically. Reading critically and writing analytically train students to make their own effective written arguments using sources

Prerequisite(s):

Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

ENTR B300 Entrepreneurship
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course sheds light on the entrepreneurial process, from opportunity recognition to the funding and growth of a new venture. By engaging with case studies and each other, students learn how successful ventures have been created as well as how to create a novel venture from scratch. Importantly, the central aim of this course is not the creation of a successful business per se, but to provide a comprehensive toolkit for prospective founders so that their decision to engage in entrepreneurship is as well thought-out and fruitful as possible.

Prerequisite(s): Management + Organizational Behavior, Principles of Marketing Junior
ENTR B430 Entrepreneurial Strategy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides an in-depth look at the process of building a repeatable and scalable business venture from ideation through achievement of meaningful scale and eventual venture exit. The course focuses on the unique challenges of managing a rapidly growing business. The course is taught as a series of advanced case discussions supplemented with practitioner lectures studying the strategic decisions and day-to-day operational challenges of real start-up companies.

Prerequisite(s): Entrepreneurship Junior
ENTR B440 Entrepreneurial Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course follows the financial decisions over the life cycle of an entrepreneurial venture from the creation of the business through raising capital, managing for growth, and exit through acquisition or IPO.

Prerequisite(s): Entrepreneurship, Principles of Financial Accounting Junior
ENTR B493 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Entrepreneurship offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s): Entrepreneurship Junior
ENTR B815 Venture Capital Investment
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA Elective course exposes students to the world of venture capital and personal angel investment, equipping them to evaluate business opportunities from the investor’s perspective. Taught by practicing professionals, this class put students side-by-side with active local investors and teaches them to evaluate business models, understand term sheets, investment mechanics and valuation, as well as how to identify opportunities and perform due diligence on early-stage, high-growth start-up ventures.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR B820 Innovation + Entrepreneurship
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course exposes students to the new venture development process using methods used in the world’s top start-up incubator programs. Students will receive expert coaching as they generate a novel business model, validate that model in their target market through real customer contact, and create a go-to-market plan and fundraising strategy that makes their business a reality. In doing so, students will learn skills that will serve them when they launch their own startup or drive corporate innovation initiatives.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR B825 Entrepreneurial Strategy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective class uses the both traditional and “live” case method to explore various topics related to starting, growing, and “exiting” scalable, high growth, businesses. It immerses students into the local entrepreneurial ecosystem, exposing them to the everyday challenges and strategic decisions that must be made by the entrepreneur. The class also helps students understand the transition from a “start-up,” an entity searching for a business model, to a scalable growth-oriented business.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR B830 New Venture Consulting
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course teaches students how to help advance startups through various stages of development, allowing them to experience what it is like to both be an integral part of a founding team and guide founder decision making in an early-stage company. Students will be part of teams during two consulting engagements: one as the Loyola IDEAcorps team “moving the needle” for a local entrepreneur in New Orleans Entrepreneur Week and another as an autonomous consulting team working hand-in-hand with a growing start-up.

Prerequisite(s): Innovation + Entrepreneurship
ENTR B831 Lean Startup Launchpad
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course provides real world, hands-on learning on what it’s like to commercialize a new technology. Students will take a novel technology sourced from partner institutions, such as Stennis Space Center, and work to translate the core technology into a viable business through an in-depth customer discovery process. In this “flipped classroom”, students will work closely with inventors, engineers and an extensive network of coaches and mentors to understand a specific technology in the context of a market, and understand what it takes to connect entrepreneurship, engineering, and innovative science.

Prerequisite(s): Innovation + Entrepreneurship

Environment (ENVA)

ENVA A105 Foundations in Environmental Studies
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students explore the major questions of Environmental Studies through readings, class discussions, interaction with faculty and others working in the field, field observation, and through their own inquiry. This course is required of all Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors.

Prerequisite(s):
ENVA A497 Internship
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students gain practical experience in environmental fields by conducting service learning projects or volunteer work at some community, government, tourism, or non-government organization. It is expected that students complete at least 120 hours of service. Internships typically require an off-campus director that oversees day-to-day activities and an on-campus faculty sponsor that acts as the liaison between the student, director and the Environment program. Prior to undertaking an internship, a proposal must be submitted for approval through an Environment program faculty member.

Prerequisite(s):
ENVA A498 Independent Research
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students work with a faculty advisor to conduct theoretical, field, and/or laboratory research in some aspect of Environmental Science or Environmental Studies. Typically, this involves identifying an original question in an environmental topic, collecting and analyzing data, and preparing a written report of the findings. Prior to undertaking independent research, a proposal must be submitted for approval through an Environment program faculty member.

Prerequisite(s):
ENVA A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students work with a faculty advisor to conduct formal supervised activities providing educational experiences focused on some aspect of Environmental Studies or Environmental Science. A variety of experiences are possible here, so the student must work closely with a faculty advisor to identify specific requirements for completion of this effort. Prior to undertaking independent study, a proposal must be submitted for approval through an Environment program faculty member.

Prerequisite(s):

Finance (FIN)

FIN B200 Personal Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores those areas of finance which have direct impact on an individual’s financial decisions. Emphasis is on financial planning, budgeting and savings oriented cash management, credit usage and credit legislation, investments, tax planning, basic risk management and insurance concepts, retirement planning, estate planning, and Louisiana inheritance and community property law rules.

Note: May not be used as a finance major or general business elective

Prerequisite(s):
FIN B300 Financial Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces the analytic techniques commonly used for the financial management of business firms. Topics include analysis of financial statements, financial forecasting, asset valuation, capital budgeting, working capital management, and financial structure.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial Accounting, Business Statistics, Principles of Macroeconomics Sophomore
FIN B305 Analysis of Financial Statements
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines common techniques for the analysis of financial statements. In addition to covering traditional analytic approaches, this course explores the relationship between the selection of accounting procedures and the quality of the resulting statements.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Accounting I, Financial Management Junior
FIN B310 Financial Institutions
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the purpose and functions of financial markets and financial institutions, domestic and global. Emphasis is on asset/liability management. Cases may be used to foster an understanding of the problems and opportunities of different financial institutions. It is highly recommended that the student take FIN B300, Financial Management, first.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Macroeconomics, Financial Management Junior
FIN B315 Investments
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course analyzes different investment alternatives in a risk-return framework. Techniques for selection, timing, and diversification of investment choices are emphasized. Portfolio theory is also explained as the capstone element at the end of this course.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management Junior
FIN B325 International Financial Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course explores the problems and complexities associated with trade and investments that take place across national boundaries. Topics include financing international trade, exchange rate risk, risk exposure and management, and direct and indirect international investment considerations.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management Junior
FIN B400 Advanced Financial Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the theory and practice of financial management through case analysis and readings. Topics considered include working capital management, capital budgeting, financial structure, and dividend policy.

Prerequisite(s): Analysis of Financial Statements Junior
FIN B415 Student Managed Investment Fund
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course applies investment and portfolio concepts to the management of a $1,000,000+ securities portfolio funded by a gift to Loyola for the College of Business. The aim is a hands-on approach to learning and applying technical/fundamental financial analysis, risk/return evaluation, macro/micro market evaluation, and portfolio management.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Microeconomics, Principles of Macroeconomics, Principles of Financial Accounting, Business Statistics, Financial Management
FIN B440 Entrepreneurial Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course follows the financial decisions over the of the life cycle of an entrepreneurial venture from the creation of the business through raising capital, managing for growth, and exit through acquisition or IPO.

Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial Accounting, Entrepreneurship Junior
FIN B450 Real Estate Investments + Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course analyzes real estate financing and investment, vis-a-vis other investment alternatives in a risk-return framework. Primary focus is on evaluating the risk-return potential of income producing real property.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management Junior
FIN B460 Financial Derivatives
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides undergraduate students with the knowledge and comprehension of financial derivative instruments by providing theory and practice. Future, forward, option and swap contracts are discussed in detail as they apply to stocks, interest rates, foreign exchange and commodities. For each type of derivative instrument, underlying risk exposure, pricing and trading are discussed. Different trading strategies using options are provided with actual market information. Special emphasis is on the actual usage of derivatives within real markets for hedging and speculating purposes.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management Junior
FIN B493 Special Topics in Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Finance offered on an irregular basis. Previous topics include speculative markets (derivatives); real estate appraisal; portfolio analysis; global financial markets; entrepreneurship, expectations, and equilibrium; and investment banking.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management Junior
FIN B700 Financial Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA core course emphasizes the application of financial theory by giving the student a framework for analyzing and recommending alternative solutions to business financial problems. Special emphasis will be on financial decision-making that requires integrating the core finance areas of corporate finance, investments, portfolio management, and multinational finance. The course combines application to real life cases with theoretical concepts. The course provides the tools needed for fundamental as well as technical analysis of selected publicly traded companies.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN B805 Investment Management
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course advances the graduate student’s knowledge and comprehension of financial markets and securities by providing a deeper understanding of the theory, practice and application of the principles of investments. The course emphasizes the application of financial theory by giving the student a framework for analyzing a variety of markets and investments including stocks, bonds and options. Topics such as time value of money, risk and return, portfolio management, and securities valuation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management
FIN B815 Venture Capital Investment
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course provides students with insight into the benefits of a career in venture capital, and equips them with many of the tools and practices needed to pursue opportunities in this field. The most important topics covered in the course are: 1. How to evaluate business models from the perspective of a variety of key stakeholders; 2. How to best approach valuation and conducting due diligence on new ventures, based on the latest guidance from leading venture capital funds; and 3. How to seek equity funding and the mechanics of new venture equity funding.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN B820 Financial Statement Analysis
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course examines techniques for the analysis of financial statements, explores the relationship between the selection of accounting procedures and the quality of the resulting statements, analyzes the profitability and riskiness of the firm through the entrepreneurial alertness of management, forecasts future pro-forma financial statements, and values the firm through discounted future cash flows.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management
FIN B830 Real Estate Investment
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course examines the analysis and risk-return characteristics of various types of real estate with the emphasis on residential income properties. The focus of the course is on evaluating cash flow, tax shelter and appreciation benefits of real estate investments. A paper applying real estate investment analysis and techniques serves as the term project.

Prerequisite(s): Financial Management
FIN B835 Business Decision Modeling
Credit Hours:
3.00

This MBA elective course covers the development and interpretation of statistical, financial, and mathematical models for business decision making. Modeling techniques discussed may include applied probability distributions, time series analysis / forecasting, classification and/or clustering models, scenario / what-if analysis, linear optimization and sensitivity analysis, simulation models, decision trees / decision analysis, and expected value / utility analysis. Students gain expertise in the application of rigorous quantitative analysis to complex business decisions in the areas of strategic planning, financial management, and operations research.

Prerequisite(s): Managerial Economics + Statistics
FIN B893 Special Topics in Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course designation is applied to topical electives in Finance offered on an irregular basis.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN B899 Independent Study in Finance
Credit Hours:
3.00

See description of independent study guidelines in the MBA Program Overview.

Prerequisite(s):

Food Studies (FOST)

FOST A205 Introduction to Food Studies
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is designed to give students an overview of important contemporary issues in food studies, and a taste of a variety of ways to approach those issues. We will study the social, economic, psychological, and cultural impacts of food and cooking, in homes, schools, and professions, and the social contexts for our relationships with food.

Prerequisite(s):
FOST A210 Foundations in Food Systems and Commerce
Credit Hours:
3.00

How can we understand the system that brings food from the field to the plate? What characterizes our current food system? What alternatives have existed in the past and might exist in the future? This course will examine these questions, using a variety of investigative tools to better understand food systems and commerce.

Prerequisite(s):
FOST A211 Foundations in Food Culture
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the cultures of food, exploring how people use food to define themselves as individuals, groups, and societies, and how cultural concerns shape food. The course investigates the meaning and significance of food in different cultures, and how race, ethnicity gender, socioeconomic status and religion influence food choices.

Prerequisite(s):
FOST A212 Foundations in Food Policy
Credit Hours:
3.00

Foundations in Food Policy addresses normative questions about food policy: how should we make decisions about our food system?; and descriptive questions about food policy: How do we make these decisions, in practice? The course looks at food policy through the perspectives of its stakeholders to investigate what food policy is and what it does.

Prerequisite(s):
FOST A497 Internship/Practicum
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An internship is a supervised practical experience. A practicum is a supervised practical application of previously studied theory. 

Prerequisite(s):
FOST A498 Research Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This project focuses on an empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. 

Prerequisite(s):
FOST A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite(s):

Forensic Science (FRSC)

FRSC A100 Introduction to Forensic Science
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course will serve as a summary of the field of forensic science.  The student will be given information in the form of lectures and case studies. It will cover the basic principles associated with forensic science, as well as touch on many of the specialized disciplines of this field.  It will illustrate the path evidence takes from its collection at the crime scene, through analysis in the crime laboratory, and into the courtroom.  This course will focus on how forensic science plays a key role in all aspects of criminal investigation and prosecution.

Prerequisite(s):
FRSC A200 Criminalistics I: Crime Scene
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course serves as an overview of the techniques utilized in crime scene investigation. The student will be given information in the form of lectures and then apply what they have learned through hands-on laboratory exercises.  Students will learn the basic principles of recognition, documentation, collection, and preservation of the crime scene.  In addition, the course will provide an introduction to the techniques utilized in crime scene reconstruction and present complications attributed to specialized crime scenes.

Prerequisite(s):
FRSC A201 Criminalistics II: Crime Lab
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the crime laboratory and the role it plays within criminal investigations and the courtroom. The student will be provided with information through lectures and then given the opportunity to apply this knowledge during laboratory experiments. Specialized topics, within the crime laboratory, that are covered include physical and trace evidence, controlled dangerous substances and toxicology, fingerprints, serology and DNA, and quality assurance.

Prerequisite(s):
FRSC A301 Criminalistics III: Controlled Substances
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course reviews the broad area of drugs or chemicals whose manufacture, possession, or use  are regulated by the government and subject to legislative control. Topics covered include drug identification, drug dependency, drug effects, and forensic toxicology.

Prerequisite(s):
FRSC A370 Forensic Psychology
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course is suited for individuals who seek careers in law, law enforcement, criminal investigation, corrections, etc.  Familiarizes students with the varied components and applications of forensic psychology. Forensic psychology involves applying psychology to the field of criminal and civil investigation and the law.

Prerequisite(s):
FRSC A380 Forensic Pathology
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course introduces students to the medical specialty of Forensic Pathology –the practice of laboratory medicine as it applies to the law and legal issues. It examines the basics of forensic science and death investigation, post mortem changes, time of death and identification of the decedent, and types of cases, which fall under the jurisdiction of the medical examiner/coroner including violent, natural and unexplained deaths.

Prerequisite(s):
FRSC A498 Research in Forensics
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students engage in supervised research in forensic science under the guidance of a Loyola faculty member. Students present a formal research proposal and upon approval complete the research within one semester. This will usually be the last course completed in the Forensic Science minor.

Prerequisite(s):

French (FREN)

FREN A100 First-year French I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course focuses on the fundamental structure of the french language. Development of the four basic skills - listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing - are of primary concern.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN A101 First-year French II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation in appropriation of the four basic skills with emphasis on correct pronunciation and the acquisition of fundamental vocabulary.

Prerequisite(s): First-year French I or placement
FREN A200 Second-year French I
Credit Hours:
3.00

Development of basic language skills continues with emphasis on grammar and the acquisition and use of new vocabulary in cultural contexts. Reading and discussion of articles and other writings are undertaken with grammatical exercises and short compositions based on cultural topics.

Prerequisite(s): First-year French II or placement
FREN A201 Second-year French II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course consists of readings and discussion in French of literary and cultural texts. Students write short essays based on the readings and demonstrate use of basic techniques of textual analysis through discussion and in writing.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French I or placement
FREN A300 Advanced Grammar and Composition
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course reviews intensively the structure of the language and of idiomatic expressions. Daily translations and frequent original compositions are required.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A301 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, students acquire an extensive working vocabulary and fluency through conversation, reading, and discussion of cultural texts. French phonetics and its application to the improvement of pronunciation are also studied.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A315 Analysis of French Texts
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course discusses specific techniques of intensive reading and analysis through an in-depth study of a variety of short texts in French chosen to represent various discourse styles, periods, genres, themes, and traditions from both French and Francophone cultural milieux. Special emphasis is on training students in the commentaire or explication de texte.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A320 Culture and Civilization I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to French civilization from Lascaux and Gallo-Roman times to the 18th century. It includes the study of the geography of the French hexagon, from the centrality of Paris to the regionalism of the provinces. Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque art and music are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A321 Culture and Civilization II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of the important historical, social and economic events beginning with the Revolution of 1789 to  the present. The nature and development of French aesthetics and artistic traditions in painting, sculpture, and music will be presented, along with current topics including education, and the politics of modern-day France.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A325 La Nouvelle-Orleans
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the French heritage of New Orleans, and explores the French side of our history, institutions, architecture, language, food, and celebrations. The assignments and discussions help students know and appreciate the cultural uniqueness and rich heritage of the city in which they live and study.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A330 Introduction to French Literature I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of the major literary currents and principal authors from the Middle Ages through the 17th century.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or placement
FREN A331 Introduction to French Literature II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of the major literary currents and principal authors of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent
FREN A351 Enlightenment and Pre-Romanticism
Credit Hours:
3.00

Major trends and ideas in 18th-century literature are examined. Emphasis is on the works of the philosophies and on the development of the novel.

Prerequisite(s): At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A352 19th-century Prose
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course involves readings in French theory and in the novels of Balzac, Flaubert, Sand, Stendhal, and Zola. 

Prerequisite(s): At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A353 20th-century Prose
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course involves readings in French theory and in the works of Bernanos, Butor, Camus, Gide, Malraux, Proust, and Sartre. 

Prerequisite(s): At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A354 Introduction to French Poetry
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course centers on the reading and analysis of poems reflecting the major currents in French poetry from Lamartine, Baudelaire, and Mallarmé to the more recent works of Perse and Ponge.

Prerequisite(s): At least one 300-level course or the equivalent
FREN A355 Introduction to French Theatre
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a chronological view of the development of French drama from its origins to the 20th century offering students an intensive study of representative dramatists and elements of the theatre.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent
FREN A360 Femmes de France
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a cross-disciplinary advanced French course that provides a detailed account of the most influential French women from various disciplines who helped shape the French identity. We will study the accomplishments of Jean d'Arc, Catherine de Medicis, Marie-Antoinette, Marie Curie, Gabrielle Chanel, Simone de Beauvoir, and others. In class we will also examine French feminism as opposed to its American counterpart, gain better understanding of gender roles in French society, and question the relevance of the representations of women in the media, literature, and the arts. 

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent level through placement
FREN A361 French Chanson
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a survey of French vocal music from the troubadour tradition of the Middle Ages to the realistic tones of Edith Pilaf to the electronic vibes of Daft Punk and modern-day rap and rai. Students examine how singing has always been a part of the French art de vivre and political scene and has reflected major changes in society. Although students gain insight into all genre and eras, as well as the specifics of the French music industry, special focus will be given to Bell Epoque cabaret music, 20th century drinking songs, WWI and WWI military songs, "chansons realists," and Francophone performers such as Josephine Baker, Jacques Brel, Celine Dion, Cheb Khaled, and Stromae, who have helped French-singing repertoire reach out to global listeners. 

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent level through placement
FREN A362 French Fashion
Credit Hours:
3.00

Using scholarly and magazine articles, advertisements, commercials, interviews, and films, this course explores the evolution of French fashion from the strict sartorial laws of the Middle Ages to the recent scandals around Dior's firing of former head designer John Galliano. Students will be introduced to the connections between the historical background and the emergence of trends and to the ethical challenges the globalized economy poses to large groups such as LVMH. The course offers a plunge into what makes French fashion unique - pret-a-porter, haute-couture, and craftmanship- and it provides insight into legendary designers such as Chanel, Dior, St. Laurent, and Gaultier. 

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent level through placement
FREN A364 Food and the French
Credit Hours:
3.00

In this course, students explore the role and importance of food in French history, society, the media, and the arts. We will look at a variety of sources: cookbooks, newspapers, novels, movies, and writings by Claude Levi-Strauss and some French sociologists. Students investigate the material, and study of French food will serve as a context to review French grammar, vocabulary, and composition skills. We will also cook and eat from time to time.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent level through placement
FREN A365 Paris and the Arts
Credit Hours:
3.00

For centuries, Paris has been an inspiration and home to artists, writers, and performers, and a place where artistic expression is central to everyday life. This course looks at the art and its cultural context over a broad period of time. Students study great works of art and architecture, and read literary excerpts that help define the intellectual and cultural context of each time period. Course work surveys the French art world, briefly for the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 17th and 18th centuries, and in more detail for the 19th and 20th centuries. As the occasion arises, other forms of artistry may have a place in this course, including the culinary arts, cinema, and music. 

Prerequisite(s): Second-year French II or equivalent level through placement
FREN A480 Capstone
Credit Hours:
1.00

Capstone course required of all majors. Student work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor. Capstone work should reflect the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a Languages and Cultures major.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN A495 Special Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Students work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN A496 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN A497 Internship/Practicum
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN A498 Senior Thesis
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This course offers students pursuing a thesis the opportunity to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An opportunity to work independently under professorial supervision.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN O263 French and Francophone Cinema
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: Creative Arts and Culture 

French & Francophone Cinema introduces participants to the major past and contemporary film productions of the French-speaking world, with a specific emphasis on France, Belgium, Quebec, and Senegal. Weekly links to interviews with filmmakers or actors, articles and reviews, help students identify tropes in genres, themes, styles, and methods of distribution and financing. Each week students watch emblematic film(s) for each genre/era as a means to interpret signs and symbols.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN T121 First-Year Seminar
Credit Hours:
3.00

Foundation Courses: First-Year Seminar

All first-year students take a 3-credit First-Year Seminar (FYS) during their first semester as part of the Loyola Core. First-Year Seminars at Loyola are small, discussion-based seminars that introduce new college students to academic inquiry at the university level by investigating a relevant topic. Specially-trained faculty lead these seminars in a way that instills in students the academic skills necessary to become successful Loyola students. Course titles may differ from section to section based on the instructor's focus for the course.

Prerequisite(s):

German (GERM)

GERM A100 First Year German I
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an introduction to the German language.  Fundamental structure of the language including development of the four basic skills - comprehension, speaking, reading and writing - is the focus.

Prerequisite(s):
GERM A101 First Year German II
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a continuation of GERM A100 and further develops listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): First Year German I or placement

Greek (GREK)

GREK A100 Beginning Greek I
Credit Hours:
3.00

Language tells us many things about a culture, not only in what people have to say but how they say it. This course introduces students to the world of the ancient Greeks through a study of their language.

Prerequisite(s):
GREK A101 Beginning Greek II
Credit Hours:
3.00

GREK A100 continued.

Prerequisite(s): Beginning Greek I or placement
GREK A250 Intermediate Greek
Credit Hours:
3.00

Intermediate Greek is a continuation of the Beginning Greek A100/101 series; it focuses on allowing students to acquire knowledge and facility of more complex syntactical structures while encouraging them to continue to build their vocabulary and translation skills. As the course progresses, students make the transition from adapted to unadapted texts and are introduced to intermediated and advanced level commentaries, dictionaries, and grammars.

Prerequisite(s):
GREK A300 Homeric Greek
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students in this course read selections from Homer and Hesiod as well as selections from the Homeric Hymns. Study includes examination of the epic meter and the impact of the epic poets on subsequent literature.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A314 Greek Tragedy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the tragedy of ancient Athens. Study focuses on the mechanics of the language, the workings of the tragic stage, the historical background of the plays, and the larger issues about society that the plays raise. 

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A315 Greek Comedy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines both old and new comedy of ancient Athens. Study focuses on the mechanics of the language, the workings of the comic stage, the historic background of the plays, and the larger issues about society that the plays raise.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A322 New Testament Greek
Credit Hours:
3.00

Students taking this course read and discuss at least two books from the New Testament. In addition, they compare a variety of modern translations to the original text.

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A402 Greek Historians
Credit Hours:
3.00

An intensive study of one or more ancient Greek historians. Students examine the author’s style, influence, philosophy, and assessment regarding his topic. 

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A410 Greek Philosophy
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is an intensive survey of one or two ancient Greek philosophers. Students examine the author’s style, influence, and place within the historical and social context of philosophy. 

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A420 Greek Oratory
Credit Hours:
3.00

A survey of the speeches of the Greek orators. These readings reveal the development of early Greek prose and provide a window into many interesting scenarios from life in Classical Athens as well as provide evidence for the function of Greek oratory in Athenian democracy. 

Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Greek or equivalent
GREK A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite(s):

History (HIST)

HIST A202 Historian's Craft
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course serves as an introduction to the art and craft of history. Designed for incoming history majors and transfer students, the course will provide an introduction and overview of the important features of the historian’s craft from conceptualizing ideas to research methods, to critical reading and writing, to the philosophy of history, and to the basic concepts of historiography.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A235 Seminar in Global Issues
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is open to all students by invitation who want the challenge of engaging macro questions of the human experience within the context of different moral and political values. The course is limited to 20 students and then only to second-semester freshmen through first-semester seniors. The seminar is intended to prepare Loyola’s most able students for success in scholarship and fellowship competitions.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A283 Games, Fictions, & Power in China
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is about power in China during and before the Ming dynasty - both how power worked, and how Chinese elites thought it worked. Using a role playing game, we explore the workings of Confucian power at court, and then study the ways people thought about power through games, fiction, and philosophical writings.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A313 Islam in China
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course uses China to understand Islam, and Islam to understand China, in order to develop more sophisticated views of both phenomena. By the end of the course, students' image of the mosque will have room for Chinese-style pagodas, and their imagination of China will include Turkic Sufi poetry.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A317 History of Genocide
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course examines the nature of genocide concentrating on episodes of genocide in the twentieth and twenty-first century, and investigating distant and proximate roots of specific episodes in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.  The consequences of specific acts of genocide, responses to genocide and strategies for combating genocide are also considered.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A327 Hitler and Nazi Germany
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course traces the development of Hitler through his rise to power to his subordination of Germany to his dictatorship.  It examines the character of the Nazi state, its monopolization of power through terror, its racial agenda, its aggressive ethnic imperialism, and its ultimate defeat as a result of hubristic over-extension.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A360 Punishment and Power in Modern Japan
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course covers the penal practices used in Japan from the 17th century to modern times. It explores how changes in the law related to the country’s desire to conform to Western legal standards in the 19th and 20th centuries. The Japanese prison system, “thought control” and the legal implications of the Allied Occupation are studied.  Cross-listed with JPNS A360

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A370 History of India
Credit Hours:
3.00

The history of India from the pre-Vedic period to the present is examined, emphasizing social and cultural developments, including the caste system, family structure, and the role of women. Art, architecture, literature, and music are analyzed as reflections of Indian values. Attention is also on the British Raj, the national independence movement led by Mahatma Gandhi, and contemporary India.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A400 Historiography
Credit Hours:
3.00

This course is a study of the meaning of history through the eyes of philosophers, theologians, and historians; it studies both philosophies of history and the various approaches to historical investigation. Required of all students majoring in history.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A404 Documentary & Oral Histories
Credit Hours:
3.00

This class uses the methodology of oral history to explore an aspect of the history of New Orleans through interviews. Students use A/V equipment to preserve their interviews and they use the information they gather to write term papers and produce documentaries.  The focus of this course varies each semester.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A493 Directed Reading Course
Credit Hours:
3.00

The course content varies but is keyed to student and faculty interests in relevant professional topics.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A496 Seminar/Workshop
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A497 Internship/Practicum
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A498 Research Project
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST A499 Independent Study
Credit Hours:
1.00, 3.00

Independent work done under professorial supervision. 

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q225 Ideologies and Economics
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: History II: Modern World

This course examines how the modern world has been shaped by ideologies and economics. From Classical Liberalism to the Arab Spring, students look at the ideas and economic realities that have forged our world.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q230 Oppression and Resistance
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: History II: Modern World

This interdisciplinary survey challenges students to critically evaluate the roles that racism, sexism, and prejudice have played in shaping the modern world. Students compare and contrast case studies of slavery, persecution, subjugation, and genocide and explore the violent and nonviolent resistance of marginalized peoples. To achieve a deeper understanding of the broad impact of bigotry and the efficacy of social justice movements, they connect specific struggles to the global narrative.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q231 Law in Modern America
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge & Values: History II

This course, a continuation of HIST Q238 , examines the major developments in American legal history from 1865 through the 20th century.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q232 American Trials
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge & Values: History II

This course focuses on famous American trials and uses them as a means to examine the broader historical context in which they took place. Particular attention is given to why these trials captured the public’s attention at the time they occurred and why they still have a hold on the popular imagination today.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q234 Technology, Nature, and the West
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: History II: Modern World

This course explores various scholarly explanations for why and how industrialization  first appeared in the West, with particular emphasis placed on role of technology in the utilization of natural resources and its attendant ecological effects.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q236 Historical Geography
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge-Values Courses: History II: Modern World

This course examines modern (1400s-present) international history through the lens of geography. It will provide basic information about physical processes that have been important to social phenomena while emphasizing the role of politics and institutions in the formulation of knowledge and space. It is, moreover, intended to help students fulfill state requirements for the Teaching Certificate.

Prerequisite(s):
HIST Q238 Law in Early America
Credit Hours:
3.00

Knowledge & Values: History II

This survey course examines the major developments in American legal history from the Colonial period to the Civil War.

Prerequisite(s):